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22

Ubuntu has a list of devices that are certified compatible One day, when I can afford it, I'll buy a system76 laptop. Be cautious when considering a Samsung. (see here: Linux blamed for Samsung laptop deaths) If you plan on also using Windows, it's much easier and safer to install Ubuntu along-side Windows 7. Some people have experienced issues installing ...


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See the Ubuntu Certification website at: http://www.ubuntu.com/certification/ Specifically, for desktops and laptops/netbooks, go directly to: http://www.ubuntu.com/certification/desktop/


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The best way to tell if hardware is working in Ubuntu is to check the official page: Ubuntu Desktop certified hardware My thoughts about how much of a "guarantee" this database of hardware gives you in practice: Some manufacturers (OEMs) silently use other hardware components with similar specifications. "300 Mbps Wireless LAN" in the specifications ...


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You could use hardware compatibility databases. You can even set Ubuntu Linux as a search attribute. When I buy new hardware I usually google for that hardware. Let's say I want to buy a graphic card from nvidia, the gtx260. I would google for "gtx 260 ubuntu" and then I see if other people have any problems. I do that for all the hardware. I always prefer ...


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Canonical has a Component Catalog. Those should work with Ubuntu and not cause conflict. How well they work together in general is not shown.


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By default all client systems are certified for 32-bit, unless the vendor specifically requests 64-bit certification. Servers, though, are only certified in 64-bit. This reflects the fact that the recommended (i.e. the default you get when you go to download) Ubuntu version for client systems is the 32-bit one. This in turn obeys a variety of factors, not ...


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It's very difficult to make a direct comparison between one OS and another temperature wise as the programs that collect the data from the temperature sensors in your machine do that in different ways. For instance two different programs in windows can give different results about the same computer at the same time. I'm sure that the Canonical testing team ...


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The certification tool gets this version from the following command: [ -d /sys/firmware/efi ] && cat /var/log/kern.log* | grep -m 1 -o --color=never 'EFI v.*' I have a T430S which also returns EFI v2.31 by Lenovo. The EFI version number that you see on the certification website (2.3.1, although that's often reported by software as 2.31) refers ...


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Testing hardware compatibility is a long a tedious process, even if you have unrestricted access to the hardware. There is no easy way, I am afraid. Without proper vendor support and testing for Linux, it's down to the user to make sure the hardware works, and that is anything but easy.


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In my experience Acer laptops run it pretty well, though there is a list of compatible computers that run perfectly with it on Ubuntu Certified hardware webpage. system76 has it installed by default, but have varying tech support success and helpfulness. Overall, if you have some time you can run it on pretty much anything.


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According to Canonical: Canonical works closely with Lenovo to certify Ubuntu on a range of their hardware. A lot of developers see value in Lenovo Thinkpads for four main reasons: Trackpoint Functionality. Business Aesthetic. Road Warrior (Durable, good battery life). Comfortable keyboard. http://www.ubuntu.com/certification/make/Lenovo/?page=1


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You can check Ubuntu Certified Hardware. If some hardware is certified you will be 100% it will work for Ubuntu. The problem is: you can't know if some not-certified hardware will work or not.


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Here you will find the info for the wireless : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WifiDocs/WirelessCardsSupported (I know that it's only a small part of the answer you're looking for, I would have it added as comment, but I do not have enough reputation for the moment...)


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This is a bug in the certification site that we know about and will fix soon. As Sylvain said, 2.31 refers to the specification, not the version. The version we used when certifying this system was 0.21.


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Your laptop is actually certified to work with Ubuntu, so you shouldn't have any problems installing it. You can follow the standard installation instructions.


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You can check here for desktop and laptop compatibility that has been tested by Canonical: http://www.ubuntu.com/certification/desktop/ or just buy one of the great machines from System76: http://www.system76.com Then again, I'm running a five-year-old HP EliteBook 6930p, and it runs like a champ.


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My experience with Ubuntu (since 8.04) is that if you don't have brand new components in your computer it will work. For example my laptop an Asus 1201n brand new when I installed 10.04 it had a problem with the wireless network, it was a easy fix after you Googled your hardware and a year later with a fresh 11.04 everything worked just fine. But this is ...


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I would also suggest that you first look for minimum hardware requirements of your Ubuntu version here. Also Ubuntu website has a list of certified devices as mentioned in izx's answer.Make sure you confirm the specifications of the device from hardware provider's home page.



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