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0

The image you wrote to the new HDD is of an 80 GB partition so the computer sees only an 80 GB partition. You should use something like GParted to resize the 80 GB partition to use the whole 1 TB drive, or whatever portion you want to use that is.


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Resize it with gparted partition manager.


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I find more cosy the use of lsblk instead of fdisk -l even because recently it is not always needed to specify the file system type a priory. Moreover I want to mimic the behaviour of the mounting through Device Notifier with the command line. Tested on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS. Step 1: Individuate from where To individuate where is I prefer to use lsblk (from ...


2

Check out Clonezilla here, I've used it to clone Windows+Ubuntu installs on a single disk before. It even offers to attempt clone the bootloader as well. Assuming secure boot is off and your using an MBR partition scheme (as opposed to GPT), it should work fairly well for you.


1

You wrote: So I took one of my external HDDs (total of 360G capacity with about 100G remaining) and issued the command to let it be used as a SWAP space. The antecedent of "it" is unclear, and the answer to your question depends on that detail: "It" = 100GiB Free Space If "it" refers to the 100GiB of free space you mention, then the appropriate ...


0

Given all that errors that the hard disk is giving out, it is pretty clear that it is beyond its end of life. It is not going to work. You can try to recover data using ddrescue or if the data is very important, you may better pay some money and go with the experts.


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Thanks to @Zacharee1 for helping me with this one. Foursimple steps to solve this (make sure the power is OFF before doing this!): Pull out the power cord. On a phone, remove the battery. Press the power button. The power led will likely turn on and briefly after that turn back off. Put the cord or battery back in. Turn the power back on, and everything ...


1

Check your SMPS (power supply) if it is able to supply enough power to yur motherboard and HDD. They are hidden villains in such scenarios.


2

Do not use the original disk any more! Make a copy of the drive using ddrescue on an identical (or larger) disk sudo apt-get install gddrescue sudo ddrescue --binary-prefixes --cluster-size=64 --sparse --timeout=20s /dev/sdg /dev/sdX /path/to/file.log where /dev/sdg is your disk when you can read the disk, but not its partition table and X is the drive ...


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You got permission denied from ntfsfix because you didn't use sudo. Mount is telling you that it can't figure out what kind of filesystem it is ( which does not bode well for being able to access your filesystem at all ) and so it wants to you tell it with -t ntfs, but since it couldn't figure this out on its own, this likely won't work either because your ...


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Since you have /home and / as different partitions, you still have /tmp that is part of / and that could be filling up. Check /tmp, or delete everything in /tmp


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You cannot install operating system on a portable disk. More info you can find on the web, but the only thing you should know that you really cannot install any OS on a portable disk.


2

You can use one of the following commands to get information details about mounted devices: all different commands are used to getting different information in different manners, results ... dmesg sudo fdisk OR sudo fdisk -l sudo blkid lsblk mount lsusb usb-devices df -h


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Reliable, but dangerous method is acquire (for while) equal hard drive replace your HDD PCB with one from equal HDD copy information to another storage (aside of two HDDs mentioned above) replace PCBs back give the equal HDD back to its owner But, it may be disconnection inside the enclosure, so one should disassemble the enclosure and check, if the ...


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I was able to get a VGA adapter, install Mavericks and manually flash the EFI firmware following this thread. The steps are intended for Macbook 5,1 but the workaround is identical for 5,2. Fortunately the beeping sound is gone after flashing the firmware. Ubuntu 11.04 was responsible for this since it replaced the EFI loader with it's own version. The beep ...


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WHAT I'VE DONE: For the users which find my question useful, I'm going to explain how I've done: 20GB SSD: . 10GB for / . 3GB for /var . 1GB for /tmp . 6GB for swap I've based my partitioning on Ubuntu's official installation manual. Please refer to that document. 1TB HDD: . 200GB for /usr . 400GB for /home . 400GB for /DATA (personal media files) ...


