New answers tagged

0

The drive doesn't look psychically damaged. Luckily, hard drives do not have feelings. ;) However, I am sorry to inform you that your drive looks physically damaged or at least is reaching failure: does instantly give the same output if I run the command again without unplugging the drive This basically means "not good". The things you must ...


0

I've dealt with the same issue few days ago. You need windows installation usb/dvd. Boot and repair boot manager. Then update grub update from ubuntu live usb.


0

Partition Table: loop says that there is no partition table. The file system occupies the entire disk. mount /dev/sdb should work. NOT /dev/sdb1


0

Before thinking it's a dead drive wih firm conviction, go for the cheaper possibility and replace the cable. If that works you saved yourself from having to buy a new drive at the expense of a fraction of the cost for a new drive.


1

You can check your HDD without need of log in, as Mark Kirby pointed out. Just create a Live USB where you can install HDD checkers. Create a Live USB For instructions, refer to The Ubuntu download page, under "Easy ways to switch to Ubuntu" Check the HDD state Refer to How can I check the health of my hard drive?


1

Linux systems don't mount hard drives, they mount filesystems that live inside partitions or logical volumes on those drives. In the case of ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystems, you can change the UUID using the tune2fs command. From man tune2fs: -U UUID Set the universally unique identifier (UUID) of the filesystem to UUID. The format of the UUID ...


0

UUID can't be assigned manually, as far as I know. It's generated algorithmically during a format, to ensure it's globally unique, and being able to change it to an arbitrary value would allow duplications. Editing /etc/fstab can tell the OS to automatically mount a drive during startup. This preferably uses UUID to identify the drive. The existing UUID ...


0

Laptop or desktop computer? How old? Drives don't mount in BOTH Windows and Ubuntu Live CD, yes? Do these drive work on another computer? Your USB ports may not be supplying enough power to run the external hard disks, especially if they're 7200 RPM drives (which use more current). You might try using a POWERED USB hub. Plug the hub into the computer USB ...


2

welcome, assuming you are using a 4 gb RAM computer, you will have delete that 500GB patition indicating SWAP , the right click on the unlocated new 500Gb which will appear in grey color and allocated 4 gb as swap by selecting file system as Linux-Swap in G-Parted and click add, the remaining vlume you will create a new file system by right clicking on it ...


3

The reason you cant view it is because its been allocated for swap which is a waste allocating it 500GB its good to allocate it a size equal to RAM size of your PC. Re partition that 1Tb disks 500GB extended prtition in live mode by using Gparted and allocated a memory slightly equal to your RAM size then the rest you can use it for other purposes.doing this ...


1

You should change owners. run this command sudo chown newuser: /media/kalenpw/HDD Instead of the "newuser" put your Ubuntu user


0

Intro First of all for anyone who is having the same issue on Ubuntu 16.04, it is currently an ongoing bug and as of now, to my knowledge, has not been fixed. You can visit the github conversation here to see the bug I am referencing. Secondly I am writing this post as an enthusiast and intermediate linux user, I am not a developer or currently work on ...


1

Usually in Linux world all user's own data and configurations are placed in home directory /home/username/ For example Firefox save its profile data in /home/username/.mozilla/firefox/profilename.default So to backup or sync application data between computers you need to find where it stored in your home directory and just copy application's data ...


0

If you can boot live Ubuntu, then you should use GParted , a free partition editor. First, unmount your hard disk (right click -> Unmount). Then you will see Format to and choose ntfs file system. Apply the changes and that´s it. Also, there is answer about formatting from terminal. Hope it will be helpful to you. Don´t forget to make backup!


0

try to use this in terminal sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdXY where XY is the name of the drive for example sda4


0

try to use this in terminal sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdc2


1

I'm having the same issue. Is (was?) bcache in writeback mode? In writeback mode, bcache keeps a buffer of so-called dirty data on the cache. By default, this is 10% of the cache size. It does this to collect sequential data to write to the backing device, since HDDs are good at sequential IO (see koverstreet's post from May 15, 2012 3:43 UTC at this link). ...


