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are you sure nothing was formatted? If windows shows you nothing, that means the HDD most probably was formatted in ext4. During installation unfortunately you didn't pay attention at the step of installation location. By default Ubuntu's first option is Erase disk and install Ubuntu


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Based on this, it looks as though your 250GB hard drive has failed: File descriptor 9 (/proc/12881/mounts) leaked on lvscan invocation. Parent PID 20834: bash File descriptor 63 (pipe:[82571]) leaked on lvscan invocation. Parent PID 20834: bash /dev/sdb: read failed after 0 of 4096 at 0: Input/output error /dev/sdb: read failed after 0 of 4096 ...


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There are a few options available: fdisk (older, doesn't support GPT). parted (the CLI brother of GParted). The various mkfs programs, if you already have partitions and wish to format. fdisk and parted are interactive, and have help commands, so you can always look for help within the program. Both are also scriptable. The mkfs commands are not ...


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First you how to actually partition your hard drive with the fdisk utility. Linux allows only 4 primary partitions. You can have a much larger number of logical partitions by sub-dividing one of the primary partitions. Only one of the primary partitions can be sub-divided. fdisk is started by typing as root fdisk device at the command prompt. Device ...


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i used fsarchiver in SystemrescueCD(www.sysresccd.org). Steps to backup and restore: Boot with SystemrescueCD type fsarchiver probe in terminal to see the devices to save the Ubuntu 14.04(partition) in /dev/sdb1 as a .fsa file, type the below command in terminal $fsarchiver savefs -j2 -o /media/masha/Data/backup/backup/Ubuntu1404.fsa /dev/sdb1 NOTE: ...


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sudo parted -l This will list drives, partition tables, partitions, and filesystems.


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Your disk probably contains partitions that do not mount automatically... By checking the content of dmesg | less ... you may look for what kind of action the addition of the drive actually triggers -> by this you will see if it is detected. lsblk lists all known disks and partitions with the related /dev/xxx visible - see if you can locate it in ...


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First, make sure your kernel has SCSI generic support enabled. In make xconfig, this shows up under SCSI support -> SCSI generic support.


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Try installing Ubuntu and moving home directory to your new system. If you need to move it and it's a proper installation (not live version) then use dd bs=4M if=/dev/partition_on_pendrive of=/dev/partition_on_disk Then chroot into partition you've created and install grub. Don't forget about swap.


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This could be caused by the fact that your harddisk has some bad blocks. I would recommend you to boot from the USB stick again and run the following command from a terminal: sudo fsck -c /dev/sdb6 This will add those bad blocks to the bad block list, meaning that they should not be used any more. Another option is to run gparted and trigger a check of ...


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It seems the boot order in your BIOS is "wrong", but it's not apparent because the boot loader skips unpartitioned media. My BIOS setup offers a separate configuration option for the boot order of individual hard drives, which is sometimes messed up, after I (dis-)connect (non-boot) drives.


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Not enough memory or swap space With only 2 GiB of main memory and without swap space you're likely to run into problems. I suggest you create and mount a swap partition for that. You can easily set up an encrypted swap partition with dm-crypt, which will break resuming from suspend-to-disk because of the random one-time volume keys. To delete "OS1" simply ...


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I guess you are using Ubuntu alongside Windows 8/8.1, windows uses hybrid boot that lets it start faster. If you want to mount you drives turn it off or just hold down the "Shift" key when pressing the "Shutdown" button from windows menu. Also you can mount drivers in "Read-only" state using. udisksctl mount --block-device /dev/sda7 --options ro


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You have to make sure that the user plex has access not only to the drive, but the folder that the drive is mounted in. After a lot of tinkering I found that doing: chmod 777 /media/<user>/ chmod -R 777 /media/<user>/MediaHDD/ solved my issue. As @douggro mentioned, Plex has a good article on the subject, but they changed up the structure of ...


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Your windows documents will be in the folder Users\Documents and Settings\(username). Your Ubuntu documents will be in the folder /home/(username). Back up the files you want to keep, and then format the entire drive as NTFS. Then copy your documents back in. BTW, the screenshot you posted is showing your Windows partition only. Your Ubuntu partition is ...


