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This might work, stop when you've fixed the issue: 1. Install gparted by sudo apt-get install gparted or other means. 2. Open gparted by sudo gparted. 3. Navigate to the dead partition. Does gparted call it anything? Is it still unknown? 4. Right-click the partition and hit "check". (you could also do sudo fsck /dev/sda1 if it fails) 5. Attempt manual ...


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Since this is an internal HDD, we can add an entry to /etc/fstab to make Ubuntu mount it on boot every time. First, pick a directory you want to mount it on (like /home/marius/internal, where marius is your username. Make sure the directory exists (make a new one if you need to). Then, do: cat <<EOF | sudo tee -a /etc/fstab /dev/sdb1 ...


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iOn my laptop with limited disk capability, two things help. First is changing the disk scheduled from deadline (the default) to cfq. At the command line this can be done by sudo -i echo cfq > /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler exit This should take effect immediately, and goes away on reboot. If you have more than one disk.... To make it permanent ...


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Linux will check for partitions on all hard drives on boot, and thus will read the partition table of all connected hard drives. This alone would cause your spin-up, but there may be additional causes. For an in-depth analysis, AFAIK the backend tools for ureadahead build a list of device blocks read during boot. You could use its logs to determine which ...


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Your grub seems has been installed on the external drive, so you need to repair it. Yes you can use the external hard drive on other machines. To repair grub: When you install Windows, Windows assumes it's the only OS on the machine--or at least it doesn't account for Linux. So, it replaces grub with its own boot loader. What you have to do is replace the ...


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Here is an approach how to make Winodws partitions auto mounted in Ubuntu. Run: sudo blkid You will see UUIDs of your partitions, the next is just an example: /dev/sda1: LABEL="Recovery" UUID="B23613F43613B875" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda2: LABEL="Windows" UUID="38CE9483CE943AD8" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda3: LABEL="Data" UUID="519CB82E5888AD0F" TYPE="ntfs" ...


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Seems you didn't try Unetbootin UNetbootin allows you to create bootable Live USB drives for Ubuntu, Fedora, and other Linux distributions without burning a CD. It runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. You can either let UNetbootin download one of the many distributions supported out-of-the-box for you, or supply your own Linux .iso file if you've already ...


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Try making a bootable hard disk using pendrive linux. There is also other software that can do similar things. If your hard disk doesn't show up, try formatting to FAT32. Also, make sure that there is nothing else on the disk. Use this page for more help. If you do need to re-format, be careful. This can wipe everything on the disk. Good luck!


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You used the word folder, which makes you might be talking about an encrypted /home folder. If that's the case, here's a really good answer. How do I move my encrypted /home to a new computer? If you're talking about moving an entire LVM, maybe this discussion will help. How to migrate an encrypted LVM install to a new disk Good luck.


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The procedure is that you first unmount any disks that may still be mounted: sudo umount /mnt/... (that is not a typo, the command is umount) Then the directory /mnt/... is empty and can be removed: sudo rmdir /mnt/... Then you can make a new mount point elsewhere: sudo mkdir /mnt/newmountpoint and mount the disk there: sudo mount -t auto ...


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Install indicator-sysmonitor from Is an Internet connectivity indicator applet available for the Unity panel?. You'll need to create a script that will contain a call to df or something similar and then parse out the required information. Get the script going in the terminal first to ensure you have the correct value before adding it to the indicator.


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For your new HDD, first create partitions using gparted as per your wish. Then, access your HDD using sudo fdisk device_name. m command in fdisk will print help menu. npcompete@npcompete-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk /dev/sda The device presents a logical sector size that is smaller than the physical sector size. Aligning to a physical sector (or optimal I/O) ...


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First check the raid(s): d@monster:~/Apps $>sudo dmraid -r /dev/sdd: isw, "isw_fhabhedd", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 /dev/sdc: isw, "isw_fhabhedd", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 /dev/sdb: isw, "isw_dhejejifba", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 /dev/sda: isw, "isw_dhejejifba", GROUP, ok, 3907029166 sectors, data@ 0 Then, mount ...


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Step 1: Backup Backup your data in your Windows and second hard drive to an external source, such as an external hard drive, USB drive, or DVD. This is very important. We will do things that cannot be changed back. If you make a mistake, your data will be gone forever. Step 2: Test and verify Test that your computer can run Ubuntu without any problems, ...


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This may have nothing to do with this but, is your laptop plugged in? In an effort to save battery power your system is probably spinning down the disk when not in use for some period of time. When on AC it may be keeping it spun up for maximum performance -- generating higher temp. Also, MAKE SURE that your fan isn't clogged,or the laptop is in a tight ...


