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-1

Just in case, if you found Ubuntu too demanding, did you check other flavors that embed a UX that might be more in line with your computer habits ? One can try Xubuntu or VoyagerLive (a full featured Xubuntu based distro) : http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=voyager


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There are two ways. If you have an NTFS hard drive, testdisk may be the solution. You can get it by typing sudo apt-get install testdisk and run it with sudo testdisk. However, if Testdisk fails to undelete, photorec is the more advanced option. You can install it with the command above, but with photorec instead of testdisk. When using photorec, you can ...


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it still may be possible to recover. Checkout the wiki here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DataRecovery TestDisk is my go to app for such things: http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/TestDisk_Step_By_Step I would boot into a live ubuntu cd / usb drive and install testdisk. sudo apt-get install testdisk


-1

DONT PANIC Pal,you cannot reformat your ubuntu partition from within ubuntu. just try inserting a bootable usb/dvd of UBUNTU, then work your way around to the installation menu of the Ubuntu, when there appears 'Try Ubuntu' AND 'Install' Click on Install, Then goto 'Try Something else', you will see partitions, if it is the full reisntallation you want, ...


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There is also kde application available on repository: Filelight You can install it with sudo apt-get install filelight NAME filelight - Graphical disk-usage information SYNOPSIS filelight [Qt-options] [KDE-options] [path] DESCRIPTION Allows you to exactly understand exactly your disk usage by graphically representating ...


2

Bad sector is error regarding physical of the disk. Instead of isolated the bad sector area, you must change you the hard disk to get rid of the problem. Due to permanent damage that will occurs nearby, the only solution is to replace your hard disk with the new one. Do copy and back up your data before it is broken.


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If you used dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb (orsdc or sdd or ...) and our internal HDD was larger then the amount of data stored on your external drive, you've lost everything on the external hard drive. (Depending on the size of the internal HDD and the amount of data that the external HDD contained, your chances of recovery vary from 0% to an unknown %...) ...


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the only way that i found is enable all the option for saving power on powertop i add this line to /etc/rc.local sudo powertop --auto-tune for now my ssd is around 61° i hope in a better solution or this post is usefull for other


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Another possibility is that it is a software issue. I had the same thing on my laptop. When it happened, I opened "System Monitor" and saw that one process was using 2GB ram and 100% of one core. What can I do to diagnose this? When it happens again, open the system monitor and check if some process is using a lot of ram or cpu. If this is the case, it is ...


2

It's probably a hardware problem, not a software problem, and the two problems in your question are probably related. When a computer fan gets old it wears out and the fan blades aren't mounted snugly on the bearings. This causes the fan to make noise and friction causes the fan to slow down, sometimes to less than half of its normal operating speed. The ...


1

I've had this issue on 4 occasions, since having several laptops since 2007. It didn't matter what brand(Toshiba, HP, Dell, ASUS) Everything you're talking about is plausible. My situation was resolved in the following way. As much as I have taken on board ALL the comments that OTHER people have also suggested, realistically all the 4 occasions were ...


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As to part 1 of this post: Swap with those specs is purely a preference but even /home is not required BUT given your use case HIGHLY HIGHLY recommended as /home is where all those imaging files will go NOT root (/). as for part 2 of this post: you will need to better define "maxing it out" but also of note LibreOffice and kingsoft Office are BOTH in ...


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Run dmesg | tail -30 a few seconds after you connect the external disk. Post the output. This will allow us to see if the kernel recognises the disk at all. You can also install smartmontools: sudo aptitude install smartmontools and run: sudo smartctl --scan and then post the output as well. If your disk is shown in the above command's output, run: ...


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To me, it sounds like you aren't using the correct path to your drive. You need to find the mountpoint of your drive, and change the permissions of that folder. To find the mountpoint, open a terminal and type mount. This will show you a list of all the partitions mounted, and where they are mounted. Find your device and remember where it's mounted. If you ...


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Choose the "something else" option off the installer and create the appreciate mount points on each of your disks


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As Mitch mentions in the comments. The Guest user account is a temporary account. Upon logout of the Guest, all of their changes to the system are removed. Also, the Guest account does not get access to sudo and several other options.


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Found the problem!! Out of the total 100GB partition I made, I used 2GB swap area and made another root partition for the rest of the space for Ext4. My problem was, at the drop down, to install the linux loader, I kept checking the sdb which is my HDD. But my windows 8 loader was on my sda. Even though you want to put linux on a different hard drive than ...


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You need to install a bootloader like GRUB. For now, try to go into your BIOS settings (F12 usually does this) and choose the default boot disk.


