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The answer to your first question is yes, but then replacing your previous hdd with the newly installed hdd may cause severe problems. As an example consider that you installed Ubuntu in new HDD when connected externally and grub was installed in old HDD, when you remove old HDD and replace it with new HDD, it won't boot any OS because grub is missing. If ...


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Before Installing Ubuntu Disable Secure Boot in BIOS setting and Disable Fast Shutdown in Windows. Note : Read step 10 carefully, the image of step 10 doesn't show what is written Follow these steps : Step 1 : Download ubuntu 14.04 from here Step 2: Create a bootable usb stick on windows (Click here for guide) Step 3: Attach external HDD to USB (if not ...


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Reading through that guide, /dev/sda is mounted at mnt, and you are still in directory mnt/recovery at the point you try to unmount it. You can't umount it because you are still using it, so change directory first:- cd ~ and then sudo umount /dev/sda and it should unmount. If not, edit your question to include what happened.


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You could try: sudo umount -l /mountpoint/of/your/partition -l forces the partition to unmount even if it is in use / busy.


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The new utility fatrace can show you exactly! See: https://launchpad.net/fatrace/ or run 'sudo apt-get install fatrace'. Then run it: # sudo fatrace chrome(6514): W /home/xxxx/.config/google-chrome/Default/Current Session chrome(6516): R /home/xxxx/.pki/nssdb/cert9.db chrome(6514): RW /home/xxxx/.cache/google-chrome/Default/Cache/data_0 chrome(6516): R ...


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I don't know what's going on, but the only thing that helped me with ext4 drive was setting in "Disks" app "Automatic Mount Options" - "OFF" and setting "Mount Point" "/mnt/foobar" instead of "/media/username/foobar".


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Try this, I just did this on the weekend for my father in law and it worked like a charm. Hopefully it will work for you as well. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MountingWindowsPartitions


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Ummm, if I were presented by this particular problem, I would google on how to use a network bootloader to load a boot image off a networked drive, to then have the machines boot over the network. As for the requirements, you will need standard LAN cards, Cat5 or Cat5e cable, a high speed switch at each floor node (assuming you have a server room located ...


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I had the same problem. More or less by accident, I noticed that whenever I had GMail open in a browser, a rattling hard drive would be the result. In my case, if GMail would be running in Google Chrome, Opera, Safari or Vivaldi, it would result in constant rattling. In Firefox, it would still cause some hard drive access. I ended up with Midori, and now my ...


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I supposed you SATA controlled/ motherboard supports hot-plug and you are using Debian/Ubuntu system. To force a rescan on scsi ( each sata port apperas as a scsi bus), you must write "0 0 0" in each hostX controller in /sys/class/scsi_host/host<X>/scan (you must be root user) How to do it on all hosts: for i in `ls /sys/class/scsi_host/` ; do echo ...


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I had the exact same problem and could solve it by using the Ubuntu live option and typing "sudo gparted" in the shell (Strg+Alt+T) and then just setting the flag of the Ubuntu partition to boot (right click on the Ubuntu partition and setting the marker to "manage flags"), since the Windows partitions flag was set to boot until then. After a reboot ...


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I worked out a solution myself: Quick answer Assuming that your drive is /dev/sdX: Run dd if=/dev/zero | cmp - /dev/sdX to spot the first non-zero byte of the device: in my case it was byte 742300476649 Calculate to which block does the first non-zero byte belong to: ...


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Solution: Two options here Install Ubuntu in a HDD with another Operative System. Install Ubuntu in a HDD which have data. 1. Install Ubuntu in a HDD with another Operative System: Start by going to ubuntu.com. On the homepage, scroll down and click the red "Get Ubuntu Now" button. Under "Ways to get Ubuntu", select "Download and Install". This ...


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Note the comments about using a more current version of the ISO, but your problem may be that you have a separate /home partition. Assuming your "newinstall" is a user home directory, the partition starts with /newinstall,,, not /home in the line set isofile="/newinstall/kubuntu-14.10-desktop-amd64.iso" loopback loop (hd1,6)$isofile The other potential ...


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You just increased the capacity of the physical file (or virtual disk), you still need to modify the partition table contained inside the virtual disk. You'll need to mount the ISO file used for the installation on your VirtualBox. Start a live session and execute GParted It should be fairly easy with the graphical interface. If for any reason GParted is ...


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Try this: Launch parted as superuser: in a terminal: sudo parted /dev/sdd (you will be prompted for your sudo password) Create a new partition table: in parted: mklabel gpt Exit: in parted: q And see if now gparted is able to handle the device


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Gparted will be needed for the following. And a Ubuntu live USB/CD/DVD. Provided the windows and Ubuntu partitions are next to each other, you should be able to delete the windows partition by right clicking on it and clicking delete, then right clicking the Ubuntu partition, select the resize/move option and using up the space windows originally had.