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If you need to make a partition auto mounted in Ubuntu. Run: sudo blkid You will see UUIDs of your partitions, the next is just an example: /dev/sda1: LABEL="Recovery" UUID="B23613F43613B875" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda2: LABEL="Windows" UUID="38CE9483CE943AD8" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda3: LABEL="Data" UUID="519CB82E5888AD0F" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda5: ...


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When you start up the computer using the Ubuntu USB, click the Try Ubuntu button to get to a desktop. As long as your hard drive is functioning property, and as long as your Windows 7 installation is not encrypted, these steps should work to access your documents: Click on the folder icon on the left-hand side to open the file browser. Under the "Devices" ...


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If your motherboard offers this, there is generally a Hard Drive setting in the BIOs that will allow you to change the setup from IDE to RAID. Once you have made that change, you should be able to configure RAID but you would need to make sure that your motherboard supports SATA RAID or something similar, depending on your setup.


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Just install the drive to your PC and start Ubuntu. It will recognize the drive automaticly and you can find it in the unity dock at the bottom or in the file browser on the left. You may need to format you drive


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I'm not sure what problem you have but you can normally access your partitions on both; your SSD and your HDD without doing anything. Just go to "files" and you should find the partitions listed on the left.


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To format your drive open a terminal and run this sudo apt-get install gparted Once installed run it from the dash. Now find the drive whitch you want to format from the top right drop down. Then right click and unmount it, now right click and format to, then use NTFS if you need windows compatability, or ext-4 if you do not,as a file system and click ...


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I've used RedoBackup, and it does just that. I have tested it with 14.04, and it works OK. Using it, will restore everything back to the exact same condition prior to doing the image. And the beauty about it that you don't have to install it, you can either use a Live CD or USB.


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I was trying to create an encrypted partition in that unallocated space following these instructions at the Wiki, this being the reason why I was using the Disk Utility. But the it was returning the error above, even when instructed to create a non-ecrypted partition (ext4). Even though GParted seems to lack this functionality it succeeded in creating a ...


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I found this issue as H/W issue, You can refer to this artical, it may be helpful : Fix : External USB Hard Disk drive not detecting / not working properly problem in Windows 8 , 7 , Vista & XPThis article has very good description resolving this issue. I am also facing such problem with my Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex and Slimbook both using it with Lappy, ...


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Boot from LiveCD, mount your root partition like this mount /dev/sda2 /mnt then do nano /mnt/etc/fstab to add noauto option to this NTFS partition. It should be like ... ntfs defaults,noauto 0 0. Ctrl+X to save, then reboot.


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As always, you should back up your data before doing any of this !! You can change the type with fdisk sudo fdisk /dev/sdc Display the partition list ; p The partition(s) on the disc will be listed, along with some information. Look for what is listed under the "System" column (it should say it is a raid member). Change the type by pressing ; t ...


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You go do this all through terminal, but I personally find it easiest to run my file manager (I use nemo but nautilus is default) as root and to change permissions graphically. So open up a terminal and run gksudo nautilus. Open the properties like you did in the screenshot. Since you're root now, you will be able to change it to your user. This, however, ...


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On your external harddrive, the master file table (MFT) and its copy (MFTMirr) are seemingly no longer consistent. You might want to fix it using the Linux tool ntfsfix on the command line. Hook the drive to your Linux machine. Open a terminal by holding the ALT and the CTRL down while pressing the t key. In the terminal, enter which ntfsfix and press ...


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There is an earlier thread which addresses this issue:- How can I recover my data after replacing Windows with Ubuntu? First bit of advice in there is "Stop using the drive!" Best of luck...


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You can use ledcontrol for that precise purpose. You might be interested by this thread as well.


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Slightly different suggestion. Not necessarily better. Each user has to decide how he will use system. I prefer to have / (root) on SSD but not a separate /boot or any other system partitions. And I leave /home inside root so the user settings are also on the faster drive. But then create data partition(s) on rotating drive for all data and link data back ...


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For quick booting, you would want it to boot from the SSD. Usually /boot is 300 to 500MB, put this on the SSD at the beginning. I normally suggest / (root) of 20 or 25GB also on the SSD (After the /boot). Now you can add /home or data partition(s) onto the 2TB drive. Hope this helps


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You're probably out of luck; that bug is horrid. However, give gpart a go. Good luck!