1

If you use the nofail option in /etc/fstab, the system will look for your disk (and partition) on boot time. If the device is plugged, the filesystem will be mounted. If not, the boot will continue as normal. See arch wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fstab Example UUID=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX /myusbhdd ntfs nofail,auto,noatime,rw,user 0 0 ...


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Here is another option: Run in the terminal: sudo hdparm -I /dev/sda | grep Serial You will get an output like this: Serial Number: WD-WCAYUV308920 Transport: Serial, SATA 1.0a, SATA II Extensions, SATA Rev 2.5, SATA Rev 2.6, SATA Rev 3.0


2

You can use lshw. Install it by running sudo apt-get install lshw from Terminal (Ctl+Alt+T), if not installed already. Then from Terminal you can run: $ sudo lshw -C disk *-disk description: ATA Disk product: ST9500325AS vendor: Seagate physical id: 0.0.0 bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0 logical name: ...


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Open terminal Ctrl+Alt+T and type udisksctl status. This will tell you the hardrive model


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Go to the Dash and search for "Disks". You should see one application with that exact name. Open it to get the info you need.


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Your partitioning idea is good 18 GB for / , 2 GB for swap in SSD and 200 GB for /home. You can make a partition for user apps as much as you wish (say 100 GB) and mount it at /usr. This custom partition scheme can be done by choosing "Something else" in Installation Type


0

Oh boy this is a fun one, I went through this more times than I Care to admit :) Disclaimer: I don't have RAID on the Windows Drives, so not sure if it will have any effect Install Windows (you already have it so skip) Boot to Ubuntu USB/CD and go to install When you get to the screen that asks you to automatically or manually partition, select ...


1

I see a problem with your commands: /dev/sdg1 in the 1st error. /dev/sdf in the 2nd error. g-io-error-quark, 19 means "Method name you invoked isn’t known by the object you invoked it on." So I would assume your 1st command has an invalid device and it should be /dev/sdf1. Regarding the superblock error: start here and read the link in post 2 So how ...


0

upon installing Ubuntu it will detect that you have another OS on your hard drive and will ask you weather you want to run Ubuntu along side with it or remove it and install Ubuntu. It will also allow you choose the suitable size for your Ubuntu. Just make sure that you know how much your C drive -in windows- needs in order not to "harm" it.


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Is AHCI enabled in your BIOS? If not then do so and try the hdparm command again. Then it is supposed to work.


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That's a perfect solution! (And kind of the way I run too, except for the Windows) To actually do this, use the following steps: Back up everything! You've been promoted to User type 4 now! ;-) Turn of fast boot/hybrid hibernation under Windows 7 (if set) Boot from the Ubuntu Live DVD Choose "Try Ubuntu" run gparted and resize the Windows partition ...


0

There wouldn't be anything special to do to mount a HFS+ formatted harddrive in the Ubuntu live environment. The drivers are included and the drive will be mounted read only by default. If the drive doesn't show up, it is either defect or something else is wrong with your hardware. In my case it turned out, that the disk wasn't shown because the SATA ...


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I was able to expand it using lvextend -L +XG /dev/HOSTNAME-vg/root As seen here


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I had a similar problem with Windows 8 and Ubuntu. To install grub into sdb you have to choose the partition to install boot-loader as sdb. Since you already installed Xubuntu, you can use Boot-Repair tool to reinstall grub on sdb. Having said that, neither during installation nor with Boot-Repair I could manage to place grub on sdb. No matter what I choose ...


0

In lubuntu you can do as follows: 1- Start Button > Accessories > Disks 2- Start Button > Preferences > Disks


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While I'm not quite sure sure what you exactly mean by "opening your files" and where you were expecting your hard drives to appear, I'll take a stab at it. My guess is that you haven't lost your data. My guess is that you just don't have the disk mounted. If indeed you have multiple hard drives, other than the one you're running ubuntu on, Ubuntu ...


