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2

First, /dev/sda and /dev/sdb are disks, not partitions. (In the Windows world, the term disk is sometimes applied to partitions, but the terms mean different things. A disk is a physical device, such as a disk that's built into a computer or an external disk. A partition is a subdivision of a disk as described in a partition table, which is a simple data ...


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Nope, you don't have to create a partition for every user, instead you just have to move your old /home to your external HDD. By default /home is the place for all user files unless "root" though your user files normally will sit here. For case of permissions by default users can see other files without the ability of changing or modification, if you also ...


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Each message is the failure to add a file to a directory. There is no official limit on the number of file entries in an ext4 directory, but there are 2 articles describing the original design (started in ext2 in 2001) which state the following, and which are just as relevant for ext4: Features found in Linux 2.6: two levels of index nodes are ...


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Caveat: I have not tried this myself What does the INITIAL encryption do in practice? For all data: - Read a bunch of the data - Process it in a special way - Write it back to disk Add the time to null out all free space (write zeroes). Answer: So the processing time should be similar to reading out all contents, then writing it back, with a ...


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Open a terminal and type: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install gksu gksudo nautilus Now copy the files.


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Simple: There is none ;-) Dual-Booting just means that you will on bootup (after powerbutton is prssed and BIOS showed POST messages) be NOT greeted by thw Operating System as you have two installed. Instead you will be given the option to chose which one to start (Actually you can even dual-boot without that chosing-screen but let's ignore that for a ...


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After fooling around with Disks I found a benchmark option. The benchmark can be used to test the read/write speed even if SMART is not supported, this is useful in determining if the hard drive is slow or the installation of your OS is messed up. Click the drive. Click the gears icon. Click "Benchmark..." to benchmark. For what it's worth my ...


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By running applications from your original HDD (even if you'd be able to make it work), you'd bypass the package management (apt). Don't do that! You wouldn't receive any updates on your applications and they might be vulnerable to attacks from outside (for example, your webbrowser) or have unresolved, breaking bugs. If you don't have very limited bandwith, ...


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You have to try some Data Recovery tools which may help you to restore some of your old data. From R-tools Technology: R-Linux is a free data recovery and undelete utility for Ext2FS/3FS (Linux) file systems. File recovery after power failure, system crash, virus infection, or partition reformation, even for the different file system. Unformat and ...


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From waht you can see, that file is actuallty a disk image. You need to convert it to an img file using dmg2img (sudo apt-get install dmg2img), then you can mount the resulting img file in a loop device to browse its content: mount -o loop example.img /home/you/dir


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You erased Windows. Did you do full backup of Windows? If you had also used the Something Else install option on reinstall you would not have had this problem. But auto reinstall erases system. If you have any data you want to try to recover stop using system. You will not be able to recover all data nor workable system. You can try testdisk or photorec, ...


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Assuming the Boot Repair output you posted is still accurate (you note in a comment that you re-installed Ubuntu, but it's not clear if that was before or after you ran Boot Repair), it seems that the GRUB setup scripts are not detecting Windows. There are several things you can try to fix this: You should disable the Windows Fast Startup feature. This ...


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Fast Googling suggests: Windows: chkdisk -f driveletter Linux: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdb2


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The thunderbird files is usually found under home. so in your external HDD it's /home/USERNAME Profile folders are located here: ~/.thunderbird/ However, if you're using a third party build from Ubuntu, those builds located here: ~/.mozilla-thunderbird/ use ctrl+h to view hidden files and search for one of the two dirs above. Inside the dir you can ...


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First, you need to enable the universe repository. If you have not done it already, run: sudo add-apt-repository universe, then update the system with: sudo apt-get update Install the below packages to auto mount your exFAT formatted device: sudo apt-get install exfat-fuse exfat-utils or continue with the manual mount as you were trying.


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Unfortunately, this is not possible unless the SATA controller on your motherboard has it as a feature. I am not aware of any controllers that expose this in their API. Even if it was available, you would need to get into the Linux kernel's SATA driver and code in your access through a system call (or, even better, a /proc filesystem access). In essence, you ...


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You need to disable Fast Boot in Windows 8.1. How Fast Boot works? - Windows 8 doesn't totally shut down when you click the Shut down command. Instead it only partially shuts down and partially hibernates. This is the Hybrid Shutdown part of the equation. Then, when you turn on your computer, Windows 8 starts very quickly because it only has to ...


