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6

You can't compare Windows and Linux, because video driver performance and features are different. For instance, if you are using nVidia you need a card that supports vdpau for best performance, which is equivalent to PureVideo in Windows. PureVideo supports many more cards. However, depending on your CPU, you can play HD videos smoothly without vdpau ...


5

As an alternative, can I suggest you use OpenShot to edit video and also upload HD quality video to Youtube. You export the video similar to this picture. You can then use the inbuilt upload feature to send to Youtube


5

Since you used an ffmpeg tag I will use that for the answer. ffmpeg -i input.wmv -s hd720 -c:v libx264 -crf 23 -c:a aac -strict -2 output.mp4 Change the video quality by specifying a different CRF parameter. See the x264 encoding guide for more info.


5

Flash under linux does not support hardware acceleration. So instead of your graphics accelerator your CPU has to do all the audio/video decoding, which makes playback laggy. You have several options here. You could Enable HTML5 playback and see if that fixes the issue for you (works on youtube and a couple of other sites). Not all youtube videos ...


4

Looks like Lightworks will be available for ubuntu next month. http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2012/09/oscar-winning-video-editor-lightworks-landing-on-linux-in-october Lightworks running on Ubuntu


4

Microsoft Silverlight is only compatible with Windows. I would suggest against using Wine because, as you said, it causes decreased performance. I would suggest using Pipelight, an open-sourced remake of Silverlight for Linux. Make sure you have all browsers closed prior to installing. Add the Pipelight repositories and update: sudo apt-add-repository ...


4

Can you confirm if hardware assisted decoding is actually being used at all? The output from mplayer and vlc (if run in a console) would help confirm or deny this if you could add it to your original question. Try this in ~/.mplayer/config to turn it on: vo=vdpau,xv vc=ffh264vdpau,ffmpeg12vdpau,ffwmv3vdpau,ffvc1vdpau


3

While your hardware is a bit dated, it can be made to play 1080p with a few expenses. Buy some more system memory RAM is very cheap these days. Upgrading it to, say 2 gigabytes will give you a big performance boost straight away. Buy a graphics card to accelerate video playback This doesn't need to be a hugely expensive one. NVidias graphics cards ...


3

Blender has an integrated Video Sequencer and supports 4K cinema resolution, a proof of that is that Sintel, a movie produced with blender, is available for download in 4K :) http://www.blendernation.com/2011/02/20/sintel-4k-available/ More information about Blender here: http://www.blender.org/ You can obviously install Blender from the Ubuntu ...


3

GIMP The Open Source version of PhotoShop is GIMP. If you are proficient with PhotoShop you might have a hard time getting to re-learn everything since it does things differently (sometimes harder, sometimes easier). With GIMP you can do amazing things with images. GIMP is an advanced picture editor. You can use it to edit, enhance, and retouch ...


3

VA-API (Hardware Acceleration For Intel ) Jupiter or similar power saving app for 13.04? check my answer for full detail for Intel GPUs (for Intel HD Graphics as well as G45 and later): sudo apt-get install i965-va-driver libva-intel-vaapi-driver vainfo Configuration VLC Its in Tools > Preferences > Input & Codecs > Enable Use GPU ...


2

Thanks "AbrahamVanHelpsing" for your replies and sorry for the delay. I have finally fixed my issue and thought it may be helpful for others as well.. After struggling I found out that nothing was wrong with my VLC setup. I could actually just have left the default settings. The problem was my connection speed... I was convinced that it wouldn't be the ...


2

One (drastic) change which can help is to disable Compositing completely via xorg.conf: Open the file /etc/X11/xorg.conf with an editor using sudo, for example by executing this command in a terminal: gksudo gedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf Note: If the file does not exist yet, you need to create it by following these instructions. Add these lines to the end of ...


2

1. Get ffmpeg It is always a good idea to use a recent build when encoding with ffmpeg. Development is very active and using a recent build will allow you to avoid fixed bugs while giving you access to the latest features. There are two main methods to get ffmpeg and neither will interfere with packages from the repository including the so-called "ffmpeg" ...


2

This may help: Transcoding is made easy by using several GUI's or command line tools. Of which I previously posted this answers, I hope this help you. What is the best tool for converting and reading video to be played on DVD players? How can I maximum compress video files? Additionally, there are a few other answers in this forum under the "video" tag ...