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For those who are still looking for an answer: If your HDD is "bricked" and cannot be mounted properly, there are some things to do: make an image, if you have the space. Operating on an image file won't damage the data on your harddisk, in case you make mistakes and destroy your data. if you still can mount your partitions, mount it read-only. Alter the ...


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Well first of all a little more information on your setup would be nice so I could fill your partition names etc. As you said you marked it as failed and removed it (I guess with mdadm --manage /dev/md0 --remove /dev/sdb1 or whatever your raid/physical partitions are for every partition). Did you do this in a live system? Meaning is this a machine you can ...


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From what I understand, the Grive application uses ~/Google Drive (i.e., something like /home/suz/Drive) as the sync folder. You can mount the external disk at ~/Drive (or some folder within that folder). You will need to edit /etc/fstab for that, and make sure the external disk is connected whenever grive starts up. You can mount your external drive to ...


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You've formatted the second drive as Dynamic - the NTFS-3G module in Ubuntu will not read these correctly. Reformat the drive as basic and it should pick up. Note that you will lose all data on the drive doing it. You can convert from basic to dynamic without data loss, but not the other way around. Also, you'll save yourself a lot of trouble by formatting ...


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My experience of MyBook devices is that they use a type of RAID to provide advanced features. This can be mounted in Ubuntu, if you know how. First of all is the easy way. It might work. It might not. In a terminal, run: sudo apt-get install mdadm It'll probably ask you to configure postfix, just accept the defaults. Reboot and you might find that you ...


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Hard disks are special in these ways: They do not like to collide with hard and heavy things. They really do noy like hitting anything at all while they are running. Otherwise, they are just devices you should better not pour coffee on, and better not touch if you have electrostatic charge on you. So: the hard disk does not care how you scratch the ...


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Scratches on the outside case of a hard drive won't hurt it. The "outlet" is a set of jumper pins used to change the electronic state of the drive circuitry. You usually don't need to mess with them for a typical computer configuration. You can check the documentation for the drive at the manufacturer's website if you want to know what the function of ...


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There will probably be no damage to it. But it's impossible to tell just from that picture. In general, you're more likely to damage a drive from impact (shaking the stuff inside) then from scratches to the outside.


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The sectors of your hard disk got corrupted. DRDY ERR - Device Ready Check Error. UNC - Uncorrectable. Due to various reasons such as abrupt shut down during extensive write, High temperature, Read write operations carried out and the quality of hard disk plays a major role in this case. Once a sector got corrupted and if the kernel tries to access those ...


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If this is not a "disk" inside a virtualbox, but the real physical disk where the vm images are stored on, that looks pretty bad. There were read errors, on /dev/sda. There is an automatic handling by marking a disk block as bad block forever, and use a different one instead. For this to work, the harddisk needs to read the data one single more time, maybe ...


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From what I've read, either HDDerase or Parted Magic can achieve this. If you create a Live USB with Parted Magic you should be able to do this quite easily. Perhaps one of the following guides will help: http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-securely-erase-an-ssd-drive/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udxNL6sCuDQ ...


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Try using Wine to open lockdir.exe. See How can I install Windows software or games?


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I have fixed the problem by opening the NVIDIA X Server Settings application and changing the graphics profile from NVIDIA to Intel, but thanks for the other answers.


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You could easily do that by removing the existing hard drive from the working computer. Hook the spare drive up to the good computer as the only drive during the installation. That way you wouldn't have to worry about overwriting the existing bootloader as it wouldn't even be attached to the computer during installation. When the installation is done, swap ...


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This maybe should be a comment rather than an answer, but I don't have enough rep to comment. Have you considered a netboot install? https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/Netboot Read the docs naturally, but I'm pretty sure this wouldn't overwrite GRUB during the install.


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Try adding hfsutils, hfsutils-tcltk, libhfsp-dev, and maybe tmfs will bring in some dependency that will help with your situation: sudo apt-get install hfsutils hfsutils-tcltk libhfsp-dev tmfs


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plug the hard drive in a usb port. then click on open to view files. a window will open and you will see the word launcher click on the icon and that will take you to the unlock screen where you will type in your password. then click on unlock at the lower corner of the screen



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