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Differences with Windows In Windows, you will be used to "Computer" as referring to a presention of all disks and partitions on the first viewing level. On Ubuntu, things are arranged a bit differently. When you look at the left pane of a nautilus window, under "devices", you will find something comparible to "Computer" on Windows. However, the ...


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I assume that you have installed Ubuntu on 320GB HD which you have already used for WinXP. The problem may occur if you have selected "Erase and Use the entire disk" option while installing Ubuntu which might have formatted your partition. If not, please check whether you see any disk drives under "Devices" option to the left, while viewing the "Home" ...


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By default only devices mounted in "/media" will be shown in the sidebar. And whan there is no fstab entry those devices will be mounted in "/media". So change /mnt/extra_storage to /media/extra_storage and Nautilus will pick it up. There is also a dconf setting that can be set to prevent mounting:


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If your device is always called /dev/sdd1 (but it probably isn't), all you need to do is add a line to /etc/fstab: /dev/sdd1 /media/mpdr1 ntfs defaults,users 0 0 Since the device name is actually likely to change, a better way would be to use the UUID of the drive. So, first use blkid to get the correct UUID and then, add this line to /etc/fstab ...


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I found this command: (mountpoint -q "/media/mpdr1" && df /media/mpdr1/* > /dev/null 2>&1) || ((sudo umount "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && (sudo mkdir "/media/mpdr1" > /dev/null 2>&1 || true) && sudo mount "/dev/sdd1" "/media/mpdr1") Where the mount point is /media/mpdr1 and the FS is ...


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psusi nails it. if you read the data sheets (white papers) say at SeaGate.com? you will see how HDD's are made, tested and how to really work. there is no perfect HDD, never was, never will be, (history and fact) in the olden days, (me) we had to enter the bad sectors in to the HDD controller from the comes with paper, in the new drive box, so the controller ...


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Installing ntfs-progs or ntfs-3g should fix the issue you're experiencing. I don't think it matters which of the two you install, you can the Ubuntu Documentation to see if one of the two is preferred. I recall one of the two being preferred in Arch Linux but I don't recall which. You can check to see if you already have them installed using: dpkg -l | ...


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Probably it is your system partition and you should not delete it. To determine, check the output of mount: $ mount /dev/md0p5 on / type reiserfs (rw) proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev) none on /sys/fs/cgroup type tmpfs (rw) none on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw) none on ...


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I have a 40 GB Volume in My Drives. It has folders like bin, boot, home, sys, root, etc That is the equivalent to your C: drive in Windows (well not totally true but you get the drift?). Removing is would be deleting the operating system so no, it will not be possible to remove and get extra space. Or is it required to be there? Yes and I would ...


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In Linux you actually can remove files that are used by an application. In that case the folder entry gets removed immediately so you can't see the file any longer but the actual file content only gets freed when the application closes the file. Files removed by the system or due to hardware bugs usually don't end up in the trash but just disappear. Only ...


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This could be the sign of your hard disk is at the end of its life. If possible, try using a new hard disk and see if the problem persist. Other problems may include such as faulty motherboard, faulty power supply, or loose wire connections. It can be your RAM, but this is quite rare.


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I always use liveUSBs because they are far, far faster. A liveCD likely will not give you a good experience. This is where you can download Ubuntu. http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop This is how you can turn any flash drive into a liveUSB using the downloaded .iso. If you need to use a CD, the link should be on this page as well. ...


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Can Microsoft trace previously pirated license from Computer HDD. Yes. It is possible to redo a format to some extent (with "testdisk"). But doing so would probably be far more costly then letting it slip since they need to get there hands on your system (and that probably requires a court order in most countries). Mind you: if you bought the system ...


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dd allows you to write data directly to a block device, but doing so to a physical device requires root. sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX Change the X to whatever drive you wish to wipe, and use either sd or hd, depending on your disk type. This doesn't really protect your data though. Anything in memory could still be read (in theory) by your employeer. ...


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I'm not aware of any methods for deleting a drive while an operating system runs from it (at least not in it's entirity), but cloning your OS to a ramdrive could be a potential work-around. Once booted into the ramdrive your host system drive can be low level formatted using dd. Steps: Step #1 In terminal type: sudo mkdir /workingfolder sudo -i sudo ...


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If you can log in long enough, maybe switch to a virtual terminal by hitting ctrl-alt and a function key from 1-6. Log in and watch the kernel log by running 'tail -f /var/log/kern.log' Either wait and see what happens w/o doing anything, or switch back to X with ctrl-alt-F7 (might be F8) and use it until it locks up. Hopefully, after locking up (since it ...