2

Usually this is selectable in the BIOS of the machine. I have a system with an NVidia card that has both HDMI and VGA outputs. In the BIOS, I had to select "Primary Display Port" as "HDMI", and then it would always default to HDMI for BIOS, grub, console, etc output.


2

mp4's can be easily edited using both kdenlive and openshot. If you use kdenlive you may be in the need to have KDE's theme properly configured in order to avoid problems with the menus and other program's items while at work. I personally prefer the usage of kdenlive. Transcoding can also be done inside of both these NLES. Or by following one of this ...


2

You will lose quality (unavoidable, any time you transcode you lose quality), although it might not be noticeable. You can use a program such as handbrake (downloadable from their PPA, see http://handbrake.fr/downloads.php ) It no longer has a preset for PS3, but a quick search found these instructions. Adding PS3 template to handbrake (from Ubuntu Forums) ...


1

Ubuntu can play every commonly-used video format. Simply have the videos uploaded in the way they were before you switched to Ubuntu. I really can't imagine a technology your daughter-in-law might upload to that wouldn't work. You may be asked to install a "video codec" or player, but Ubuntu will recognize and install the required software automatically. If ...


1

This is something I had to deal with as well and I came to the conclusion if I use a desktop application like Miro, Totem, VLC, or MiniTube it makes my system run much better and cooler. I prefer Miro, but it still needs some more development until it is perfect and crash free. I hear MiniTube is great, but it is a paid app. Totem works, but isn't as ...


1

Have you tried a different browser such as Firefox? Or if you prefer Chrome there is a lighter version called Chromium in software center.


1

According to AMD's tech support, AMD graphics cards do not offer drivers for linux to allow 5.1 or 7.1 sound through HDMI. So stereo is the best i'll be able to get with this video card. Nvidia cards are better supported with linux so I will likely end up going with another card. I'll update this with specifics when I get a new card working properly.


1

Try upgrading to VLC 2.0.1 if possible. What processor are you using? The CPU alone should be able to handle 1080p H264 video. That is assuming, of course, that your CPU is decent, and I base that assumption on you having a Radeon HD 6900 series graphics card.


1

You might want to consider openbox. It's a bit hacky to set up, and not as "cool" as unity, but you can get a very low-resource desktop with all the important features, like application indicators For a very basic, but full-featured desktop: sudo apt-get install openbox lxpanel lxpanel-indicator-applet-plugin obconf lxpappearance This will pull in some ...


1

Banshee should support x264 if you have the plug-ins installed for it, which I believe are not installed by default. However, if you install the gstreamer0.10-plugins-ugly or gstreamer0.10-ffmpeg packages, then any x264 videos should also play in Banshee.


1

I spoke with AMD directly and learned that Yes, the HD6950 will support H.264 hardware acceleration on Ubuntu. Don't know the state of all AMD drivers but I was told the linux driver for Ubuntu that can be downloaded from the AMD website will get this done. Some other info: In general, the Radeon cards do support 2D and 3D acceleration as documented here: ...


1

The Catalyst driver does provide that kind of acceleration through VA-API, but the challenge is that many programs do not take advantage of it. I believe Mplayer and VLC have the option to use VA-API, but Flash for example has not yet taken advantage of the support for this video acceleration API. In terms of easier driver management, you might be better ...


1

You may be able to use xrandr to add a new mode to the specific output and then select that new mode. See xrandr --addmode and xrandr --mode in the xrandr manpage.


1

It would seem a bit weird for a TV to have 768 lines: HDTVs are usually 720 or 1080 lines, so if the computer thinks the screen is 720 lines I'd be inclined to think it is correct. Is it possible that the TV itself has some options to scale the input? Check to see if there is a "full pixel" or "100%" option, or something similar that will let the display ...


1

It seems to me that the mpg file that was uploaded was indeed an interlaced mpeg2 720x576 (which is 4x3 PAL DVD resolution), and not an h.264 (mpeg4 part 10) encoded file (though h.264 it seems can support interlacing). It looked interlaced to me too using totem (on fully updated 10.04 LTS), but running it through a deinterlacing filter using mplayer $ ...



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