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You should proceed to delete your 50GB NTFS formatted drive (from the Ubuntu installation wizard) this will mark it as free space. After that you'll need to create a partition for your Ubuntu installation and a partition for the swap in this free space. Note: Ubuntu cannot be installed on NTFS, you can use ext4 instead.


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Yes, there is: Open System Settings > "Security & Privacy" > "Files & Applications" (tab). Add the directory (or the complete drive) to the list to exclude from search. In most cases, you will need to clear the history (completely) and possibly log out / in to take effect. From then on the files will not appear in search, nor in recently used ...


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While both external and internal hard drives are susceptible to encountering problems through power surges or outages, external hard drives are at greater risk of damage due to receiving power through its own, independent power cable. The power cable itself can become damaged which causes a power outage to the external hard drive causing it to fail. ...


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(I) For dual-boot systems with ONLY ONE hard-drive and assuming you prefer MBR (as GPT are a REALLY BAD way to handle your partitioning): a) Three PRIMARY Partitions: - sda1 -> C:\ NTFS [minimum size 50 GB, max size 100 GB] - sda3 -> /boot ext2 [300 MB] - sda4 -> / ext4 [minimum size 20 GB, max size 40 ...


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try to to split the capacity of the drive to small partitions like 1TB each, or 500gb, i think it will not have issues, although it is a bit strange to see this happen


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I had the same issue after duplicating an HFS+ partition so I though I might share my solution. I solved it by running a Disk repair from Mac Os Disk Utility application. You can run it from a Macos install or the Recovery DVD.


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In theory you could use the raw device, but that's just a side note. You first need to create a new partition table on the device using sfdisk, fdisk or cfdisk.


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Not sure about this but if you wrote something on the whole disk, at least one partition should be corrupted. Try to see if GParted can help you (sudo apt-get install gparted).


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What you need is RAID. More: you need RAID-1. There are various types, you can read up on the Internet about how to set up your hard drives in these combinations.


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There are lots of ways to copy over your data, even if your data folders are encrypted. All you have to do is boot the old drive and copy the data you want to copy onto external media and back to the new media. You could also try using the included "backup" utility which works very well in my experience. Having said all of that, had you asked me before you ...


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With bad sectors, you should always immediately backup all important information and get a new hard drive. You can theoretically mark these sectors as "bad" and tell the computer not to use them. However, this is not at all recommended as bad sectors like spreading like a fungus. If you want to try this, instructions are below. Find your hard drive with ...


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You have to mount the LVM partition. It can be confusing if the physical volumes and/or logical volumes have the same name ... Scan your system for LVM volumes and identify in the output the volume sudo vgscan you will see something like Found volume group "fedora" using metadata type lvm2 You should see two volume groups activate the (old) ...


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Was that disk part of a RAID volume??? Can you also provide the output of: sudo fdisk -l (sorry, but my "reputation" from stack exchange apparently doesn't transfer here in AskUbuntu, so I cannot add this as a comment)


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If You are using Linux for the first time, then I would strongly recommend to leave partitioning job for the installer. Ubuntu installer has ability to automatically partition the hard disk in an optimal scheme - just use this function and everything will be good.


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It's basically futile. It might help for a short while, but if your disk has bad sectors, then it's only going to get more bad sectors with time. It's best to buy a new disk, and/or get that one replaced if it is under warranty. If it's not under warranty, then back up the good data to a good disk, write 0s to the bad disk at least 10 times, and take it to a ...


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Although it was done on a different MacBook Pro model the answer provided here works for 14.04 on the MacBook Pro 13" Late 2011. Download the b43updated.zip file to a usb flash drive then drag and drop the file > to your ubuntu desktop. Right-click it and select Extract Here. Open a terminal and do: sudo mkdir /lib/firmware/b43 sudo cp ...


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I had faced this predicament once. I took the gamble and formatted my boot drive. Later on i realized that mdadm can assemble the RAID arrays even after a clean installation. What this means is, you dont need to re-configure the RAID once again. mdadm does it and the RAID device would be active for the system. Run sudo fdisk -l. This will list the RAID ...


