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-1

Ubuntu installer either runs in UEFI mode or in BIOS mode. If you want both of your hard disks to be detected, partition tables of both should be same. Then boot either in UEFI mode or in BIOS mode (according to your partition table).


0

First disconnect the harddrive, then go to the terminal and execute:sudo fdisk -l now connect your harddrive and again execute:sudo fdisk -l. Compare the output of both commands. You'll notice the second attempt produces a little more output and this is your hard drive. Then you can mount it using the mount command like:mount /dev/sdx /media/mount. /dev/sdx ...


1

It looks like your Windows system was hibernated and not actually shut down. That causes issues for Linux's ntfs3g driver. So, you need to boot back into Windows and shut it down cleanly. In their infinite wisdom, the Microsoft developers decided to make it hard for users to shut down their machines. According to this site, you need to: Mouse over ...


0

Is Ubuntu LVM using some sort of RAID underneath? No, not so far as I know (although it is possible to configure LVM on top of RAID i.e. with one or more RAID arrays as physical volumes - I assume you didn't do that). If not, what would be the reason why the data recovery service would need all of my drives to make the recovery? Possibly just that ...


-1

Try this: Boot the computer from Ubuntu. Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T You must determine whether your system was booted in EFI or in BIOS mode. Run it: sudo ls /sys/firmware If the system was booted off of EFI, the /sys/firmware/efi directory exist, like this: acpi memmap efi If the /sys/firmware/efi directory does not appear, it was booted ...


4

If you're talking about something like https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Disk_cloning#Create_disk_image you see # dd if=/dev/sdX conv=sync,noerror bs=64K | gzip -c > /path/to/backup.img.gz Which is getting the data, passing it through gzip, and writing it to a file. Now, watch this: # dd if=/dev/sdX conv=sync,noerror bs=64K > /path/to/backup.img ...


2

You can not create more than 4 primary partitions. You need to remove one of the existing partitions and create one extended partition. Then you will be able to create many logical partitions inside it. In your case the easiest way will be to re-install Ubuntu. Your partitioning is wrong and it will take lots of effort get it right. There is absolutely ...


0

As of now, technology doesn't exist that can link two different motherboards hard drives. That cable that you bought was meant for file transfers, like .jars, .zips, etc. So with that cable, no you will not be able to link the hard drives, unless you tamper with it.


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My solution was to get a recovery ISO built by a support tech who had access to my machine's encryption XML file. Third item you need is McAfee's daily recovery code. After fully decrypting the Win7 partition, I was able to boot without issue. My scenario I had was a dual boot Xubuntu / Win7 setup. GRUB gave access to either OS flawlessly. Afterwards, ...


0

All problems Got solved when I disabled Secure boot from my BIOS setup. Thanks for all the replies though !


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Use gparted to reformat the drive to ext4 (YOU WILL LOSE ALL THE DATA SO BACK ANY PERSONAL STUFF UP, although there should be no personal data because it won't boot yet). Make sure the partition scheme is an MS dos or BIOS type partition scheme (you need an MBR!). Create one big ext4 partition. Repeat the installation.


2

GUI tools to make partitions automount From your comment, I understand the GUI tool did not add anything to your fstab file. In general, I am not very fond of GUI tools to edit fstab; many times unnecessary options are added or errors occur. Making an ntfs partition automount, using the uuid Since making an ntfs partition automount is relatively simple, I ...


0

If you want to see progress, and also don't mind the command line, PV is your friend. I'm trying out Ubuntu MATE on my Raspberry Pi 2, and I wanted to backup my SD card and write the new one, but I hate running a big IO without knowing what's going on. This is what worked most quickly: $ sudo su # pv /dev/sdb | xz > my-pi.img.xz # pv ...


1

As several people have mentioned, the issue is likely due to the plex user not having the correct permissions. I had a similar problem, and was able to fix it using a few easy steps. Open this config file: sudo nano /etc/default/plexmediaserver Find this line: PLEX_MEDIA_SERVER_USER = plex Replace plex with your username, and save the file. Once I ...


1

Chances are you need to repair the Windows 7 disk from within Windows. There are no tools in Ubuntu that can do this job. (The ntfsfix program does only the most basic checks and then flags the partition as needing repair in Windows.) Also, be sure you shut down the computer in Windows; do not perform a suspend-to-disk operation. The latter leaves the ...


0

Without solution, I was left with the only option to run repeatdly sudo smartctl -t short /dev/sdb to stop the HDD to make that noise. The only thing I found to stop that tick noise. Most of the time, it was after resuming from sleep. I ended up with 15 run of smartctl per day if not more. Then I made minor change to my setup. I created a LUKS partition on ...


