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I have recovered the 175GB of space by using BleachBit (as root). Tick all the boxes.


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First you have to create a new partition on sdb with fdisk. You have to format this partition with ext4 (or any other filesystem type you want). To move all the data I recommend you to boot from a LiveCD/LiveUSB. Mount sda2 in /mnt/sda2 and sdb1 in /mnt/sdb1. Then copy all the data from /mnt/sda2/home to /mnt/sda2. Finally you have to edit the ...


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Create an ESP (EFI partition, see this page ), then run Boot-Repair again.


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If you want to work with the installed tools, you could use du -sh /* which shows you the accumulated usage for each folder (and file) in / You can then do this for subfolders until you found what you are looking for. Of course, the tools mentioned in other answers are much nicer, but sometimes you can't easily install them.


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Use the ducks: du -cks *|sort -rn|head -n11 This will list the top ten subdirectories and files in the current path and the space they are using, and a total. If you change the -cks to -cms it reports in MB's instead of KB's, which is probably more useful these days. You can add x to the options on du to prevent it going into other file systems, if ...


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My secondary hard drive I keep all my data, and I booted into windows, changed one file, shut down, booted back into Ubuntu, and now I can't access anything on the hard drive. I assume that means you have atleast 3 partitions or drives and you don't want to access the Windows drive itself (see Unable to mount Windows (NTFS) filesystem due to ...


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This may happen if you hibernate the windows system. Try accessing the hard drive again from windows and see if that is possible. If yes do a complete reboot and then try to access the drive from ubuntu. If that also does not do it, try accessing the disk with superuser access (be a bit careful here though)


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A standard filesystem scan is usually done with fschk. This application handles most filesystems out of the box. However, you may need to install NTFS support separately on some installations. If you'd like to do a surface scan of your drive you can use e2fsck. Use the -c option to do a bad sector scan. It should also be mentioned that nearly every Linux ...


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ncdu If you use the command line, you could use ncdu. It uses a command-line GUI (ncurses). Installation sudo apt-get install ncdu Description From its webpage: [...] ncdu: A disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface, aimed to be run on a remote server where you don't have an entire gaphical setup, but have to do with a simple SSH ...


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Another very useful app for this is: JDiskReport Is very similar to windows SpaceSniffer and has very useful IU. You need java to use it An image to see how it works: Hope it helps !


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One nice Gnome application is baobab sudo apt-get install baobab apt-cache show baobab Description-en: GNOME disk usage analyzer Disk Usage Analyzer is a graphical, menu-driven application to analyse disk usage in a GNOME environment. It can easily scan either the whole filesystem tree, or a specific user-requested directory branch (local or remote). ...


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I actually just ran the live cd and installed ubuntu on my new harddrive with all my other hard drives plugged in. I used the advanced options to partition my empty hard drive and installed Ubuntu on it. It did the rest and grub allows me to boot into all os's I have installed.


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I did figure out what the problem was in the end and I posted some updates on the Windows 8 forums in this thread here: http://www.eightforums.com/general-support/39343-windows-8-automatic-repair-loop-issue.html This was the solution that I gave in that thread: Ok, so I've marked the problem as 'solved', because I've figured out what was going on. ...


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I suspect the drives, or still more likely, the SATA control chips on the motherboard are periodically overheating and protecting themselves by timing out rather than risking damage. Ordinarily winter is not the season when I encounter overheating issues, but in this case it seems possible. If you have an accessory fan you can direct at the motherboard, ...


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To know the HDD Model, Serial number and much more # sudo hdparm -i /dev/sda # sudo hdparm -I /dev/sda May be you have old IDE drive check with # sudo hdparm -i /dev/hda # sudo hdparm -I /dev/hda This will show you every information about your disk and storage # lshw -class disk -class storage If you have a SATA disk this command will give your ...


1

Once a hard drive starts to fail , you will start to have problems. You can continue to use the drive for some time, by re-formatting it, etc as you suggest. The drive may have some life in it, for example, I used a drive like this for over a year. Just make sure you have reliable back ups. Sometimes (rarely) they fail gradually, but eventually the drive ...


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Your statement "1TB is the Master Boot Record" is not exactly the right way of looking at things. The dialog is indicating the partitioning method, not the location of the boot sector for your installation. There is an unfortunate ambiguity between these two meaning of master boot record (MBR). However, if this was in fact where your boot sector resides ...