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If you only need to read data from that volume, you can just run mount -t "ntfs" -o "ro,uhelper=udisks2,nodev,nosuid,uid=1000,gid=1000,dmask=0077,fmask=0177" "/dev/sda3" "/media/maan/E6B86A3CB86A0AFF"' or reboot to Windows, shutdown Windows, start Ubuntu again


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Its simple, plug in the drive. goto 'disks' select the correct disk in the left column. click the gear icon select 'edit mount options' turn 'off' check both 'mount at startup' and 'show user interface' Thats it!


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To mount a partition at startup for all users, we need an entry in the fstab file. What is happening presently is, the HDD is getting mounted for the user who logs in which gives access permissions to only that user. By adding an entry in the fstab, the partition will be mounted by root with access to all users. this r/w access can be controlled later on. ...


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You are trying to mount whole hard disk drive instead of partition on it. Try mounting /dev/sdc1 instead of /dev/sdc.


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Have you tried dislocker? Looks promising: http://www.hsc.fr/ressources/outils/dislocker/download/


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2 possible outcomes/scenarios from this. 1: When inside ubuntu try running sudo update-grub in the terminal. To find the terminal search terminal in the Dash, located in the top left corner. This will locate all existing OS's and add them to the Grub menu loader. 2: If that does not fix your issue, you most likely, accidentally, erased your Windows 8, and ...


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You can write the installer image to a hd and boot from it. If you edit the kernel command line options on the boot menu and add toram then it will load entirely into ram and leave the disk unmounted so you can reformat and install the system there. Aassuming /dev/sdb is the drive you want to use ( wipe out ): sudo dd if=ubuntu.iso of=/dev/sdb


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Starting with Windows 8, Windows doesn't unmount your filesystems before shutting down, because it doesn't really shutdown, but hibernate. They call this "fast boot". For a dual-boot system, you should deactivate this so that filesystems are unmounted when you shutdown Windows. When you do, this filesystem will be marked as "clean" and you'll have no ...


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The segmentation fault is unrelated to the problem with the hard drive. It indicates something went wrong with the software you were using at the time, possibly photorec itself. Options: Use a newer version of photorec as it may have fixed that problem Use testdisk, which is a tool from the same author as photorec and can do similar things, though it may ...


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Copy over files from 8 to 7. Then in gparted delete sda8, this will become unallocated space. Then resize sda8.


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To obtain the UUID of the drive, use the following command: blkid Use the UUID of the drive in fstab instead of /dev/sdX. The UUID is static and should remain the same even when the device name changes.


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I've got access with a little distinct sintax: sudo mount -t cifs -o username=administrador,password=XXXXXX //10.20.12.21/NASIII /home/rsouza/NAS Don't forget to enable NFS on the NAS (Network-Protocols)


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Try TestDisk from CGSecurity (info here). In the the link: TestDisk can: Fix partition table, recover deleted partition Recover FAT32 boot sector from its backup Rebuild FAT12/FAT16/FAT32 boot sector Fix FAT tables Rebuild NTFS boot sector Recover NTFS boot sector from its backup Fix MFT using MFT mirror Locate ext2/ext3/ext4 Backup SuperBlock Undelete files ...


-1

I think the reason for the 4TB volume only being recognized as less than 4 TB is because storage is sold on base 10 and measured in base 2 and formating takes some space. A base 2 terabyte is 1024 gigabytes, a gigabyte is 1024 megabytes and so fourth. Storage is sold in base 10 teragytes, 1TB=1000GB, 1GB=1000MB, and so fourth.so a 4TB drive is 4 X 10^12 and ...


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Packages are being installed rather in proper directories/paths, not on disks as such - better to leave Windows thinking style aside. What counts here is the directory tree - starting from / - aka root filesystem, and then, for example: /boot /bin /sbin /home /var /tmp /root etc. Those can be just directories or mountpoints - where other disks can be ...


0

First of all test your external HDD on your installed Ubuntu system. There is a chance that Ubuntu can still read it. If so, backup all your data from it (to have a copy at least), and go back to Mac and using the Disk Utility: You will have 2 options: If you succeded with making a copy: format your external HDD, and copy back all your data from the ...