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Your USB to sata dock doesn't support drives > 2 TiB. You will need to get another one or connect it via sata instead of usb.


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First, if the drive is not shown in fdisk, make sure it is getting enough power,if bus powered. Second, do NOT bother to format in Windows 7. Ubuntu 15 cannot properly recognize NTFS or exFAT drives formatted by Windows 7, at least the 1T SSD I have. And those were the only two choices. Instead, format to NTFS in Ubuntu. I used fdisk to create a simple ...


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Are you sure those files are not in Trash folder? What is your filesystem? And, finally, du lies a lot.


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Using CloneZilla (http://clonezilla.org/) will take care of the details.


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Boot from a live system, plug in the new HDD via USB (or another (s)ata cable, depending on your hardware), and start a 'Terminal'. Check what is the path for your old HDD (probably /dev/sda), and the new one as well (/dev/sdb), and issue this command: sudo dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb Please remember that it will take a long time, and you will not have ...


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The easiest way to do this is by using Gparted from Live CD/USB as suggested above. To do this have a look at the "Copying and pasting a partition" section in the Gparted manual. To reproduce the steps given in the link: To copy a partition: Select an unmounted partition. See the section called “Selecting a Partition”. Choose: Partition → Copy. The ...


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Probably corrupted file system .download easus data recovery wizard application in windows system and try to diagnose the drive. If you are able to see the drive in the wizard, you can select full recover to get it back to normal. And you should be able to perform normal operations on it. I had same kind of problem with my hard drive and this helped , may ...


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hdparm --identify ( or -I ) /dev/device reads and interprets the ATA device IDENTIFY DEVICE data.


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GrUB will write code and data to some devices which will utterly confuse some BIOS USB code. The only thing I found which will make some of my systems not freeze is to format the first partition (e.g., /dev/sdb1) as VFAT (intending it to be used for GrUB boot. And that doesn't work for all of them, but it seems to help with some. I mean, if you don't do ...


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You can try another GUI tool - KVPM. It helped in my case. I successfully resized a logical volume that was mounted as /home on the fly.


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Open a terminal and install ntfs-3g , we need ntfsfix sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g Repair the filesystem sudo ntfsfix /dev/sda4 After that, mount the partition again. Here you can find the manual for the ntfsfix command


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Since sda1 is not in fstab, you must specify the mountpoint, e.g. mount -o barrier=0 /dev/sda1 /mnt then you will be able to find your files in /mnt.


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Your /etc/fstab was not restored and does not contain the necessary statements to mount the partitions on your second hard drive at boot time. To do this, add the following lines to the end of your /etc/fstab: #mount /dev/sdb 1 and 2 at boot time: UUID=6A4C3AF14C3AB7A1 /media/Storage ntfs-3g defaults,noexec,windows_names,locale=en_US.utf8 0 2 ...


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You fixing a corrupted HDD Partition with: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdb2 This is link for you if you not install ntfsfix, you can install with command: sudo apt-get install ntfsfix


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You can write notification specific about ssd cannot mount. I think you can fix with: sudo ntfsfix /dev/<device name(this is disk ssd of you)>


1

GUI solution: Use the gnome-disks utility. You start it by opening the Alt+F2-HUD and entering disks. In the left sidebar you see all available physical disks. Select the one you want to modify here. In the right part of the window, you'll see some general information about the selected disk and its partition structure. When you now click on the menu ...


0

You're vague about this "app" you want to test, so there could be several options. One I can think of is for you to use a virtual machine to do your tests. Create a VM for 12.04 and another for 14.04. Install Ubuntu on those. Once finished, create a "snapshot" of each VM. Install your app and do your tests. When you need to "roll back" to the initial state, ...


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As among others answers to this question explain cloning in general and CloneZilla (as one of the easiest/best tools) specifically can do exactly what you want.


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To install Ubuntu without CD/DVD or USB pendrive, follow these steps: Download Unetbootin from here. Run Unetbootin. Now, from the drop-down menu under Type: select Hard Disk. Next select the Diskimage. Browse to the directory where you downloaded the iso file of Ubuntu. Press OK. Next when you reboot, you will get a menu in that, select Unetbootin and ...