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If your Ubuntu is a virtual machine it is installed on a virtual hard drive you created when creating the virtual machine not on either of your hard drives (which would not be named C or D under Ubuntu. If you want to give Ubuntu the full 260 GB of space you have to install it natively and JBOD. Else your Windows host system will always take up some ...


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Yes it should work. When you boot into the live usb, open disks (press windows key and type in 'disks'), select the hard drive you are talking about and click mount. Then you will be able to access the files with the file manager (called 'files'). The external hard drive should automount so you shouldn't have any trouble with that.


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I/O error very often means a hardware failure. If it's not hardware then more than likely you will need to reformat or/and repartition the drive. So probably try gparted and fdisk. Also you can try to boot up from Live CD to narrow the problem down.


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Here's the solution: laptop-mode-tools is controlling power management for your hard drive, and you need to configure it appropriately for your situation. Open /etc/laptop-mode/laptop-mode.conf for editing with root privileges, and around line 276 (on Ubuntu 12.04), change this value to 600 NOLM_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS=7200 This is the amount of time ...


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Boot to the live USB/CD media, then install and run gparted. sudo apt-get install gparted && sudo gparted This will allow you to resize partitions safely.


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If when trying to install Ubuntu, the driver selection window appears as blank (and maybe the installer crash), try deleting RAID files from your disk. Get to the Live ubuntu and open a terminal (ctrl+alt+T, or click on the dash icon). Type: sudo dmraid -E -r /dev/sda Try the installation steps again


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You can try to add the module to the blacklist: sudo gedit /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf add: blacklist usb-storage or echo "blacklist usb-storage" | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf Enabling it later should just be: sudo modprobe usb-storage


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If I were you I would not set the swap to over 32gb, or else it gets even slower. There really is no way that I know of to just use them all as one disk, but if you set one as /, another as /home and possibly the other three just for data and have swap on one of the data ones then you will be golden for years to come. Or you could just look up how to set ...


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Unfortunately the b120i does not have stables drivers under Ubuntu/Debian yet - this issue is discussed at https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu-certification/+question/214703. There is a PPA by HP (note these are not fully tested nor certified): https://launchpad.net/~hp-iss-team/+archive/ubuntu/hp-storage?field.series_filter=trusty If you need something ...


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You cannot rely on sdX to remain the same (it probably will, but no guarantees). You should use either labels or UUIDs. See the devices in /dev/disks/by-label and /dev/disk/by-UUID. You can check which drives have been used as currently by using the mount command (which will use sdX in the output). To fix your cryptswap, edit the file /etc/crypttab to use ...


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Run these two commands: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.media-handling automount 'false' gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.media-handling automount-open 'false' Or you can try it with a udev rule: sudo nano /etc/udev/rules.d/85-no-automount.rule Paste this line SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ENV{UDISKS_AUTO}="0" and save the file. Reboot the system.


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The solution to the problem of insufficient space on the hard disk caused by unhelpful partition sizes proved to be to upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04.4 (Trusty Tahr) which gave me a nice, large and contiguous partition. The method I used was to create a bootable USB stick, download the installation file from http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop and install. The ...


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You can do this graphically in Synaptic. if it is not installed, Install it with the command: sudo apt install synaptic then: First ensure that you enabled the Installed Size and Download size columns (or only one if you want that one). To do this, go to Settings>Preferences and choose Columns and Fonts, then tick the columns you want to see. !Then ...


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Here is an answer which doesn't show directly asked packages info, it is covered in other answers in this thread, but though you will probably find helpful to have a list of what takes a lot of space on your file system. sudo du / -h|sort -n -r|less will show you the biggest files of your / at the top of the screen. It is generally related to looking for ...


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I am a big fan of baobab to figure out where the big files are hidden. To install: sudo apt-get install baobab


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For a particular package: apt-cache show <packagename> | grep -E '^(.*Size|Version|Package)' Add or remove fields in the grep string as necessary. Since multiple versions may be present, I added the Version and Package fields as well. Note that the Installed Size field is an estimated value, in KB, whereas the Size field is for the package file and ...


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My lack of understanding of Ubuntu made me figure I could just re-install the OS which was on the SSD. So, I overwrote the entire installation. I believe I've reinstalled ZFS correctly on Ubuntu. That part is fine. I then attempted to recreate the pool using what I could remember from the settings. You need to be more explicit about this step in ...


