New answers tagged

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it means in general that your device has been already mounted (automatically, for example, when detected).Depending on what displays 'mount' command, you can 'umount' your device, and then try to remount it as you want.


-1

Your question is not directly Linux/Ubuntu related, so I will only direct you to some sites that may be able to help you. Just know that if you use the programs I am going to suggest, you do so at your own risk. If the drives are really totally gone and these tools on the sites cannot help you there are companies that can do data recovery including taking ...


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For anybody curious I did solve this. First I determined that the charset on the old VFAT drive was ISO-8859-1 (very common for Windows). I then executed a rsync command with the option to convert the old charset to UTF-8 and that did the trick. Example: rsync -vaW --size-only --iconv=ISO-8859-1,utf-8 /media/Music/* '/media/username/Seagate Backup Plus ...


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I have a Seagate 1TB 5400RPM 64MB SATA 9,5MM Laptop Thin SSHD 8GB Flash, ST1000LM014 in my Samsung laptop, works perfectly and the speed up is noticeable. In theory this kind of disks should be perfectly equivalent to a normal disk at least at the basic "it works" level (it can create problems in seek optimization, but this is not in my experience). There ...


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I wrote an answer for a similar issue you can check it out here. The settings with grub can be changed so it doesn't show the menu at boot time if you choose .. you need to edit the /etc/default/grub file and after you make the changes you need to run sudo update-grub or an easier way is to google Grub Customizer for a graphical interface.


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According this page http://en.community.dell.com/techcenter/os-applications/f/4613/t/19679184, you have to change the IRST(Intel Rapid Storage Technology) mode to "AHCI mode" in your BIOS. With this mode, the SSD driver should be visible.


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You cant use sleep / hibernate / hybrid sleep with Windows if you want access to a drive that is being used by Windows. If you want access to the drive in Ubuntu ... you will need to do a full shutdown "Start / Shutdown/ Shutdown my computer". If you still have issues you will need to disable fast startup located under Power Options then choose what the ...


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In answer to your first question: You can find out how to auto-mount NTFS partitions on boot here.


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The minimum requirement is 5GB, not 25. You'll be fine with 10GB, although you might have to delete old kernels every now and then.


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Had the same problem with almost the exact same hardware. The issue was with the SATA mode. It needs to be changed to AHCI mode in the BIOS settings. This can be done with the instructions found here, printed below for completeness. Run Command Prompt as Admin Invoke a Safe Mode boot with the command: bcdedit /set {current} safeboot minimal ...


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What is in your fstab file? You can check it using sudo nano /etc/fstab (you can replace nano with gedit, or any other text editor) Each line should start with UUID=xxxx and you shouldn't see any reference to /dev/sda or /dev/sdb If you need to know the UUID, run this command to list them blkid


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You have several options. Considering the disk for storing backup is of same size (or larger) as the source disk and is mounted, then you can use the following tools in the form on a script which runs periodically using cron. Advantage to such cloning for backup is that, if your source hard-drive fails you can simply use the backup drive and it will retain ...


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You can't install TLP and laptop-mode-tools at the same time (the tlp package conflicts with the laptop-mode-tools package to prevent parallel install). I understand you want to have the equivalent of NOLM_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS=7200 # 2 hours LM_AC_HD_POWERMGMT=1 NOLM_AC_HD_POWERMGMT=1 This translates to DISK_APM_LEVEL_ON_AC="1" ...


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On your external harddrive, the master file table (MFT) and its copy (MFTMirr) are seemingly no longer consistent. You might want to fix it using the Linux tool ntfsfix on the command line. Connect the hard drive to your System.Open a terminal by CTRLALT+t. To sum it up Enter sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdb1 in the terminal and press Enter. You will be asked for ...


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To do multiple partition backup, you can use: Clonezilla. Its very reliable and stable. Also you can use Bacula. Bacula is a set of computer programs that permit managing backup, recovery, and verification of computer data across a network of computers of different kinds. Based on Source Forge downloads, Bacula is the most popular Open Source backup ...


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I personally use Grsync, which is a GUI wrapper on rsync, to backup my D: drive. You could create a backup rule for each partition and script them to run nightly.


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A good option might be the built-in backup utility, Deja-Dup. You will have to do a little configuring to make sure all the folders you care about are included, but it provides a straightforward GUI to do so. Once you are set up, it will do a full backup. It will then do incremental backups whenever you like. Every 90 days or so it will do another full ...


