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MonoDevelop IDE: One of the most important tools that allows me to leverage my Microsoft VB.NET/C# skills on linux is the MonoDevelop IDE. Except for Microsoft proprietary classes such as System.Windows.Forms, all your .NET code is 100% portable to linux through the Mono platform. The only support that MonoDevelop lacks as of now is the ability to design ...


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You can compile your programs with C++ in the command line - you don't have to have a full enterprise IDE with a GUI and all. Navigate to the directory with the .cpp program, and use g++ with the "-std=c++11" flag and it will compile it to C++ 11. For example: g++ -std=c++11 your_file.cpp I did a lot of my Kernel coding through compiling in command line.


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Many people end up using QtCreator. It can do C++, Qt, Python. Hardcore way is Emacs. You can do a lot of things when you master it, but it is a big when. Netbeans is a nice, but heavy thing. Eclipse even nicer and heavier. Best of all start with QtCreator. Its scripting can mimic to some extent most cool features you heard of in others.


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I decided to go another quick google search as my first one didn't give me any decent results. I found another question about graphical diff viewers that mentioned diffuse. No extra libraries were needed for installation. One caveat - apparently, it doesn't support directory comparison but I have yet to try it out so maybe the newest version does?



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