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It might be or might not be possible depending on your partition layout. You can install GParted from Ubuntu Software Center and try to delete the Windows partition and make some free space. Then you might be able to Extend the size of the Ubuntu partition. You should do this using an Ubuntu Live CD. You have proceed with caution. You may want to read ...


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Yes, hybrid drives work by storing pretty much all of the data on the magnetic disk while using the SSD portion to cache commonly used data so you can access it much quicker than if you were to get it directly from the magnetic disk. On most hybrid drives this is done by the firmware on disk at a base level and doesn't involve the OS or drivers in any way at ...


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Yes. According to their site, Ubuntu with a GUI only requires 5GB of Hard Disk storage, although any other programs you may install will be above and beyond this total.


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You have (at least) one bad block (LBA 5642528) that's causing repeated errors. You can try to: 1: backup your entire hard disk 2: reformat/repartition your disk using the LONG method to try and make it map out the bad block(s). This could take many hours to complete. 3: restore your hard disk or 1: replace the hard disk Cheers, Al


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You could partition your SSD and install the OS there. This will give you the quick startup time you desire. What sort of things do you plan to install on the Ubuntu partition? If you run out of space and have to start installing on the slower drive then your speed will be limited to that of the slower drive anyway.


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If you have two hard drives, then installing Windows on one and Ubuntu (or any other OS) on the other is the most convenient. most modern Windows PC's come with three partitions already installed - a recovery partition, the "System Reserved" partition, and finally your primary Windows partition. If only 3 Primary partitions are defined, create an extended ...


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To my knowledge, there are no files in Ubuntu which store or are dependent on the physical characteristics of the hard drive. All the information about the partitions is stored in the MBR and other data structures, which are outside of any filesystems (doing otherwise would create a chicken-and-egg problem, right? :)). The only file which comes to mind is ...


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I just had a similar issue when trying to dual boot windows 7 with Ubuntu 14.04 and after several problems, I finally figured out that the HDD was dying when in the windows drive selection part of the setup showed one of the disks offline. I'm no expert but if your drive is old enough, that may be a possibility. I've seen a couple of threads on forced ...


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It would statistically be less safe to install onto two separate drives. If one drive fails you lose half of your data. Conversely, installing both OSs to one drive and keeping the (hypothetical?) second drive as a backup drive would give you a form of redundancy should one drive fail. As far as your system is concerned, it doesn't matter if you partition ...


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Go to a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T type: sudo apt-get install gksudo gksudo gedit /etc/fstab put a # in front of the line that has mnt/5dae46e774ac431f in it type sudo mount -a If you get no errors, you will not get any at the next reboot neither.


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From a strict system point of view, it is exactly the same ... provided you correctly configure your partitions. Correctly configured partitions are perfectly safe to use and you will never inadvertantly erase date in one partition while working on another one - be they under same OS or not. If you configure them by hand hacking the Master Boot Record with ...


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In general, they should leave each other alone. If you do the install correctly (Windows first, then Linux, as a rule, because Linux is more 'considerate'). As far as I am aware, there is no additional risk involved in sharing a drive. Having said that, here are some gotchas to watch out for. 1) Windows will not be able to see the contents of your Linux ...


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It is safer to use 2 hard disks. during formatting it is easier to recognize the different hard disks. 1 will be named sda and the other sdb. Though the installer puts names next to bootable partitions it does help to find other partitions that belong to that specific OS (like a D: drive will be sda2 on sda where sda1 is the OS for Windows or db2 is a ...


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Short answer: It doesn't matter at all. Detailed answer: There is absolutely no risk with keeping two operating systems on the same disk device. You can mess with another system partition as long as the disk device with that partition is accesible, putting it on separate physical device doesn't make it safer (nor less safe) in any way.


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To boot your external hard drive, you can set it as first hard drive in BIOS, or try hitting F12, (or similar), when booting, to get an option to boot it. Once it is running you can access the internal drive using Files, (the file manager like app).


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I would suggest you use the rsync command to do this. Copy-pasting is not useful in case your operation fails and you need to resume at some point. Moreover, rsync can tell you what it is doing. The command would be rsync -azv --progress /old-location /new-location. If the rsync command fails for some reason, just repeat the command. Rsync will happily move ...


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if your problem is grub not showing up, then use the following commands: sudo grub-install /dev/sdX Where X after the sd is the partition name you installed windows or ubuntu on(Your default HDD) Then simply do sudo update-grub If this is not your problem, just follow the following link. Hope this helps! ...


