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Make sure hibernation is enabled. Open the Terminal Type sudo pm-hibernate into the terminal and press Enter. Enter your password when prompted. If the hibernate test works, you can continue to use the sudo pm-hibernate command when you want to hibernate. Run in the terminal: sudo gedit ...


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What's the difference between sleep, suspend, and hibernate? Sleep (sometimes called Standby or “turn off display”) typically means that your computer and/or monitor are put into an idle, low power state. Depending on your operating system, sleep is sometimes used interchangeably with suspend (as is the case in Ubuntu based systems). What sleep does on ...


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Follow steps in terminal. sudo gedit /etc/pm/sleep.d/20_custom-ehci_hcd In gedit copy the second code you will see on ubuntu forums, Here's the link.


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I would try suspending (standby) with this command: dbus-send --system --print-reply \ --dest="org.freedesktop.UPower" \ /org/freedesktop/UPower \ org.freedesktop.UPower.Suspend Change Suspend to Hibernate if you want to hibernate instead I would probably create an alias in ~/.bashrc such as alias standby="dbus-send --system --print-reply \ ...


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Install gnome-tweak-tool by: sudo apt-get install gnome-tweak-tool Hit Super key/Windows key and search for Tweak Tool. Go to 'Power' options and change the behavior as you wish.


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I had same problem. Try: ntfsfix /dev/sda5 "remove_hiberfile" option no longer works. "ntfs-3g" package policy is to use the new tool ntfsfix However, this tool didn't work for me either. So I plugged the hard disk in a Windows machine, turned off "Fast Startup" in power button options from within Windows, then shutdown and replaced back the hd in my ...


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No, you can't make that setup using HandlePowerKey entry for systemd. It is not a script hook, just a predefined options. HandlePowerKey=, HandleSuspendKey=, HandleHibernateKey=, HandleLidSwitch=, HandleLidSwitchDocked= Controls whether logind shall handle the system power and sleep keys and the lid switch to trigger actions such as system ...


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Concerns about swap on SSDs are unfounded. They can handle a good 10,000 writes, so to wear out a 500 GB SSD you would have to write 100 MB / second to it every second for for 578 days. There is no way you are going to manage to keep it constantly swapping that much for that long, and certainly writing 1-2 gb for hibernation once or twice a day is not ...


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Depending on how much RAM your system has, you can get away with using very little swap, and even then, your computer will only use swap when it runs out of space in RAM. Obviously, writing to the SSD will shorten its lifespan, but as long as you avoid using utilities that make many small writes (like defragmentation) you should be fine. Hibernate works by ...


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You should check your swappiness value. Usually it is left at 60. It should be 10 or 15: cat /proc/sys/vm/swappiness You can change it on the fly with sudo bash -c "echo -e 10 > /proc/sys/vm/swappiness" and make it stick with sudo bash -c "echo 'vm.swappiness = 15' >> /etc/sysctl.conf"


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use kill -SIGSTOP $(pgrep process_name) to suspend a process and kill -SIGCONT $(pgrep process_name) to resume it. In terminal the shorthand would be: Ctrl+Z to suspend and fg to bring it back into forground, bg to make it continue in background.


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Your problem is in not matching UUID. You probably re-created your swap partition after install. You can fix it by running sudo tee /etc/initramfs-tools/conf.d/resume <<< "RESUME=UUID=de8544b3-7bca-4ff1-9a1c-755bcc6da7b4" sudo update-initramfs -u -k all and reboot. To enable hibernation in shutdown menu you can use this answer.


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For the situation I described running a non-stock kernel, the following solution worked. Depending on what kernel series you're using, YMMV: You'll need to do these to get grub/initramfs set up correctly: sudo blkid | grep swap <-- get your swap uuid sudo <your_text_editor_here> /etc/default/grub <-- edit your grub file ...


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I found this to be very helpful. First you must make sure your swap is setup to save the current state onto swap and then resume. It involves setting your fstab, grub, and initramfs files properly. Please read the following carefully and completely. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SwapFaq Next you can follow this ubuntu help to test for and setup ...



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