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Yes, there is. You can download an Ubuntu iso from Ubuntu's official Website Then, you can make a live USB with UNetBootin which is a tool for creating bootable live USB drives. Here is a screenshot of UNetBootin:


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Yes. In fact, you have much greater flexibility with Wine. You'll normally want to have different Wine prefixes and these can be stored anywhere you like. So you could have WoW installed in a Wine prefix that was stored on a network share, for instance. A wine prefix is really not much more than a directory, but acts like a complete Windows install. The ...


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Try using rsync with the -v option. It will show you a progress bar, and if it happens to get stuck at some point, you'll know exactly at file it gets stuck. To use rsync: Insert your external hard drive. Navigate to the folder you want to copy and press Ctrl + L in the navigation bar to get the path of that folder. Now open up terminal and type rsync ...


0

Grub also uses UUID in searching for the partition to set as root. Since I wanted to do away with all uses of UUID in grub, I've modified /usr/share/grub/grub-mkconfig_lib such that when I run update-grub, it uses labels instead. see: Patch for making update-grub (/usr/share/grub/grub/grub-mkconfig_lib) use labels


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You may need to set user permissions by chowning the earth volume to your user name. This sounds complicated but is insanely easy & teaches you some CLI skills. (Not to be confused with chmod.)


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Correcting the line in /etc/fstab should help. If you have used the disk utility to setup the auto mount options, you should be seeing a line which contains the mount point (here /home/username/Earth ?) Check if the line exists. If not, use the disk utility to set it up again. Looks like the directory /home/username/Earth exists and it is not specified as ...


1

Your computer is not aware of the system it is running, so either the HDD is broken or... well, that's about it. Of course there may be different read-ahead strategies, caching, whatever. But none of them should let the HDD make more noise with Linux than with Windows.


0

I got my hard drive back but lost all my NTFS data. I had to convert it to basic volume in windows, after I did that I was shown no NTFS anymore, all that space was unallocated space. And it had the ext4 and swap there to view. I still don't know what I did wrong...?


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You will need this package: sudo apt-get install cifs-utils Create a mount-point: sudo mkdir /media/my_supercool_hdd Add this entry to your /etc/fstab : //192.168.178.100/my_shared_folder /media/my_supercool_hdd cifs auto 0 0 The entry above means: //<Server>/<Share> <Mountpoint> cifs <mounting-options> 0 0 You can use ...


0

Generally, to make dual-boot work out of the box, one needs to install windows first and then Ubuntu. Ubuntu's bootloader - GRUB2 then autodetects Windows and creates entry in the GRUB bootlist. If you did the other way round, that is installed Ubuntu and then Windows, then you would need to repair the GRUB to be able to boot into both OSs. Now coming on ...


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If it is just "data" you would like protected, you can try using software such as VeraCrypt to create a separate encrypted partition where you can put all your data into.


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Referring to the screenshot provided, actually you should slide the "Automatic Mount Options" switch to "OFF". The "Mount at startup" and "Show in user interface" will become accessible (ensure they remain ticked), then click the OK button. The said partition should then automatically mount itself on your next reboot. To easily identify the partition you can ...


1

You need to add your mount into fstab. Since you haven't provided any useful info about partitions this is how you do it in a general way. mount manually cat /etc/mtab | grep 'name of Perosnal Drive partition' Output from previous command should be one line, something like this /dev/sdb2 /media/yourname/partitionname ext4 rw,nosuid,nodev,uhelper=udisks2 0 ...


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You can use iotop. To install, open a terminal and execute the following command: sudo apt-get install iotop To use iotop, open a terminal and type the following command: sudo iotop iotop features real-time display of all disk activity and also displays the command responsible for the activity and the user behind the command just like Resource Monitor. ...


0

You can use dstat program. To install it, simply execute the command in a terminal sudo apt-get install dstat then using dstat command, you can get a real time CPU/Network/Disk-Activity monitoring view like this mas@mas-laptop:~ > dstat You did not select any stats, using -cdngy by default. ----total-cpu-usage---- -dsk/total- -net/total- ---paging-- ...


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I once had the same problem and also lost a hard drive a while back. To fix this, I set hdparm to prevent spindowns alltogether to prevent this problem. Here's how it can be done. Open a terminal and execute the following commands: echo "hdparm -B 254 /dev/sda" | sudo tee -a /etc/pm/power.d/90_hdparm Now, make the file executable: sudo chmod +x ...



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