0

You are allowed to make a maximum of 4 primary partitions in a Disk thats why it cant create a 5th one. The solution to this you can use a partition tool like gparted which comes in ubuntu live cd or even bootable flash drive and create an EXTENDED PARTITION by choosing Create As : Extended Partition instead of Primary Partition


1

Type ntfs-label /dev/sdxx and store this for future reference. Type ntfs-label /dev/sdxx <new label>. Type ntfs-label /dev/sdxx <new label> again. This should work because it overwrites both labels. If this dosen't work you may need to reformat the disk. If it has nothing on it, just run the following command: mkfs.ntfs /dev/sdxx If it ...


0

The file system of Ubuntu is not recognized by Windows. There are applications out there that will allow you to mount the Ext4 file system. Do NOT overwrite the MBR as that will prevent you from booting into Ubuntu. EDIT: Here is a helpful link from HowToGeek that will give you 3 applications to mount the drives, but you can only use them as read-only (...


0

You could try overwriting the MBR of the pendrive, with: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/YOUR_DISK bs=512 count=1 You can check the device of YOUR_DISK with sudo fdisk -l. Notice that with this, you will lose the contents of the pendrive, but it should be detected again after that. You will have to format it again afterwards.


0

What's on the HD that you're trying to use? If it's not a NTFS or EXT2/3/4 partition, you won't see it in the File Manager (Nautilus). In the terminal, type "lsusb" and see if the disk at least shows up there. Please give more details. Cheers, Al


1

I did a Google on "WD Caviar Green 2TB disable energy saving" and found a number of hits. It probably has to do with the WD's attempt at saving energy by parking the heads, or spinning down the drive. You might look at: http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/archive/1367904 http://serverfault.com/questions/242891/disable-caviar-green-drives-spinning-down which ...


-1

I have no experience with Btrfs (more experience with ZFS) but for attention to partitions, the first utility that comes to mind is gdisk(8). GPT fdisk text-mode partitioning tool An outline: $ sudo gdisk GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 1.0.1 Type device filename, or press <Enter> to exit: /dev/sda Partition table scan: MBR: protective BSD: not ...


0

Make sure all the parts are properly connected and retry in another usb 3.0 slot. When you say the hdd is not running, do you mean it doesn't show up in the file manager?


0

Steam isn't displaying after running [Kubuntu] @Nick Weinberg solved the OS migrating problem (edited out of original post) Sound solution: Plugged earphones into monitor to see if youtube video sound would output (didn't work) but upon removing the headphones the sound came out of the monitor speakers Stuttering start menu and youtube videos: go to ...


0

This is a common problem when bootable USB are not created properly (if you search "Ubuntu installation stuck at Detecting Files System" you will find many related questions in this forum or in Ubuntuforums website). I recommend you to follow the official guidelines about creating a bootable USB from Windows. See them here. In particular, it is always ...


0

Reinstalling the faulty kernel, as advised here, didn't work. Removing the faulty kernel worked, as explained in this other answer.


0

I've done this with external HDDs using Ubuntu 16.04, 14.04 and 12.04, I'm assuming that is what you're attempting. I recommend using these as a base to troubleshoot from, then if needed remount the drive. I start with Gparted to identify the device, usually its /dev/sdb1 or similar. Then I find the device, there is a drop down in the top right (at the ...


1

It is possible to reset the login password without logging in. I do not know how a password reset affects access to an encrypted drive, however. See the procedure below: http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/resetpassword Good luck.


2

If you overwrote a partition, and now want to restore data, and can't mount the disk, you have a problem. First thing to do is not to write to that disk anymore. You can use a utility like Photorec to recover files on that disk. If the partition table is overwritten, which seems to be the case, filenames and file dates are gone. If you have a backup, use ...


2

Hopefully, the NTFS partition's list of locations on the disk where the data for each file lies is correct. The fix under that condition is fairly easy if you can copy the files to a different drive. Here's how: Remount the drive read-only The first thing to do is to stop all writing to the drive. Remount it read-only by opening a terminal (press Ctrl+Alt+...


0

some errors can be fixed. if the mag on the disk has faded, repeatedly writing to it can re mag the sector. how ever if it is physical damage, then it can't be repaired. it is marked as bad, and not used.this is not a problem, unless the bad sector is in a critical area, ie the boot, partition, fat sectors.