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Take a look for the ubuntu wiki https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation Installation without a CD: Quick Install from USB - A quick guide to installing from a USB memory stick. Intended for less technically-inclined readers. Install from USB - Installing from a USB memory stick (full version). USB stick + grub - Similar to above ...


0

check the table with supported USB Devices ... the switch -d sat indicates, that it's supposed to be a drive with SATA port. there are specific switches for certain USB bridges - lsusb might show the concrete name. if the bridge controller might have a bad implementation - just try to connect it native through SATA instead of USB. SCSI and ATA (according ...


0

External drives (via USB, I assume) are tricky with SMART. Some don't work at all. The smartmontools people posted a list of hard drives with command-line switches to add to smartctl (see fifth column). For Seagate Expansion drives in particular, it looks like you need either -d sat or -d sat,12. Try the following: sudo smartctl -d sat --all /dev/sdb ...


3

The cp way The command: sudo cp -ax /media/hdd/ /media/ssd/ copies the folder hdd, the command: sudo cp -ax /media/hdd/* /media/ssd/ copies the files and sub-folders of the folder hdd. Use: shopt -s dotglob for considering dot files. The rsync way rsync -az -H --delete --numeric-ids /media/hdd/ /media/ssd/


0

When you copy something to a file, it overwrites the file if it exists. When you copy something to a directory, it could be rather dangerous to destroy everything that might currently be in the directory to replace it with new contents, so it copies into the directory. That's why hdd is being copied into the ssd directory. If you instead do sudo cp -ax ...


1

Having physical access to an unencrypted hard drive definitely allows an attacker to gain access to your files. So the best way to protect your data is to use full disk encryption. If your hard drive support drive locking , you can enable that. You can read a little bit about it here: http://security.stackexchange.com/a/33419 There's also another way to ...


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Yes. If you have physical access, then you own the computer. Full encryption is the only option to prevent that - and that includes denying you access if the key goes missing. Otherwise, you just mount the drive (or it's image) in a PC where you are root...


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Don't know what an sshd is (related to storage) ... did you mean SSD? There are 50+ different ways to do this. dd ddrescue partimage clonezilla fsarchiver gparted rsync any normal backup/recovery too So the best answer for you will depend on your skillz with any of the above commands AND how good you are in correcting the /etc/fstab after the restore to ...


1

You will need to have both partitions mounted, for instance on /old and /new. Then use the rsync utility: rsync -aruv /old/* /new/ If the old partition is your root system, you will want not to copy over the contents of some directories. Just exclude them, such as: rsync -aruv /* /new/ --exclude=/dev/* --exclude=/proc/* --exclude=/run/* --exclude=/sys/* ...


2

I keep my /home on the SSD, but some directories under my user(s) are symbolic linked to /data disk. Like ~/Downloads, ~/Dropbox, ~/VirtualBox VM's, etc... Because then all the cache directories of the user can be accessed quickly, and the 'data'-directories can't fill up the root suddenly. For example when you create a VM in Virtual box with 64GB disk for ...


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It is possible to do that. HOWEVER: If the drive is actually failing, then you will eventually lose everything you put on it. If it's just the boot sector that is bad, then it should work fine. Use 'Disks' inside Ubuntu to format it with an EXT4 filesystem (or something else if you like) and it will show up just like a thumb drive. You can also use this ...


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You say you are stuck with Windows as your OS. Does this mean you cannot boot from a Live CD? If you could boot from a GNU/Linux Live CD (such as Ubuntu), you could then check if the USB is formatted correctly (or re-format using gparted) without affecting the contents of your computer's hard drive. HTH.


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Try looking at CloneZilla. There is a guide to do just this Here. It runs on a live cd (Or DVD, flash drive, etc.) which is to your advantage because you don't need to be using your hard drive which is what you're cloning. Or if you just want to fix GRUB: Boot up the computer off of the 1 TB drive into ubuntu Log in Open a terminal run sudo update-grub ...


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I went into 'disks', and was able to open and edit the mount options. I changed the filesystem type to 'auto' and saved. Hit 'mount' and lo and behold, it worked. I was so caught up trying to find a way to do it by the terminal, I forgot to try the obvious.



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