0

Ubuntu (the Linux kernel) can handle both RAID-1 or RAID-5. Either of them can tolerate the failure of one disk. It will also tell you which drive is no longer in function. Yes the recovery process is automatic: all you have to do is to add a new disk to your degraded (i.e., faulty) RAID array. You can even grow your RAID-5 array that is add new disks to ...


1

The Linux kernel supports software RAID (https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/SoftwareRAID) or even Logical Volume Management (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lvm) without any cards or extra hardware. It depends what sort of RAID you want to implement, but basically the steps are: install the new drive, and create a new, degraded array (that is only the ...


0

Going along with alb3rtano0012, used gparted sudo apt-get install gparted Then just use search bar to open it and create new partitions after that do df You should see all your storage. Go into gparted and see what your partitions are called. Then do sudo gedit /etc/fstab You should see a line at the bottom that looks like this: ...


0

You can format it in every readable aand writeable format like ext2/3/4 for just Linux as the're native for it and if used by Windows too - to FAT32 or NTFS. Tgen you may just move files/folders. The file manager is able to mount the partition just with one click. The formatting may easily be done with GParted. To install it, use the following command: ...


0

Here is a one liner to identify the 200 largest dirs / files cd / sudo du -k | sort -n | tail -200 This will let you identify potential monster files U no longer need. ubuntu itself and any normal install will fit nicely under 10 gigs so if you are filling up 300+ gig it is probably movies/photos or other media which is probably not needed on a daily ...


0

In order to have the drive available to Ubuntu, you would have to format the drive in a Linux friendly format (ext,xfs), as well as update your /etc/fstab in order for Ubuntu to actually mount and use the drive for storage. However, if youre planning on using both drives to hold system files (/usr, /etc, /opt...), thats a bit more complex. ...


3

HDD technology uses a magnetic process for data manipulation and storage. This process is noninvasive, meaning you can pretty much manipulate data on a disk drive infinitely. That is until the mechanics start to fail. In contrast SSD technology does not run the risk of mechanical failure. But what is a concern is how it stores it's data. For data storage ...


3

Still today Flash RAM cells built in SSDs have a limited lifespan. Every write (not read) cycle or better every erasure wears a memory cell and at some time it will stop working. The amount of erase cycles a cell can survive is highly variable, and flash from modern SSDs will do much better than some years ago. In addition the intelligent firmware will take ...


3

Early SSDs had a reputation for failing after fewer writes than HDDs. If the swap was used often, then the SSD may fail sooner. This might be why you heard it could be bad to use an SSD for swap. Modern SSDs don't have this issue, and they should not fail any faster than a comparable HDD. Placing swap on an SSD will result in better performance than placing ...


0

I think it's because SSD drives are like flash memory, where they wear out the more you have read and write cycles. Swap would make that so much worse, since swap is constantly writing to the swap file.


0

Use lsblk to list all the drives and find yours /dev/sdx. Run the following: # dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sdx bs=8M && sync Replace x with the drive you want to wipe. Run it multiple times if you're paranoid (eject and reinsert the drive each time to ensure that the data gets flushed). This will erase everything, so be careful. I mean it. It's ...


2

The best way to wipe a SSD is to issue an ATA SECURE_ERASE command rather than using low-level utilities such as dd, because it's faster and more reliable, due to a number of reasons. Run lsblk and determine to which block device the drive is currently mapped (if you have only that drive attached it will likely be mapped to /dev/sda) Run sudo hdparm -I ...


1

Here's an example from my fstab to mount a 2nd internal drive (it's a legacy Windows drive, hence the mountpoint name and file system type) UUID=01D0465A0EE56520 /media/Win-G ntfs defaults 0 0 Here are the properties for the mount point. Note that root owns it, but other users have read/write/delete permissions.


0

Windows 7 include a built-in functionality in Disk Management to shrink and expand partitions. To get to this utility, open up Control Panel, and type in partition into the search box.. you’ll immediately see the link Administrative Tools In the Disk Management screen, just right-click on the partition that you want to shrink, and select Shrink Volume from ...


0

You can install Ubuntu from a live cd/dvd/usb to an empty hard drive or even one that contains another OS. But this apparently isn't an option in your computer. So you need to find an external cd or dvd reader. There are other more unusual options:If you have a hard drive with a fully installed and working copy of Ubuntu on it you can insert that hard drive ...


1

The drivers should be included with the standard linux kernel and there should be nothing to install. Unlike windows, most drivers are included in the mainline kernel. You will notice you don't have to wait for "installing device drivers" every time you plug something into the USB port. That is not to say that you will never need to install any firmware ...


0

Step 1: start an SSH server running on the Ubuntu machine. Once you do that you can mount it as a hard drive. Take a look at Dokan SSHFS: http://dokan-dev.net/en/download/ Dokan SSHFS is a program that mounts remote file systems using SSH. You will need to install the MSVC 2005 redistributable: ...