0

If you're setting up new partitions on the new drive, you'd might as well use encrypted partitions with cryptsetup / LUKS. eCryptfs and EncFS are for encrypting some folders on a filesystem, LUKS is for encrypting an entire partition. See archwiki for a good overview of different disk encryption systems. With the new partition(s) encrypted, then you can ...


5

I have Ubuntu on a USB, but when I enter recovery mode before I can reinstall Ubuntu, I obviously get asked for the password. Is there anyway around this? I think you're missing a key step - boot from the Ubuntu USB drive. As it is, it sounds like you're not booting from the Ubuntu USB at all, and only getting stuck booting from the encrypted hard drive. ...


5

The -b option is for choosing a block device like /dev/sdb1. You can find this out by typing udisksctl unlock --help for instance; replace unlock with mount, unmount and lock and you will see the -b option is used in the same way for all 4 cases.


3

The udisks command line tool udisksctl is a command-line program used to interact with the udisksd(8) daemon process.The -b option denotes a block-device like /dev/sdb1


0

If you're trying to remove the partition from within Windows, it is very possible and simple to do. Open Disk Management, you can find it by right click on start on Windows 8/10, or from control panel in 7. From here you will see a graphical display of all disks connected to the system. Find the external drive, it's usually disk 1, since computers start ...


1

Disks GUI program controls fstab. You can go there and put your partitions mount options on automatic by switching it off and on again. I think it will rebuild your fstab to the default mode.


33

If you can't remember the password, then that's all she wrote. All you can do is install a new OS. You don't need to enter recovery mode to do that. Just boot up the live USB and carry out the normal installation process. The hard drive will get overwritten.


2

List backup superblocks: sudo dumpe2fs /dev/sda1 | grep -i backup then use backup superblock, 32768 just an example, try several sudo fsck -b 32768 /dev/sda1 One user could not get partition unmounted (may have needed swapoff), but used another live distro Only the newer fdisk in 16.04 will correctly show gpt partitions. Use parted or gdisk. sudo ...


3

One way I found to solve this problem is to use the UUIDs, create a mount point for my USB drive and add a listing to the /etc/fstab file so the USB drive is mounted the same every time on boot up. I have a Seagate 3TB External USB, so this is what I did: First, created a mount point for the Seagate drive: Create one mount point for each partition you ...


2

Currently there's no way to securely erase files on SSD without erasing the content of the whole drive or access to the firmware of the SSD. It's impossible to know where the SSD may store previous copies of a logical block. To make matters worse, due to journalling and copy-on-write mechanisms of the file system it may be impossible to know which logical ...


0

I/O errors usually refer to physical damage to the hardware. Hard reset goes really heavy on the hardware, so it would not surprise me that by doing it again and again (14.04, 15.10, 16.04, how many times did you do it?) finally you managed to break your hard drive! :) My suggestion is to stop using it immediately, switch to a live session and save as much ...


0

You can find aditional information in syslog grep 'Mounted' /var/log/syslog* or find mounted and unmounted logs grep 'Mounted\|Unmounted' /var/log/syslog*


1

This is due to not having enough power for the usb storage device and can be fixed by providing more power either by mains or by a dual usb cable.


0

I did it several time on desktop PC with no issue at all. Try to move the hdd from one PC to the other. Windows is somehow linked to the motherboard of your PC so it make not possible physical migration of an hard drive while with Ubuntu is possible.


2

It may work fine and it may crash and burn. There's no real way of telling. Since the two computers are somewhat similar, you may have better luck than others, but there's still no way of knowing. The best you can do is try and see. If it boots up, that's great. If it doesn't work, your only option is really to manually transfer things over.


0

Solved the problem using: https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-convert-my-drive-to-GPT-without-losing-data-and-my-partitions Great!


0

First off it is NEVER recommended to run any operating system on an ANY external drive. That being said I have had a similar problem. If your external drive is a HDD meaning it has a spinning disk then the problem is that your bios wants to boot something faster then you external drive can spin up. To fix this go into BIOS and most likely a boot tab and look ...



Top 50 recent answers are included