-1

more convenient terminal mounting: udisksctl mount -b /dev/sdg1. (or maybe other block dev name; udiskctl dump prints info to help you find out)


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I've discovered through trial and error that though probably greater than 80% of PCs are Linux compatible, a disturbing percentage simply are not. This is why when asked for advice I always advise putting a PC through its paces either with an Ubuntu boot CD/DVD, or alternately a Ubuntu boot flash drive. I prefer the latter for reasons explained in my bio ...


0

My first assumption is that the sound you are hearing isn't the hard drive at all, but a cooling fan. However, I'll entertain the notion it is your hard drive, and help you to determine if it is actually failing or has something to do with your Ubuntu installation. Please open your Disk Utility and, provided SMART is supported, use that to determine if ...


0

Every Windows system must have its own primary partition and there only can be a maximum of 4 primary + extended partitions. Not 4 each but [number of primary partitions] + [number of extended partitions] <= 4. So put everything which isn't a Windows system partition into an extended partition.


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One formatted in ext3/4 will be treated as an extension of the base root file structure. To resolve your problem with ext2/3/4 devices: sudo chmod -R a+rw /media/name_of_your_80gb_hdd This will have owner = root but allow everyone to have access.


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I did something similar a few days ago- installed Ubuntu on an "external" drive. I installed Ubuntu and the swap partition on the external drive, and the bootloader on my internal drive. Also try when formatting the external drive, I set it up as Ext4, "primary" (not logical). Not sure if any of these are your problem, but everything has been working fine ...


0

Have you tried the "Boot Repair" here. That just might repair the booting problem


0

Turns out the issues was with the RAM. Initially I had 2gb installed but consequently installed an extra 4bg (making 6gb in total). When I removed the extra 4gn it worked, possibly faulty. All installed and working now.


-1

An easy (and not very expensive) option to come around these issues would be to put the storage HDD into an external enclousure (USB or eSATA).


0

You can install the bootloader on the other HDD. Boot a live system and enter lsblk to find out the name of your booting HDD. For me the output is $ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 238.5G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 100M 0 part ├─sda2 8:2 0 79.9G 0 part ├─sda3 8:3 0 1K 0 part ├─sda5 8:5 0 5G ...


0

df -h Copy the location where the drive is mounted. Then enter sudo chmod -R 777 /mounted/on/location


1

To determine whether the problem is the drive or the enclosure, remove the drive from the enclosure, install it in a desktop with sufficient power and check the smart status. For a deeper test, you can check every sector of the drive utilizing tools like ddrescue. ddrescue will report error size during the process and you can attempt data recovery at the ...


0

Although the real cause of the problem was already pointed out, I want to add the same answer, since I have some 4 external HDDs. Any computer that is manufactured, assumes that the power source will be used accordingly to the specifications of the configuration and at most an overload of 20% Any external USB device HAS TO BE POWERED FROM AN EXTERNAL ...


3

What you have is a free fall sensor, (accelerometer) whether it is failing, or giving erroneous data, I'm not sure. I recomend you black list the free fall sensor, and depending on how critical your hard disk drive space is, delete or clear the syslog file as well. sudo > /var/adm/sylog I am suspicious that there is another issue as well, that logs ...


1

First boot to Windows (as you seem to have a dual boot system) and: chkdsk /f X: where X is the drive letter of the FAT partition. then mount with: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/external (no options) and that should fix it...


0

In order to have a separate home partition, set the mountpoint off the HDD as /home when you format it in the Ubuntu Setup.


1

Just install Ubuntu as you normally would and install all updates, but stay away from proprietary software! That way, it'll just boot when you move the HDs as contrarily to Windows, there are no drivers just modules and these are are built into the kernel, so all hardware supported by the kernel will just work out of the box! Once the hard drive is in the ...


0

After a long search I've found what the problem was. When I installed my system I added this line in my fstab: /dev/disk/by-uuid/5E521E0E521DEC11 /mnt/data auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0 I changed it to: /dev/disk/by-uuid/5E521E0E521DEC11 /mnt/data auto nosuid,nodev,gid=1000,umask=007,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0 My groupid is 1000 and the umask ...



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