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An easy (and not very expensive) option to come around these issues would be to put the storage HDD into an external enclousure (USB or eSATA).


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You can install the bootloader on the other HDD. Boot a live system and enter lsblk to find out the name of your booting HDD. For me the output is $ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 238.5G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 100M 0 part ├─sda2 8:2 0 79.9G 0 part ├─sda3 8:3 0 1K 0 part ├─sda5 8:5 0 5G ...


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df -h Copy the location where the drive is mounted. Then enter sudo chmod -R 777 /mounted/on/location


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To determine whether the problem is the drive or the enclosure, remove the drive from the enclosure, install it in a desktop with sufficient power and check the smart status. For a deeper test, you can check every sector of the drive utilizing tools like ddrescue. ddrescue will report error size during the process and you can attempt data recovery at the ...


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Although the real cause of the problem was already pointed out, I want to add the same answer, since I have some 4 external HDDs. Any computer that is manufactured, assumes that the power source will be used accordingly to the specifications of the configuration and at most an overload of 20% Any external USB device HAS TO BE POWERED FROM AN EXTERNAL ...


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What you have is a free fall sensor, (accelerometer) whether it is failing, or giving erroneous data, I'm not sure. I recomend you black list the free fall sensor, and depending on how critical your hard disk drive space is, delete or clear the syslog file as well. sudo > /var/adm/sylog I am suspicious that there is another issue as well, that logs ...


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First boot to Windows (as you seem to have a dual boot system) and: chkdsk /f X: where X is the drive letter of the FAT partition. then mount with: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/external (no options) and that should fix it...


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In order to have a separate home partition, set the mountpoint off the HDD as /home when you format it in the Ubuntu Setup.


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Just install Ubuntu as you normally would and install all updates, but stay away from proprietary software! That way, it'll just boot when you move the HDs as contrarily to Windows, there are no drivers just modules and these are are built into the kernel, so all hardware supported by the kernel will just work out of the box! Once the hard drive is in the ...


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After a long search I've found what the problem was. When I installed my system I added this line in my fstab: /dev/disk/by-uuid/5E521E0E521DEC11 /mnt/data auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0 I changed it to: /dev/disk/by-uuid/5E521E0E521DEC11 /mnt/data auto nosuid,nodev,gid=1000,umask=007,nofail,x-gvfs-show 0 0 My groupid is 1000 and the umask ...


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I am chasing a similar issue and I am using intotify to see what files have been accessed to track down the program that is accessing them. This command will watch a specific directory for X minutes: inotifywatch -v -e access -e modify -t "$TIME" -r "$STORAGE" Replace "$TIME" with the length in seconds to watch for and "$STORAGE" with the directory you ...


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Sorry for posting this as an answer, but the comments are too small to say what I need to say... :( You had a GPT on your /sda and a MBR on your /sdb... It's not a huge problem, but is the origin of your original problem: effectively, the UEFI boot partitions on the other computers in your lab didn't know about the Ubuntu boot loader as they are missing ...


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If you can successfully boot into linux at all I bet everything is installed correctly. You have to go into windows system settings. Turn off fast boot. windows defaults to this every update and hijacks the boot for itself. disable fast boot I hope this helps.


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I just needed to fix the BootLoader, and then it allowed me to choose between Windows and Ubuntu now.


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If you partition your drive, you can make your USB stick bootable (I personally like the rufus program to do this, but there are other options) then go into the bios and change the boot order to USB. This will allow you to load Ubuntu as if you had the disc. In the setup portion on ubuntu you can choose where to install ubuntu. If the hdd is partitioned, you ...


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The fact that you're getting I/O errors from at least two programs is telling. Such errors almost never result from software problems -- and when it is a software problem, it's likely to be a bad driver. I didn't notice anything obvious in the SMART test results you posted, so my guess is you've got a bad cable to the hard disk, or possibly a bad disk ...