-1

I have a SSD with with Sheerly Ubuntu and a 1TD HDD set up as a network share on my desko. I haven't had any issues with this setup so far. The Equivalent to the Program files in Ubuntu is the /etc folder so you would need to format a disk with a mount point of /etc and the system would put that folder there to r/w from. for you I would recommend putting ...


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Only minutes after posting this question, the initial resync cancelled itself again by moving the oldest of my disks to a "spare" location, before even hitting 100%. Even though the device did not reveal any smartclt issues, it turned out that it was in fact broken. This was established by badblocks, which revealed thousands of broken sectors. Replacing ...


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This is the place of your trash folder. Files that you delete with Del in your file manager are stored there. You can bypass the trash by using Shift+Del. ~/.local/share/Trash/* eg: $ ls -l ~/.local/share/Trash/ total 436 drwx------ 6 aboettger aboettger 20480 Apr 29 13:56 expunged drwx------ 2 aboettger aboettger 184320 Mai 6 10:05 files drwx------ ...


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Whenever you mount an external disk, a trash-* directory will be created in the "root" directory where files are moved to if deleted from the GUI, like the trash on your desktop. This is to improve file recovery for external drives. (E.g. USB sticks or HDDs)


2

I would not recommend dd for this task. It will copy sector by sector, raw disk data; so it will work only if the partitions are exactly the same size and layout (leading to corruption otherwise). And then you have again another almost-full partion, that you have to extend... messy. And if the source filesystem is almost full, it's probably quite fragmented, ...


0

There is no way to convert in place a non ZFS file system to a ZFS one. You need to backup the former, create the pool and restore your data. It is also unclear how you want to create a RAIDZ pool with only two 4TB disks. You can only create a mirror or a stripe with two devices.


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It is not possible to reformat your drive without losing all the data stored on it.


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you can either use some tools like clonezilla , redo backup or you can use command line tools such the command dd dd if=/dev/sdXX of=/dev/sdXX bs=4096 check this for how to dd or the command rsync rsync -av /mount-point-of-first-drive /mount-point-of-second-drive based on @Rman, for your case it's better to use rsync. Else if you want to use dd you ...


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If no computer can read the disk and it is an external USB drive then we have two potential problems (it can be both): If it is simply an external desktop drive the actual internal hard drive on the USB hard drive may fine but the USB interface is broken. You'd have to break open the hard drive enclosure and pull out the drive to then hook it up like a ...


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I could not find any simple solution because all data were deleted and the whole HDD was encrypted but I used TestDisk to recover all data. That helped me :)


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On Debian, with WD drives, I find that setting any level with hdparm -S results in the drive returning a level 254 on subsequent hdparm -I. So I'm really not sure if they're spinning down or not. I think they are still spinning down. These drives are on a server array, and I really don't want them to ever spin down. In the past I've kludged this by ...


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You have to do this in steps, not all at once, and you need to move any free space you want to add next to the partition(s) you want to add space to. First, you need to turn swap off, you can do this from the gparted menu. Next add the free space to the extended partition (sda4) -> apply changes. Then you need to move the swap partition so the free space ...


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You might be able to get it back but you'd have to move the whole file system (or all files) to another drive or partition (with enough free space) or an external HDD. Then, remove the encrypted container, and recreate the file system in its entirety without encryption. Finally, make sure that the new file system is properly recognized and that nothing has ...


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What you can do is to boot live USB, and partition your 500 GB HHD to have an ext4 partition, say of 250 GB in size, and leave the other 250 GB for Windows 8. Once done, boot into Ubuntu normally, and find out the UUID of the partition that you created. For that , use sudo blkid, or sudo blkid | awk '/ext4/ {print }'. Once you know it, edit /etc/fstab to be ...


3

If the two drives have the same size, cloning the source drive to the target drive using dd will have the exact same impact a full write of the target disk would have. Before even starting to consider whether this is a problem or not, if you need everything you have already on the old drive and this is "full enough", there shouldn't even be more ...


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There is a good chance to move all the data using LVM tools. There is short info on how to do it: Get USB connector for your SSD disk and attach it to your laptop with SSD connected Repartition your devices same way as your current disk (actually doesn't matter how, but your new LUSK partition should be same or bigger than your current LUKS partition Copy ...


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First, note there is a typo in mount your command. It should be: $ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/username Here /dev/sda2 is the device (in this case, a hard drive's partition) you want to access, and /media/username is your mountpoint, i.e., the location in the filesystem where you want to mount the device. To answer your questions: Yes, using cd is the ...


-1

Your HDD use a msdos partition table that can only hold 4 primary partitions. So your main problem is to make room for another partition on the HDD: this might mean delete(backup before !) a primary partition to create an extended partition and be able to create logical partition inside it. Then once you have room on HDD, you can use gparted (from a live ...



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