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I don't know if you're still out there, but perhaps for other users this might help. Sometimes you can use the "file" command to see the metadata of your file. In mine, I could use the "timedate" tag


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Your first question can be addressed easily enough: find . -iname '*.jpg' -exec convert '{}' -format webp '{}'.webp \; This will: Recursively find all .jpg files, as in your example Convert each .jpg file to webp using convert rather than mogrify Use the naming convention you were after: 'filename.jpg.webp' Tested nicely on my system... References: ...


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You can use Libreoffice as a headless tool to convert docs to pdf: libreoffice --headless --convert-to pdf *.doc (Taken from this SO answer)


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The following method may be helpful: for i in *.jpg do convert "$i" -resize 100x100 -background white -compose Copy \ -gravity center -extent 100x100 "${i%.jpg}_thumb.jpg" done You should alter the background colour according to the background colour of your file manager...


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Some functionality of the dependent packages depend on ImageMagick by definition. This means that the dependent packages (cups etc.) have been built in a way that they require (depend on) ImageMagick to complete certain operations. So, without a working ImageMagick, cups built by Ubuntu will not work as intended. To make sure all the installed packages work ...


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ImageMagick is a suite of command line tools and libraries for working with images and packages that depend on it or uses parts of it to function. Cups uses it for its filters and while it's possible that you don't use any filters that use ImageMagick, I'd recommend that you keep it, because removing it may break Cups. Now, if you still want to remove it, ...



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