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0

As per Adonis' comment, the exclamation mark, "!" forces mogrify to ignore the aspect ratio of the original image. so using "1920x1080!" in the size parameter did the trick.


2

If you don't need recursion, you can use Imagemagick's batch tool, mogrify. This takes most of the same arguments. To scale the longest size down to 300px, we can offer -resize "300x300>". For safety's sake I've also got this saving the new images into a subdirectory rather than overwriting. # assuming you're in the directory of images mkdir resized ...


1

The issue in the question was resolved by adding appropriate swap. For completeness let me give a summary of additional options we have when running Image Magick convert on huge files on low memory systems, or when there is no swap available, or the swap was too small. The methods mentioned below are elaborated in detail in the Image Magick manual: Really ...


0

As a lot of solutions here recommend redacting / blacking out through annotations (which leave the original content in the pdf), I recommend rasterizing the pdf afterwards to truly remove the original content. Here's one way to do that which, at the same time, keeps the quality up and the file size low (at least in my case of a bunch of black/white pages): ...


5

I'm assuming you are running out of RAM. You can verify this with watch cat /proc/meminfo while your process is running. You may have insufficient RAM and/or SWAP to accomplish your task. Due to the low-ram condition, insure that swap is on with swapon -a and if no swap is setup on the system create a partition for swap on unused diskspace and enable it. ...


0

Use print assistant from Gwenview (KDE image viewer). Open Gwenview, then Plugins -> Images -> Print assistant. Add all the images that you want to print, reorder them as you like, choose number of images per page, other print options, etc. and print to PDF directly or with CUPS-PDF.


0

You could use a for loop: for f in ./*.png; do convert "$f" -resize -background white -flatten "${f%.*}.jpg"; done This will operate on every file with a name ending in .png in the current directory. Each go around on the loop, the matched filename is read into the variable $f; in order to massage this information into the output filename, the above ...


5

ImageMagick 6.7.7-10 is the current version for Trusty. There is nothing to upgrade as this version was extensively tested with Trusty. For available upgrades run sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install --only-upgrade imagemagick Only if you run in into a bug that you desperately need to fix yourself, should you compile a newer version: mkdir -p ...


0

You can use Okular. sudo apt-get install okular Open the pdf with Okular. Press F6. Press 8. Highlight the text you wish to redact. Right click the text, select properties, select the "Type" as "Highlight", press Ok. Print the file to a pdf.



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