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1

First of all you have some extra garbage in /etc/fstab - the string to your /etc/fstab after the last 0 does not belong there. If your router allows you to password-protect your share that do that and consult the official ubuntu wiki page about how to store that password in your /etc/fstab


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Lacking details on your setup, I can only give general guidance. All you have to do is edit (as root) /etc/fstab and add the partition you wish to mount. For details, options, etc, check out https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AutomaticallyMountPartitions


0

The video is not as clear as it could be, but if you are referring to the corrupted text and random lines/dots on the screen, I would say this is video card/GPU or video ram issue. You didn't say if it worked previously, and this is a new problem or if you have never got it working... but I would try a different graphics card.


1

If you have successfully dual booted Windows UEFI with Ubuntu 14.04 in the past, you can use exact same steps to dual boot Windows UEFI and Ubuntu 15.04. There is no difference here.


-1

From my experience, it is not too different. Just make sure to use the Disk Management on Windows to resize your Windows partition; gparted doesn't like to work well with Windows partitions.


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Download the latest stable Clonezilla version (iso) : http://sourceforge.net/projects/clonezilla/files/clonezilla_live_stable/ Create a bootable media (CD/USB) from the iso file. Boot from this former created Clonezilla live media. Create a backup from your HDD ubuntu partition(s). Restore the backup to your SSD. Boot from ubuntu install ...


0

It's fine to link ~/.wine to another partition (eventually on another device/HDD). wine will store most of it's data there. Stop wine run mv ~/.wine /path/to/hdd/mountpoint/ link with ln -s -T /path/to/hdd/mountpoint/.wine ~/.wine


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If you mean that you can put media on the drive from windows then you have already formatted otherwise do that. If you have formatted already then check /media for your hard drive. if this doesn't work go to terminal after plugging in the drive and type lsusb or fdisk -l and you should see your drive here with the name Western Digital or something of the ...


-1

It sounds like you may need to reformat you external hard drive. It will be one of 2 format types but I can't remember which one you need of the top of my head. It will either be FAT32 or NTFS. When you format with windows it will give you a drop down menu. Try both I think you need FAT32 but if this does not work try NTFS. Good luck


0

This is how it's supposed to be. As a normal user you are only interested and have access to your home folder, which is under /home Open a terminal and type ls -l /home (that's a lowercase L, not a numerical one) and you'll see that there is a directory named after your username and its ownership is set to you. This is where you put your work.


1

F3 (Fight Flash Fraud) is another option which should additionally detect fake flash drives (flash drives whose actual capacity is a fraction of advertised capacity): Insert your drive Install F3 sudo apt-get install f3 Write test data to the free space on the drive f3write /media/$USER/D871-DD7C/ Read the test data f3read /media/$USER/D871-DD7C/ ...


1

You need to set bios to boot from the disk where Ubuntu is installed. Then run sudo update-grub in Ubuntu. You will have options in grub menu.


0

[Removed raid explanation] If you wanted to use it in the LVM, you don't need the raid, you can add the harddrives (or rather partitions on the hard drive) directly into the LVM and add that to the pool. (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lvm) Here are a few more step by step instructions, that I cannot test ATM. Your comment implies to me that you are afraid of ...


-1

Try # vgscan # vgchange -ay The problem can occur when lvm2-monitor.service is disabled.


0

I use Gparted and boot-repair on a live USB (in many system rescue iso). Boot with this live USB. Mount your external drive and your internal drive. With Gparted : Free space for the new primary partition (non logical) on your internal drive. (size > size of the partition on the external drive). Copy-paste the ext4 linux partition of your external drive on ...


1

You need to install a proprietary driver for you video adapter. Run in terminal sudo apt-get install nvidia-346 nvidia-prime and reboot.


1

I think i have guessed the reason now. Last night i opened my valuable harddisk filled with memories of people i may never meet again.. the last voices.. the first interactions... expressions... copies of important documents.. programs.. and plans... etc. But they are best left inside my mind. May be i was mad too and went crazily daring. Took as much ...


0

If you have 8GB mem and run a 64-bit system, have a look at zfs: zfs on linux FAQ, nice presentation.


0

If your main goal is to recover the files, I would first try the accepted solution at stackexchange. It is read-only so it sounds safe enough. Replace /dev/sdb1 with the name of the partition on your drive. Use parted -l to figure out the latter.


0

It seems the installer has overwritten your bootloader. Boot from the Windows 8 installer, and the first window will contain a "Repair your computer" label. Then select "Advanced options" and "Command Prompt" Run commands "bootrec.exe /FixBoot" and "bootrec.exe /FixMbr" to fix the bootloader If it says "Element not found" then Windows partition isn't ...


2

That message you're getting is the network boot option that most BIOSes have. It's usually the last entry in the boot order, so it means your hard drive isn't being seen. The clicking sound and this boot problem lead me to believe that your hard drive is dead. You're almost definitely going to have to take it in to have the drive cloned or the data taken ...


2

This is Linux, so it's easy. Type echo $PATH and find a directory that 1) you have write access to; and 2) it is earlier in the list than the directory you get from type -p dd. Put this file in that directory, called dd, and make it executable via chmod +x. Here is the file: ----------------------------- cut here --------------------------- #!/bin/bash ...


