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gThumb gThumb is an advanced image viewer and browser. It has many useful features, such as filesystem browsing, slide show, image catalogs, web album creation, camera import, image CD burning, batch file operations and quick image editing features like transformation and color manipulation. It's designed for GNOME desktop environment and uses its ...


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I use Kdenlive as a video editing program and also use it for timelapses. I think it probably quite suits you. It is open source and not that hard to use. You can also find the official manuall here. To do a slideshow all you have to do is import a folder or pictures where all your photos are in as a slideshow clip (click on the arrow next to the "import ...


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Try GThumb. sudo apt-get install gthumb Open up your image. Select save as in "File"->"Save as Give it a name with a .jpg extension. Select the directory and click save. This little window pops up where you can change the image quality by sliding the quality slider:


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The WindowManager - or for most modern Linux's the DesktopEnviroment - makes a huge difference. The more bells and whistles (especially 3d ones) your desktop uses, the less is left to actually run programs. Use a lightweight DesktopEnviroment like xfce or lxde, instead of GNOME, KDE or Unity(the standard for Ubuntu) - ie. install xubuntu (xfce) rather than ...


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There are at least 2 ways to do this... 1. You can get a distro, like one of these eight tiny linuxes listed on this webpage, http://m.techradar.com/news/software/operating-systems/8-of-the-best-tiny-linux-distros-683552 Or, You can manually build your own kernal for your distro... this is tedious and time-consuming at first... but, once you become ...


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There are versions of Ubuntu that take less processing power. If you're using it for graphics, the best is probably Ubuntustudio because it uses XFCE (Xubuntu) which uses very little resources to run and it's designed for exactly what you do. I run it on an old Pentium 4 and it's awesome. ubuntustudio.org Also, one of the most noticeable improvements you ...


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If Ubuntu is running slowly it might be worth trying out the other 'flavours' of it. Lubuntu or Xubuntu both use lighter, less resource heavy desktop environments so generally run better on older hardware. You can install the new DE in place with sudo apt-get install lubuntu-desktop. The next time you log in you can select Lubuntu rather than Unity. More ...


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I was doing something similar the other day. Grids are in, it seems. In my case I had a variable number of images being piped into the grid and I just wanted to create a 17 wide image by however many images tall. montage -mode concatenate $(printf 'rose: %.0s' {1..136}) -resize 100x80 -tile 17x output.jpg That just uses 136 rose images to form a ...


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See the montage command from imagemagick (sudo apt-get install imagemagick). montage -geometry 250x250+0+0 image1.png image2.png out.png This will resize each image (to 250px with no deformation) and combine them with no margin. More montage examples. You can also use convert (example with wildcards): convert -append pixpixp-*.jpg newpix.jpg


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The thumbnail specification includes shared thumbnail repositories , which allow for pre-generating thumbnails to be distributed along with the associated files rather than have every user generate their own thumbnail. So in theory you could generate thumbnails and then add them to a shared repository thus removing the need to generate them in future if you ...


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Install package gimp-dcraw. This is simple plugin that uses dcraw to decode RAW files and pass them to GIMP. All editing like colors, tone curves, stamps etc. are done with GIMP built-in editing tools, plugin only asks for optional decoding parameters.


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You find the installed icons in /usr/share/icons and the background images in /usr/share/backgrounds The icons are separated into subdirectories be theme, kind of icon, and icon size. There are .png and .svg icons: $ ls /usr/share/icons/Humanity-Dark/places/48 distributor-logo.svg gnome-main-menu.svg novell-button.svg start-here.svg


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No, the program can not detect the size of an image with no header. You have just the pixel data, the information whether 200 pixels are a 10x20 image, or a 20x10 image, is just not in the file. What you can do is finding out how many pixels the image has, and try formats that make sense, trying the ones first that are common or are expected with your use ...


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It looks like there isn't such an option but you can control your mouse from command line using xdotool, so you can try to play with it: (gnome-screenshot -a &); sleep 0.1 && xdotool mousemove 100 100 mousedown 1 mousemove 500 500 mouseup 1 I use (cmd &) syntax to have command running in background (using just && here won't work ...


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Use tiffcp Usage: tiffcp [options] input... output.tiff For instance: tiffcp *.tiff output.tiff And you will have a resulting multipage tiff Then tiff2pdf (a wrapper for ghostscript) Usage: tiff2pdf [options] input.tiff Source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11135405/how-to-merge-many-tif-files-to-single-tif-file A multipage tiff needs a ...



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