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Knowing how to setup and reliably restore a backup is something every user should know. Go to the System Settings panel, to Backups (the black safe), and configure a back-up there. Using a removable drive is very easy: plug in your drive, start Backups, choose the "Storage Location" panel in the left menu, and use the top drop-down menu to choose the ...


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If you will decide to apply a solution from @Frank's post (shrinking + installing Windows), good insurance is making an image of entire drive before that operation. It's hard to predict what Windows will do... Boot frome Live CD, open gnome-disc-utility (it should be in system menu), select your drive, click on a three-lines icon on top right and use ...


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http://www.everydaylinuxuser.com/2015/11/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-alongside.html https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot you can shrink your ubuntu volume from a live usb/cd then install windows. if you do this correctly you should not lose any data. it is easier to just copy your files to your external drive as a backup. It is also possible ...


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That is becuase MBR disks only support a maximum of four primary partitions. Use an extended partition for Ubuntu & swap instead.


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You can't resize a partition while it's mounted. You have to unmount it first. One simple way to do that is to boot from a live USB and use a tool like GParted to resize your partitions. The arrow at the left suggests that sda5 is a child partition of sda2. think of it as a folder inside a folder.


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You won't be able to edit your filesystem from a local boot - you'll have to use livecd if this is root hdd, which it appears to be. The reason that there are 2 partitions of the same size is because sda2 is the root partition for sda5. In other words, just as sda1 and sda2 are subpartions of sda, sda5 is a subpartition of sda2. sda2 contains sda5.


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First determine what is the filesystem of your external hard disk. You need these packages for the following Windows filesystems: exFAT: exfat-fuse NTFS: ntfs-3g FAT32: already built in the kernel Install the corresponding packages by running sudo apt install <package>. If the disk is not automatically mounted when plugging in the disk, mount it at ...


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I eject, then unplug any usb HDD without any problem. Problem could appear if unplugging before the end of writing on the disk → eject first.


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Most external HDD are nothing more than an internal HDD in a case with a SATA-to-USB adapter. So no need to turn off your computer, you can use your disk like any regular external HDD. To remove it safely you can use your file manager's eject option or the umount command-line tool.


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Hi it may be obvious but have you cleaned out your old images? The old superseded ones do stick around and they do take up space. Fire up synaptic and search for "linux-image" and click on installed. If you have a loooooong list of images with ascending numbers you need to delete all but the ones with numbers lower than the last two with the highest number. ...


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You root partition is full (Mounted on /). Since /tmp is a directory on / you have (at least) two options: a) Increase size of /. You may do this for example with the GParted live disk: http://gparted.org/livecd.php b) Mount another partition on /tmp. For this you need to add an entry to your /etc/fstab file like this: /dev/sdb1 /tmp ext4 ...


1

Linux can be install on any driver or any partition. This also includes usb Pen drives as well as other usb or extended drives that are recognized at boot. The Linux install comes with a GUI that will walk you through the steps. When you boot the install disk it will give you default options, this includes installing along side Windows. Choosing that ...


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Yes. You can shrink that 263 GB volume by following this guide. Next you can increase the space of your /home and swap using this guide.


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Found a little better solution than truncate -s 0 (at least I believe so) and I'm putting it here for whoever might need it (or maybe someone will give some hints how to improve it?). Since dir, ls and cat works with cache and disabling cache is not a good idea, I figured you can make lots of empty folders and ls'em one after another. Here's a script to ...


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You have your Windows 8.1 installed in Legacy Mode and Legacy Mode does not support more than 4 primary partitions. More on UEFI vs Legacy You already have 4 primary partitions created (namely C, E, F & system reserved). Ubuntu installer can't create a fifth primary partition to install Ubuntu on. You can do any one of the following. 1 : Delete one ...


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I just did the same setup on my computer. Apparently I am able to run Windows 10 with just 50 GB and some software installed, of course you need to make sure to always keep it kinda clean. The Ubuntu partition itself needs about 30 with software on mine. So it should work. The question about the access depends on the kind of disk-formating you intend to use ...


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As you can see the drive still in Gparted, you can go on and create a new partition table for it by starting gParted and then choose the proper device, go to the menu bar and click on Devices --> create partition table as format you can choose msdos afterwards build your partitions like you want and apply it. Hope this will work for you.