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I'm not sure what you intend is ethical, but I would suggest dd. Something along the lines of: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/your_favourite_sda_device should work just fine. It seems that you need root privileges, but I'm not sure that it matters whether the partition is mounted or not.


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In short, NO you cannot delete the boot disk while it is Mounted....


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Windows 8 has a feature called Fast Boot that makes the system partially hibernate every time you shutdown. You should turn it off if you want to access your Windows drives from Ubuntu


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That is not a Partition problem. It just means that Windows 8 was closed in a unsafe way (Power down while using Windows, You hibernated or suspended the Windows 8 session or any other option than shutting down Windows the normal way). In Windows 8, Microsoft introduced a "new" feature when shutting down that it actually not shutdown the PC but hibernated ...


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"mount the volume read-only with the 'ro' mount option." read only means you can extract the files from it. So why not follow that advice if all you want is to extract the files? Command would be something like this: sudo mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sdb1 /media/dugi/Store -o ro,noatime (mind the ro for readonly and none of the options in -o can have spaces ...


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Here are the 2 cases I that I have tried when using an SSD and an HDD: Windows + Ubuntu Case - I am assuming you have Windows on the SSD which is taking some part of the 32 GB space and the 500 is used to store other files. So the best thing would be, if you are able to get from the SSD at least 8 GB to 16 GB is to install Ubuntu in the SSD (Share it with ...


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Basically, This is more about how you use your system. Since you have tagged your question with "dual boot", I consider you will have Win7 or Win8 as your second OS. If you do not intend to use Ubuntu as your primary OS or do not want to install too many games/softwares then meeting the minimum Ubuntu Requirement+3GB on SSD will be enough for you. Note, ...


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I also had the same screen when I put it in the USB 2.0 but when I plugged it into the USB 3.0 port then it would be detected and you can see it with lsusb.


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From the link in comment: Recovery Button Pressing the recovery button while powering up the device resets the admin user name and password to default without erasing shared folders or volumes. The recovery button also resets network configuration to DHCP (obtain an IP address automatically). Follow the instructions below to reset the device using the ...


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The only way to unlock it is to format it. This is how to do it: Open Gparted Right click on the partition and click Unmount Right click on the partition and click Format


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Can you slave a linux HD in a Windows PC to retrieve files? Yes, you can! It is less time consuming to boot live and copy stuff off if you have an external HD. There are things to be concerned with if you don't have an external HD and you really want to slave it in: Do you know how to slave a disk? Did you install with LVM? Will you install the Ext ...


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You can try the following to speed up you Chrome browser: Go to Settings - Show Advanced Settings - Content Settings - Plugins. Once you are in the Plugins section, choose 'Disable Individual Plugins' option. Next you must check the 'Details' button so you have a closer look at your individual plugins. Disable the following plugins for good: Shockwave ...


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I installed dual boot xp and ubuntu 12.0.4 I found that I could select "something else" when it comes to where to install ubutnu, then select the drive and partition that you do not want disturbed and select edit or something like that and select "do not use" (do not make any other changes to it) and do the same on all of the partitions used by your other ...


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The discard option is no longer suggested for SSD-hosted filesystems, as it slows things down because the Linux kernel has a non-optimized implementation of the command. (IIRC, TRIM requests only use one ATA sector range at a time, making it slow.) Instead, create a daily cron job that runs fstrim -v / (or whatever your SSD partitions are). This is the ...


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If you remove one or the other OS, you can grow the remaining partition using tools such as parted, or several other options that you can find on the web. -OR- you can just partition the second partition as a secondary drive.


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When Windows was first installed, the device drivers were installed for the old PC's hardware. Because I installed a new motherboard with a different chipset and CPU there is no way to boot Windows from this old hard-drive without replacing the drivers and settings on the old HDD which is not practical and may make the OS unstable. Re-installing Windows on ...


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Since you can't boot from a USB/CD-ROM, if you have another HDD that has Ubuntu on it, you can mount the HDD (I'm assuming it's either SATA or IDE ports on the motherboard) and boot off of it instead of the old HDD. Gparted is a tool than you use can partition the other drive for you. Basically, you can substitute a LiveCD with a HDD with ubuntu with it. ...