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I guess you have two separate problems: the formatting and the HDD type. First, if you selected the option to format the HDD...the entire HDD, then you are stuck. All of your data is gone and trying to get it to a drive type that is compatible with Windows won't get it back. Second, Windows and Ubuntu uses a different drive type. Windows uses NTFS and ...


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If you overwrote your original Windows partitions with with Linux partitions and installed the whole operating system on it, it might not be possible to get back a lot of data. If you really require the old data, the first thing you need to do is stop using the hard-disk to boot Linux from it. Connecting the hard-disk to a second PC is a good idea. Tools ...


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Can you run df -h to confirm that you are actually running out of space? As for deleting files with the LiveCD, try using sudo to remove the directory as root. Run sudo nautilus to use Nautilus or sudo rm on the command line.


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I was interested in finding this out myself. I created a quick and dirty script for measuring spindown. It works on intervals of SECONDS from uptime, and you can specify which disk(s) and intervals to use. It logs results to ~/sleepdata.log It only uses hdparm and uptime. It probably has bugs too. DL @ ...


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I know this thread is old but I recently encountered the same problem on a newly bought machine with 6 sata slots. I installed the cdrom and the hardrive on 2 sata slots close to each other and then proceeded to install ubuntu without errors until I reboot then on I saw the ata8: hard resetting link error. The machine halts up to this point never recovered. ...


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For example you have two devices /dev/sda - will be ssd /dev/sdb - will be hdd in sda you create new partition ext4 with mount point /, and for sdb - you create ext4 with mount point /home And in the future you put all your files in home/user directory


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Run Disks (14.04) or disk Utility (12.04) On your system you will see something very similar to this: Here you will see all your drives. Select one and you'll see details regarding how they are partitioned and where they are mounted (if they are). You can see above that the first partition of my SSD is mounted at / (yours looks to be the same). You can ...


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You are doing well, the disk/partition with Ubuntu itself normally is not shown in the Nautilus as, for example, the Windows partitions are shown. Instead you can see it in gparted as at your picture, or, for example, in: mount -l which makes me thing you will find there this string: /dev/sdb1 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro)


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Did you try the firmware update v5865? http://support.wd.com/product/download.asp?groupid=2301&sid=222&lang=en


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I believe you can run your distro as live from hard disk itself. You can create manual entry in grub2 as per the instruction in given link run-linux-live-images-from-hard-disk-in-linux. But still i am searching for a way to make it persistent. I hope that helps.


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Most Linux distributions by default will make a swap partition that is equal to your computers memory. This is so you can keep your RAMs contents saved to disk if you ever hibernate. It is also used as extra room in case your ram becomes full. If you max out your ram without swap your systems kernel will kill off what it considers non-critical processes. If ...


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Its due to ATI Catalyst proprietary driver. In 14.04, I am using only open source drivers and its working perfectly fine! Thanks


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Boot a live usb, make sure all your partitions are unmounted, and run: sudo fsck -y /dev/sda change "sda" to your hard drive. This command will try to fix the problem(s). if it does not work, update your question with any error messages


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Open a root session of nautilus or your file manager, go to the drive after using gparted to wipe it, right click in the root of the drive and go over to the permissions tab. Go to advances or your manager's equivalent and set the group to "users" and owner to your user name, make permissions for the owner and group (if you like) full access with permissions ...


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Though the above will work, I'd do this as I am lazy (slash then rebuild). Use Gparted to view the drive through the GUI. find and clean/delete the drive partitions, add a new primary partition. this will effectively reset the permissions on the drive partitions as they will be destroyed too. sudo apt-get install gparted also when on the root of the ...


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Step 1) Connect the drive. Wipe the drive if desired. a) If you have data on the drive that you need to keep, back it up. b) Fill the drive with zeros which will blow away the MBR and all data by: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX **or** if you want a progress report as you wipe the drive use sudo dc3dd wipe=/dev/sdX in both cases sdX should be ...


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besides the mentioned, since you said xubuntu, I'm assuming you run a desktop operating system. Uubuntu (plain) by itself for desktop tasks doesn't grow that much, and usually 10GB for / is enough for day to day usage. However, your /home/ folder might start getting bigger in time, if you go online, save data, modify data, run programs, etc.. If you are ...


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You should install Ubuntu on a separate partition so that you won't lose any data. The most important thing is you should create a separate partition for Ubuntu manually, and you should select it while installing Ubuntu. First create a separate partition for Ubuntu while running Windows (like a partition with more than 10 GB). Also create a small ...



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