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You are on the right track; so far so good! Open up a terminal & become root: sudo -i Next, find the UUID for your drive: blkid /dev/sdb1, copy the result (with your mouse!). I am assuming here that you have only these 2 drives, no USB etc - it may not be sdb otherwise. You should get something like UUID="fgbdjdilyh354dfh" Then edit /etc/fstab & ...


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First things first, back up any important data. You will be modifying partitions, which can cause loss of data if done incorrectly. If you don't need anything off of Windows first, just delete the Windows partition and resize your Ubuntu partition to fill the available space. Boot from your Ubuntu live CD At the terminal, run: $ gksudo gparted& ...


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For each bad block number, first use dd to verify that it is bad ( and you didn't make some mistake somewhere ): sudo dd if=/dev/sda1 skip=##### count=1 of=/dev/null iflag=direct bs=1024 If that comes back with an error, then you are looking in the right spot.. now it's time to correct it: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda1 seek=###### count=1 ...


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As a good alternative to badblocks you can try diskscan ( from terminal:apt-get install diskscan). It measures the latency time of reading sectors and it also reports bad sectors. The longer the latency time the greater the probabilify of an error developing.


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Does the drive work normally on other computers or windows? Can you read & write to the entire drive? I've used external usb drive "cases" before, where you plug in a HD or cd/dvd drive, Ubuntu (Linux Mint) usually sees the HD's as /dev/sdc (for example) like a regular drive. No need for usbmount or pmount, but maybe yours is newer or weird somehow. Are ...


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The uid= and gid= options do not apply to ext4 file systems. All you need to do is mount the file system as you did (sudo mount -o rw /dev/sdb1 1TB/). Then sudo chown myusername:mygroupname 1TB Then you will own the file system you created and will be able to create files there as yourself.


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First, when it's auto-mounted, run mount and look for the /dev/sdb1 and see how it's mounted now. If there's a ro it's read-only, or a rw means you're almost done :) And a lsblk is a prettier way to see if & where drives are mounted too. sudo blkid may show some more useful info as well, possibly about FS types. It may be mounted rw now, but the ...


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Does sound like a bad drive, especially if you can literally hear it making funny noises (hear any?). Input/Output errors are generally fatal errors. You might be able to still read from some of the drive, but it probably won't get any better and will probably get worse. An encrypted drive would still be readable (assuming it's not some odd expensive ...


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Your hard-disk itself has a problem on one of its sectors and the hard-disk problem needs to be fixed before you try to re-use it. All that you've done until now is running file system repair tools which all assume they have a good hard drive to work with If you really suspect hard drive failure, (which is what this looks like) you should run badblocks In ...


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First, I would unmount it. umount /dev/sdb1 Then, I'd remount it sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /home/user/driveb1 rw 0 2 I would then check to be sure it was remounted mount


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I'm a little confused about which hard drive is usb and which isn't, but if it were me I'd try to install a fresh Ubuntu onto whichever HD is physically inside the new computer (not a fan of USB HD's for a system drive, not as reliable it seems). Using a Ubuntu live iso/cd/usb, and with the old USB HD not even plugged in. Then with the new Ubuntu in the new ...


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Install gparted to your system using the below command: sudo apt-get install gparted Then boot using - Ubuntu Live CD and select the option "Try Ubuntu" at startup, then your will be able to use Gparted to resizing your Ubuntu root partition. Hope this helps,


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I'd expect windows would normally allocate all the space in a HD, so just in case he means "free space" inside his 3 partitions (and there really isn't 150GB of unpartitioned HD space) then you'd need to shrink one of the partitions and make some unallocated/unpartitioned space for a new Ubuntu partition. The solution could be to run gparted (if from ...


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You can try formatting that unallocated space as ext4 from Ubuntu Live CD/USB using gparted. Choose "Try Ubuntu" option during installation of Ubuntu. To launch gparted, open a terminal by pressing ctrl+alt+t and typing sudo gparted.


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You need to "unmount" it - "safely remove" is just a - arguably - nicer wording. You should be able to see this option when right clicking on the device in your file manager, if you can't find dedicated external devices menu.


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Make sure you have the entire ISO file downloaded. It should be 981MB. Twice I downloaded the iso from the site, but it wasn't the full file although there were no errors with the D/L or indications that it didn't complete.


