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4

In MATE, right clicking on the menu and selecting "Edit menus" will get you the menu editor: Find the Telegram entries under the Internet category in the menu editor application, and uncheck one of them. The process is very similar for XFCE. Note that using this menu editor, you can completely customize the menu, move things around, and so on. It's pretty ...


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The default icon theme in Ubuntu does use mostly vector (SVG) icons. For smaller sizes though, icons tend to be raster images, in order for the icons to be pixel perfect. However, all graphics are going to be rendered into pixels for display. When you scale them to odd sizes, there are going to be artifacts, even for SVG icons. For the best looking app ...


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The launcher icon should be there now, if you have version 3.0-snap11 The translations are going to take some work in the packaging, but it's possible to do. This was just a very basic snap config to get started with.


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Using Pango fontYou can set a list of multiple fonts to use in your ~/.i3/config, either for a specific status bar (workspace names, mode indicators and status messages) or globally (title bars and all status bars). Settings on single status bars override global settings. The first font that provides a certain glyph is then used to draw it. For example: ...


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Is your application up to date? If not download and install the current version from the Viber official website. That worked for the issues I had. Hope it'll work for you too.


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Another not answer but solution. I use quicklists to create launchers for my most commonly used terminal sessions, i then make profiles for each one in gnome-terminal to do things like change their colours, this makes it really easy to know which server you are using. You can do this by editing your gnome-terminal.desktop file in ~/.local/share/...


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Not an answer As mentioned in the comment, an application in principle can only be represented by one icon in the launcher at a time. This has always been the case. What you are referring to is probably that Unity has become "smarter" in determining which of the .desktop files is the best representative for the application's window. Therefore, your script,...


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Mostly no. To this answered date, Xfce has limited to no transitions for panels and icons. Nothing fancy, besides minimizing active applications window to the panel in Xfce. Xfce allows delay Delay is a transition or pseudo-animation in Xfce that I have tried before. This is documented as part of theming Xfce panel in this page of Xfce Docs. Requirement: ...


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You mean these?: NOTE: Before doing this, restart the Xfce panel with xfce4-panel --restart in a Terminal. Here, I have a video that explains the process: Or, text explanation: Right click any indicator → Properties, which shall get you to this: Where you can hide indicators by the ticking the checkbox that says Hidden next to the indicator ...


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Xfce uses GTK+ (just like GNOME, Unity and Pantheon). However, it does not require any external 'Tweak Tools' (unlike GNOME, Unity and Pantheon) because it is very customizable by default — all settings are included and change-able by default. To change the GTK+ theme and the icons, use Settings Manager → Appearance. To change window borders, use Settings ...


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These are actually two questions, but here we go: In a .desktop file, usually, combining Terminal=false and Terminal=true is not working out well. Most of the time, only one works well, the one in the "main" command. Alternatively, set for the command: Exec=gnome-terminal -e <command> In this case: Exec=gnome-terminal -e blender For your second ...



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