1

The ddrescue manual's Algorithm section describes errsize and errors. errsize is the sum of the sizes of the bad-sector "blocks" where a "block" is ddrescue's term for a range of contiguous bad sectors. On the other hand, errors is the count of these bad-sector "blocks". As the manual describes, on each pass after the first, the bad-sector "blocks" are ...


3

Sure, you could write a wrapper script to prevent yourself from making misatkes, but having such a false sense of security established, you're going to have risky behaviour on other systems because you're used to a level of comfort that only exists in your system. Therefore my answer is: Think before root and no, there is no way to block other devices. ...


0

resize2fs /dev/mapper/x Next time you could rather use the lvm-extend: lvm-extend -r /dev/mapper/x


0

It sounds like you deleted the partition tables on the disks, which would then show "unallocated" for all their space (I'm not familiar with the tool you mentioned). The normal use of disks to to add partitions of the desired size, then format the partitions with the desired filesystem.


1

How do I check whether my sdb and sdc drives is mounted? And if they are, where are they mounted? To find out what drives are mounted you can check /etc/mtab, which is a list of all devices mounted on the system. It can sometimes have various tmpfs and other things you aren't looking for mounted too, so I reccomend cat /etc/mtab | grep /dev/sd to get ...


0

mount views all currently mounted disks. You can use mount /dev/sdXY /mnt/DISK to manually mount disks wher X stands for the disk number and Y is the partition number and "DISK" is the mount point. This "DISK" directory should be different for each disk and shoul exist before mounting


0

The lines that I would care about are: SMART overall-health self-assessment test result: PASSED ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME FLAG VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE UPDATED WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE 1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate 0x000f 114 099 006 Pre-fail Always - 59491560 That seems like a large value. 4 Start_Stop_Count ...


0

Try to copy your files as root of your Live-Ubuntu-drive Can you also post the commands you have used?


2

Boot the USB flash again, use "Try Ubuntu", press Ctrl+Alt+T to go to a terminal and type: sudo parted --list sudo grub-install /dev/XdY Where X and Y are in the output of the first command after Disk /dev/ (probably s and a) Then shut down the machine completely, remove the USB disk and start again!


0

Apparently, HP has some of the software (the Management Component Pack fpr ProLiant, MCP) ready, as it is now offered at http://downloads.linux.hp.com/SDR. Having some of it installed on Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS (Kernel 3.16.0-45-generic #60~14.04.1-Ubuntu SMP), I can confirm that at least hplog and hpasmcli provide usable output.


0

If you give the command apropos ntfs you will find there's a man page man mount.ntfs describing the command and driver which will be used when you mount a filesystem of type ntfs. If you just want all files to appear as if they belong to you, just change the /etc/fstab entry field auto to auto,permissions, or if this doesnt work when mounting via nautilus ...


0

You may have correctly installed Ubuntu on the second HDD, but most likely your BIOS is set to use the first HDD as the boot device. That's why you do not see the GRUB screen at all. You just simply need to change the boot order in the BIOS. Or if it is easier, you can swap the order of the disks, by swapping the SATA connectors on the motherboard.


0

Be careful with the following instructions. Working with partitions and stuff like that can result in losing your data. To be sure, save your personal data before fiddling around with the Live System. I would recommend the following solution: boot your PC from the Ubuntu Live CD and start the installation routine. There you can choose the destination for ...


0

Boot from Ubuntu LiveUSB and gparted will let you resize partitions.


0

"You will also want a small swap partition of 4GB size (not shown in the picture) with no mount point, in its own Linux/Swap format to be used as virtual memory." Never install a swap partition on a Jetflash transend thumb drive, you will use all the write cycles in a few minutes and the drive will be finished!!


2

You can use the dd command sudo dd if=/dev/sdx of=/dev/usbx bs=1m For more information you can read the following forum: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1561005


0

Setting the boot priorities in BIOS and putting your USB containing Ubuntu before the HDD with windows will boot up Ubuntu and you will have the HDD mounted as a storage device.


1

Try both! The one that actually has the data on it and you can read it is the one to trust! Honestly, I don't think the SMART errors, unless they're pretty severe, will discredit the drive. I would go with /dev/sdb on this one, but replace both drives ASAP!


1

I also tried this setup for installation but no luck it'll only success after when i remove my primary HDD plug the USB one by removing it from its cover do complete installation and placing back the USB & primary laptop HDD at their original place. Now i am able to boot my USB HDD as external. As in your condition i suggest Make sure you install grub ...


1

If windows8, I believe the key is stored somewhere in the system BIOS. As for accessing the NTFS partition. The problem you have is that Windows was not properly shut down so the Windows system is in a hibernate state. You should properly shut down Windows. Have you tried using the Windows 10 installation USB to boot up? You could probably start the system ...


0

Try to use ntfsfix (it's fix common errors and force Windows to check NTFS) by typing : sudo ntfsfix /dev/name_of_the_partition In your case : sudo ntfsfix /dev/sda4



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