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When I get you right you are running a new installed Ubuntu on your internal hardrive and you have Problems to mount your (unchanged) external hardrive where you store your Windows files. Which filesystem do you use on the external hardrive and do you have several partitions. I experienced some troubles with external hardrives when not cleanly unmounted at ...


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I'm using Greyhole and it fits almost perfectly to my use case: home server re-use of spare hdds with different brands, models, sizes all hdds space can be seen as one big mount point (like jbod) you can set different shares with different needs of redundancy (ie. Photos=max redundancy, Data=simple redundancy, Movies=zero redundancy) hdds upgrade can be ...


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It turns out an xfs_repair is all I needed, it just took a long time since the drives are so large, wipefs doesn't delete the secondary superblocks so xfs is able to recover itself


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I don't know about FS recovery exactly like this, and I don't know if XFS has backup superblocks or something that could help. Maybe wipefs didn't erase much, it says When used without options -a or -o, it lists all visible filesystems and the offsets of their signatures. Does running wifefs -n (the -n , --no-act to make sure nothing else gets erased ...


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First off, I'd use the built-in format function in the Disk panel. However, your mistake is that you're not root. This is very easy to fix. Change your command to: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=1024 Now, run it. When it asks you for your password, enter it. You will not see characters Generally, whenever you see Permission Denied, it means you ...


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Your problem is likely a combination of hardware issues and damaged directory structures from not ejecting the disk properly. If Disk Utility is unable to repair any filesystem damage, replacing the disk is the best option. Quit using the disk until you have a replacement. Recover the data you can to the new drive. You may be able to get some additional life ...


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Warning This will take some time, so start this before going to bed. ;) Warning If there is a power failure during this operation you will loose all of your data, so do a full system backup before starting. Download, burn and boot the gparted live CD Shrink /dev/sda5 to 1GByte move /dev/sda6 to the left next to /dev/sda5 extend /dev/sda6 to the end of the ...


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Check the "delete on destination" checkbox in the "basic options" tab. It's like specifying the -d option in rsync which will delete files and folders that are not on the source disk.


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Have you tried using the Boot-Repair tool? It is one of the suggested tools for boot repair on Ubuntu's Help pages. Assuming you can/know how to change your BIOS settings to boot from a USB flash drive, you could use your Windows HDD to download it and make a bootable USB stick to try and repair GRUB with your Ubuntu HDD. You would need to download a ...


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Wiping generally means to overwrite a partition/drive with other data (nulls, zeros, random) to completely destroy all data and prevent recovery. Formatting is to put a new filesystem on a partition, possibly on top of an old partition leaving the old data still recoverable but normally unseen. The Ubuntu installer should let you pick a partition to format ...


0

Apparantly, after a final reboot, the disk space went up to 736.5 GB (The File Manager says GiB, using PCManFM), I might have a bad partition, or need a new hard drive, but I'm getting a shiny new 6TB HDD for Christmas, I should backup everything to transfer there...


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Not sure if you are deleting large files, but one immediate troubleshoot would be to check your trash. Ubuntu counts the trash against the disk space, i.e. it does not auto-clear but requires you to explicitly empty it before the space taken up by deleted files is made available for use.


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This issue seems to be related to a bad block issue on your HDD. There is an awesome tool - WHDD to fix that http://whdd.org/ No one can promise you that you'll restore all your data on you HDD, but it might be real to do that.


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If you are on a "moderate" level of computer usage (meaning far more than the average user and knowing enough to be...dangerous), you COULD try putting that HDD into an external case and use another computer with software-based file recovery software, like Recuva, Puran, or Glary Undelete. They may not be able to recover your stuff, but it's worth a try ...


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Ugh. My friend, you're more or less out of luck. When you format and install you overwrite your old data with new data. There's an outside chance some kind of data forensics could restore part of your windows partition, but those services are very expensive. Part of experimenting with Linux is breaking your computer! Welcome!


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Did you read this from Yumi? Important Note: YUMI was intended to be used to try to run various "LIVE Linux" Operating Systems from USB. Installing Linux from the YUMI created USB Drive to a Hard Drive is not officially supported. If the installer portion of any Live Linux distro does work, consider it a bonus. As it should work, ubuntu provides you ...


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The trash is usually located in ~/.local/share/Trash. If you can login using a TTY, or mount the partition containing your home directory, that's the folder you want to delete: rm -r .local/share/Trash If you mounted your partition on a live CD, you would need to do: rm -r /media/ubuntu/<Partition Name>/home<your user name>/.local/share/Trash ...



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