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looks like your drive controller doesn't support that method of enquiry, not all usb sata chipsets are created equal. You don't say what model of drive or controller you are using so its hard to offer more advice here. You could test this by plugging into another usb controller or using a different drive with the same controller or better still direct via ...


0

Finally found the answer from somebody else on another site, just zeroed the inodes and rechecked the system, that was all! debugfs -w /dev/sda2 :clri <1415> :clri <1416> :clri <1417> :q fsck -y /dev/sda2 To anybody else with this issue, I found my bad inodes using find on the bad mount, then checked dmesg for errors on the bad inodes.


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First, is your Ubuntu in EFI mode ? You can check with this [ -d /sys/firmware/efi ] && echo EFI || echo BIOS I do not think it can detect EFI boots if it is in BIOS mode.


0

I went to a professional agency, which gave me the following diagnostic: "It appear that the firmware defective (on the electronic card and plate of the disk. Furthermore, it seems that the data are crypted via an interface SATA/USB." or in french " Seagate Z1E7SPVR. Problème détecté : firmware défectueux (sur la carte électronique et plateaux du ...


1

While you ask about dd, may I recommend partclone? It is made to clone and restore a partition. It needs to be aware of the underlying filesystem, advantage over dd is that it copies only the used blocks and saves a lot of time or space, since it is rare that the unused part of a partition is compressible (old data garbage instead of zeroes). sudo ...


1

Easier way: sudo fdisk -l as said by Videonath. Locate the partition you wish to clone dd bs=512 if=/dev/<partition-name> of=/<external-media-path> e.g.dd bs=512 if=/dev/sda2 of=/dev/sdb1 Note: dd requires the size of the target to be grater or equal to the size of the source The backup created this way (partition level) would not be ...


1

As first you need to find out data about your HDD, you can do this by typing in terminal: sudo fdisk -l You should get an output like this: Disk /dev/sda: 149,1 GiB, 160041885696 bytes, 312581808 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disklabel ...


7

It sounds like for your purposes it's enough to simply format the drive, not overwrite it. Overwriting would be necessary if you wanted to make sure no previously saved data would be recoverable in the future. But it sounds like you don't need that. Rather, you need to format it, and perform a clean install of Ubuntu. Yes, this is totally possible. Boot ...


0

What I had to do is install the amd64 version of Ubuntu 12.04, and then go through the upgrade to 14.04, and then 16.04. Pain in the posterior extremus, but it worked, and much more satisfactory than what I had to do before, which was run 32-bit Ubuntu (on a Mac Pro with dual quad-core 64-bit processors.)


1

If you want to mount the second hard drive automatically you will have to change things at this point :D. There should be no reason to have it symbolically linked anywhere for a second hard drive. If it is mounted at /media/username/a bunch of numbers and you have that linked to a folder off the root called /SecondDrive ... you don't need to do that you ...


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Use the standby timer setting ( -S ). It does not know or care about batteries.


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OK, It's eventually resolved. I resized my sda so now it only has one partition which is sda1. (before that I copied files on boot partition to /boot)The swap is the old swap area on hdd. Then I used boot-repair tool again.This time it solved the problem. Be sure to open a terminal before the operation because it may probably cannot run during the repair. ...


0

Can you clarify if you still have both hard drive and SSD installed in the machine? Did you change the boot priority in your BIOS? If the Hdd is still higher in the boot order than the SSD, then it will boot from that first and not even look at the SSD.


2

It's a standard SATA drive. There should be no reason you can't. Hard drives don't come encrypted out of the box.


1

I experienced the same problem (on a Dell XPS 13). The issue for me was that the SATA bios setting was set to raid (which Ubuntu doesn't seem to recognize?). The following link (second post/ first answer) explains how to change it to ahci: http://www.eightforums.com/drivers-hardware/53429-migrating-raid-ssd-switching-ahci.html (edit: You can ignore the ...


0

Write speed $ dd if=/dev/zero of=./largefile bs=1M count=1024 1024+0 records in 1024+0 records out 1073741824 bytes (1.1 GB) copied, 4.82364 s, 223 MB/s Block size is actually quite large. You can try with smaller sizes like 64k or even 4k. Read speed Run the following command to clear the memory cache $ sudo sh -c "sync && echo 3 > ...



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