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When trying to mount a remote Ubuntu FDE drive while your current Ubuntu installation is also using FDE, both LVMs will have the same Volume Group name ubuntu-vg. This makes the second drive with the same volume name inaccessible do to a naming clash. This can be resolved by renaming the Volume Group name of the remote FDE drive: Boot to a live instance ...


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Ensure your computer is plugged into the power Make a System Backup (You've just been promoted to User type 4) Boot from an Ubuntu Live-DVD or a gparted Live-CD Start gparted and you will see something like this: Click the right side of /dev/sda7 and drag it to the left (="shrink partition") Move the partitions around, so there is enough space to: ...


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I've always used tee for specifying multiple targets although I don't recommend exceeding the number of available cores. dd is rather intensive regarding it's use of resources. cat source.dd | tee >(dd of=/dev/sda) >(dd of=/dev/sdb) >(dd of=/dev/sdc) | dd of=/dev/sdd I did this several years ago for mass duplicating some 4GB USB sticks on USB2 ...


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First of all check if the system can see your disk with the lsblk command. if it does you need to gather the volume name from the command in your case its sdb. And the partition you want is sdb2. Then if the system does not see it, it means that you have to mount it. Create a mounting point: sudo mkdir /media/sdb2 Mount the drive: sudo mount /dev/sdb2 ...


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Solved I used fdisk -l to show the partitions and then: fdisk /dev/sdb n p 1 [enter] [enter] w and then: mkfs-ntfs -f /dev/sdb1 in that order to partition the drive. obviously if anyone used they replace sdb and sdb1 to their ownif needed.


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You're just being limited by the internal transfer rate of the PCI bus of your computer. If you want higher speeds, you'll have to stop using a PC and upgrade to server hardware. For further information see Intel's specifications sheet for the C220 Series Chipset. Furthermore, you don't need to develop this software as it already exists: CloneZilla ...


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You're affected by this bug:https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/linux-lts-raring/+bug/1271430 The best thing you can do is add yourself to the bug list so that you will be informed when the bug gets fixed. In the mean time: it's just an annoyance...


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I've been running various Linux distros alongside Windows (XP, Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, and now 10) without any real issues. I've ran both OSes on the same HDD and now I'm running each on a separate SSD. On my work machine at the office I have Linux running on an SSD and Windows 7 on an HDD. Without a technical definition for bad this is as technical as I can ...


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No that's not bad. You can run dual OS on a same machine, given you have enough hardware support. But that would require you to reboot your machine every time you want to switch OS. Another option could be, you can use a Virtual Machine, that can run Ubuntu on it. The reason I would recommend VM to you is that, you can easily use 2 OSs at the same time ...


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What kind of sound does it make? If it's clicking you hear, then your OS MIGHT ACTUALLY BE DESTROYING YOUR HDD. The problem is ages old and involves Advanced Power Management feature parking/unparking the disk too aggressively. Try using hdparm to check the APM value (-B param). If it's less then 254, set it to 254 and check if it helps with the noise. If it ...


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Depending on what you are trying to do, I am guessing what it looks like to me that when you are done with the drive you want to keep it plugged in but not mounted. So what I would advise you to do is to open the menu and search "Disks" (Ubuntu 14.04/10) if your disk is there, instead of clicking Safely remove I would just click on the pause button on that ...


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Unless the drive was old and getting ready to crap out anyway I doubt if a failed install could destroy it. You don't need to change anything in the bios if it was working before. Change IDE back to ahci. In your bios make sure you haven't inadvertently disabled your drive. Make sure it still shows up in the boot order. Save and exit bios amd retry the ...


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Running hdparm -y /dev/sdb as root will cause the disk to stop spinning. If anything access the disk, it will spin up again. The man page suggest this is only useful for IDE drives. However I have tested that it does work with a USB drive attached to a Dell running 14.04. The man page says the command will usually cause the drive to spin down, which ...


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I have three equally valid solutions from which you can take your pick. My personal solution is to buy a use hub featuring a power switch for each port. I find it amazingly handy. If I recall, it cost only about $6 on amazon. I'll see if I can find you the item for sale before I post this, but it is enough to tell you such an affordable device exists. ...


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If your desktop does something fishy, you cal always fallback on the terminal. sudo umount /dev/sdXY # (this will umount, it will complain on opened files, if so lsof and see which ones.) sudo sync # ( this flushes all buffers to disk. It will ensure that no data is lingering in ram.) sudo eject /dev/sdX # ( this works on dvd/cds and some, not all usb ...


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Unplug the USB cable should do it. If not, then plug it back in and safely remove it again until it stays off.



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