0

no need for any external software just try this... sudo hdparm -I /dev/sda | grep Rotation output would be like Nominal Media Rotation Rate: 5400 cheers.


0

Looks like your disk is not mounted at boot, so you must click it in Ubuntu first to mount it before it will show in any applications. You will need some information for it to auto-mount, first the name of the disk ie dev/sda or dev/sdb and also a location to mount the disk (I will use your home folder for this example,system default is /media) First back ...


0

If you're able to boot into Ubuntu on the VM your issue is likely with your vdi setup. If you're new to VirtualBox this can be tricky, not to mention if you're new to Linux. You should take a look at this for how to set up the new vdi and partition/format/mount it in Linux: http://www.vitalsofttech.com/add-disk-storage-to-oracle-virtualbox-with-linux/ If ...


-1

On Linux you might have to login via terminal and use sudo. To go backwards you can use something like cd down cd Volumes/.../ //or cd up cd /.../Volumes cd .../Volumes //spaces in file name cd /Volumes/My\Documents FYI dev is your firmware and device files. On other Unix OSs' like Mac OS X they have created permission blocks on viewing those. ...


1

To the best of my knowledge, there are no Linux NTFS repair utilities. The ntfsfix tool might seem to be one, but it does only the most rudimentary checks and then flags the partition for repair in Windows. Thus, your best bet is to do the repair under Windows, and to ask about it on a Windows forum. If you use a disk exclusively in Linux, NTFS is a poor ...


1

External USB enclosures often do one of two things with over-2TiB disks: They convert from 512-byte sectors to 4096-byte sectors, thus enabling the disk (up to 16TiB) to be accessed via 32-bit pointers. This works fine so long as the disk is accessed only from the external enclosure. Disks must not be swapped back and forth between such enclosures and ...


0

Ehhh, never reboot like that. You likely corrupted your HDD, and you need to run this at the command line: sudo fsck -a /dev/sda If that runs and output no errors then your HDD is OK. If it outputs errors, then it should automatically attempt to fix them. If it can, all should be well. If it didn't output any errors and still doesn't work, then please ...


0

You may want to try the following:Boot from a live CD/DVD/USB and then select the option to manually install Ubuntu. Now choose the correct options to mount the root partition to / and the home partition to /home. Make sure you DO NOT select the option to format those partitions, Now choose the option to mount the boot partition to /boot and now you DO ...


1

From a command line prompt use the copy command. You need the path to your USB device. Syntax cp source destination cp dir1 dir2 cp -option source destination cp -option1 -option2 source destination From your question, you want cp -r /home/username/Documents /usb_backup_destination cp -r /home/username/Downloads /usb_backup_destination and, so on ...


0

cp item directory is how you copy files into a directory. If you want to copy a directory, make sure to use the -r argument. Type in man cp for more info.


2

When you click a drive in Nautilus, it automatically mounts to /media/user1/FooDrive. "user1" is the name of user you are logged with. If you logout and login with another "user2", the drive will be still mount to the same place. And user2 will not see it. You can fix this by running sudo umount /media/user1/FooDrive if this was the mount point. Then if ...


3

On OS X those would be the mount points. Under Ubuntu you would want to look at /media/USERNAME/ for those. Though if the volume has not been mounted you could look at /dev/disk/by-label. If the drives are paritioned and formatted, then you can navigate to them by doing something like cd /media/USERNAME/LABEL where USERNAME is your user name and LABEL is ...


0

One of the function keys F8, F10, F11, or F12 should give you the boot menu options when the machine is booting up. Just pick the right disk and it should boot the OS on that disk. You might have to set the bios to allow for on-the-fly boot disk selection, it can be disabled sometimes. Since you have the OSs installed on two separate disks, then the BIOS ...


0

Yes, it is possible. Since you've Windows 8.1 already installed, just start the installer of Ubuntu and proceed. It should detect Windows 8.1 and offer an option to install Ubuntu too.


0

Clonezilla is great, but if you ever need to restore to a smaller partition it becomes a pain. I prefer to use fsarchiver, which quickly creates very compressed backups that can be deployed anywhere you need them. There's a neat PDF with a recommended backup model found here: https://github.com/issmirnov/dotfiles/blob/master/bin/fsarchiver/backup-ver2.pdf ...


1

I would recommend using GParted since you will have a visual cue of what is going on. In GParted, you will have list of partitions on a particular disk. You can make your preferred changes to a disk or partition and apply those changes when done. I read your other question and it seems there might be a problem with the bootable USB you created. If you have ...


0

try to fix it from commandline with sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdc1 unless your windows is hibernated: in this case, as Rinzwind suggested you, boot in Windows and shut down properly. Cheers, Silvia



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