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I just found out how to do it. Just boot to ubuntu from live boot cd/usb. gparted will be there already. Just open it. Then right click swap area and do swap off. Next, right click the extended partition and then select resize. Resize the extended partition. Then commit your changes. Right click the extended partition then, switch the swap on. Thats it. ...


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From own experience: 'ungraceful' detachment of a removable device resulted in inconsistent reference to the volume's first sector in the mbr partition table. Using a Disk editor (e.g. wxHexEditor), locate the ntfs boot sector. Make sure this lies on sector 63 (64th sector). Tas


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Okay, I have to justify the trust given. First of all, you should update your BIOS. Ubuntu is very dependent on this. I can show you the way how to overcome impossibility of booting from CD, but you may experience some problems after installation if you don't update your BIOS. Now, How to boot from CD even if BIOS doesn't allow this Download and install ...


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Run into Live Mode using a Latest version of Ubuntu ISO or Gparted DVD. Later, while partitioning with "Gparted", when Gparted prompts for 1 MB left over space before the first Partition just allow it (This is the most Vital step.) By default "Align to MiB" will be selected. Don't Change that. Do the rest of the partitioning normally. After you finish, to ...


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I'm not 100% sure what you are trying to achieve here but this command: hdparm --security-unlock $(printf '\x48\x65\x6C\x6C\x6F\x20\x57\x6F\x72\x6C\x64') /dev/sdc would send the listed hexadecimal values from the printf command to hdparm and should produce security_password="Hello World" /dev/sdc: Issuing SECURITY_UNLOCK command, ...


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I am not an expert on linux but I found this online, which might be helpful. http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/35676/how-to-choose-a-partition-scheme-for-your-linux-pc/ As far as I understand, for a linux installation, you basically need a system partition, in ext4 format and a swap area. You can also build separate partition for your home folder and other ...


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For PC without UEFI Method 1 You can try EasyBCD Download EasyBCD here [Just type any name or email-id and click "Download!"] See instruction using EasyBCD If your PC have UEFI following will work Method 2 Intall Windows 8 Download Boot-Repair Disk here and burn it to any disk. Boot that Disk and click "Recommanded Repair". OR Method 3 Install ...


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Basically, use whatever partition table you want to. Because it is on second disk it won't affect Ubuntu installation or GRUB. Just make sure that you have installed GRUB (and updated its configuration) on disk with Ubuntu installed, so it can recognise Windows installation. In your BIOS, select drive with Ubuntu to boot first and that should be it.


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I figured this out. Just for posterity sake, I used this resource: http://www.scottalanmiller.com/linux/2012/04/22/adding-new-drives-to-an-hp-proliant-smartarray-with-lvm/ Essentially I was missing the HPACUCLI utility that is needed to pass logical drives through to the LVM. The controller saw them, it just was not passing them through to linux. Pretty ...


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Yes, you can. I actually did that very recently. Here's how I did it. I connected the drive that I wanted to install Ubuntu onto. I then created a rawvmdk image so that I could give direct access to the disk to a VirtualBox guest. I then mounted a CD image on that guest, using the rawvmdk disk image as harddisk. I then simply booted the guest and installed ...


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No, you can't prevent it from starting when you boot up the computer.


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Yes. Use gparted and resize the extended partition, then you can either resize your logical partition or create another one as fleamour says.


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You need to grow the extended partition till it assimilates the unused capacity, then you will be able to format. It needs to be within the boundary of the extended, as you can only have 4 MBR partitions or 3 + 1 extended with 5 or more partitions being within/part of the extended partition itself.


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1) Reduce the default grub load time: you can simply use the following command to open grub configuration: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub & And change GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 to GRUB_TIMEOUT=2. This will change the boot time to 2 seconds. Prefer not to put 0 here as you will lost the privilege to change between OS and recovery options. Once you have changed ...


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Run a SMART test on the disk. You can do this in Linux using tools like smartctl (text-mode) or GSmartControl (GUI). Unfortunately, the results can be a little hard to interpret, particularly for the text-mode tools, so feel free to post back with the complete results if you need help interpreting them. (Post text-mode output to a pastebin site, if ...


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If you're using a journaling filesystem it's possible a bad block or other hiccup was encountered during the writing of the journal. That would force the filesystem to go read-only.


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No way. SMART is a hardware test. And Reallocated Sectors is one of the important. If the value is actually increasing, find a replacement disk now and leave this one for nonimportant data. However, I have an HDD which has this parameter bad for years already, but the number of bad sectors is not increaing.



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