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I am not an expert on this, but I have been messing with the boot order for a while, so telling from my some-what experience: So like the same way you get into UEFI settings, go to the BIOS settings (you can go to Advance Start-up, choose troubleshoot, advance options, then choose UEFI Firmware Settings - restart to get into it) [like you normally do]. After ...


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Read error rate is an index whose value it's meaningful only if interpreted based on a manufacturer's guideline, since there's no standard way to implement it. Conversely, the Reallocated sector count index is very alarming: 3736544 sectors * 512B = 1913110528B = 1.91GB~, and this means that almost 2GB worth of sectors are gone already. So, to answer your ...


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I found a link with several solutions, one of the latter is a program that may give you a work around. The pmount software may be a fast solution, if you try it let me know if it works please. sudo apt-get install pmount pmount <device> [ label ] e.g pmount /dev/sda1 to unmount pumount https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Mount/USB Hope ...


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Change /mnt/data owner and group to yourself like this: sudo chown basement21.basement21 /mnt/data And allow only you to read and write, and your personal group to only read: sudo chmod 750 /mnt/data


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You can try this: Create a new file like quirks.conf in /etc/modprobe.d/ with the following content: options usb-storage quirks=<VID>:<PID>:u The format is quirks=<VID>:<PID>:u Where <VID> is the VendorId And <PID> is the ProductId of your quirky usb device, which may be found via lsusb. The 'u' flag disables uas ...


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I assume "everything to my HDD" refers to data stored in your /home directory? When you installed Ubuntu it creates a / root directory - where all your data is stored in sub-folders which can be mounted onto the HDD. You also have a swap partition, I recommend putting /home directory on your HDD, but you may have to use a live disk of Ubuntu as the drive ...


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You'll only lose data if you shrink the partition too far. Use the Windows partitioning tools to shrink the partition a safe amount. Doing this manually with a such limited space is dangerous. How to do this: Click on your start menu and type in "defragment". A tool for this will appear. Select it, and defragment your hard drive (this is to get the maximum ...


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I have broken a system by shrinking the Windows partition using Linux tools. (I asked about it in this question.) Based on my experience, I would advise shrinking the Windows partition using Windows tools, then moving over to the installer. That said, this is a mighty small drive you are working with, and you may run into trouble because of that.


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Resizing a hard-drive would not cause data loss. But 40GB hard drive is not meant to be shrinked so as to install another OS. I assume you are a Windows XP or Windows 7 user. Windows would require free space so as to accommodate new programs, page file changes if any etc. Hence, I request you to think again before you proceed toward installing Ubuntu.


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Most of the programs you install in Ubuntu, with the package manager will go to somewhere under /usr. However, other locations will also take up considerable space (/var/lib, I'm looking at you!). Steam, however, is a different beast. Although some of it's libraries are installed under /usr, the bulk of it is installed somewhere else: ~/.local, which is ...


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Not sure about Ubuntu's programs, but with Steam you can specify another partition. When you go to install a game choose the drop down and choose create a new library on /boot then this will open where you can install to. Goto /media/YOURUSER/Your drive..folder. Then you can create a folder here and install games to it.


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The easiest way to accomplish this is to: boot with the Windows 8 repair disk repair sda Use the BIOS to boot.


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To find out if any hardware is certified for running under Ubuntu head to the Official Ubuntu Certification catalog and choose your hardware from there... Furthermore, specific hardware recommendations are off-topic on this site... :-(


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The solution below assumes your friend is not an expert, trying to hack your computer to find a way to look into your data. It is however a reasonable threshold, to prevent unintended access (mounting) to a specific partition or drive. An option, that also can be used as a more temporary solution on any user account is the following: Add the following ...


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To achieve the desire result as you indicated: Call your system to recognize /dev/sdb to belong to you: sudo adduser secretdrive sudo chown secretdrive:secretdrive /dev/sdb sudo adduser [your-username] secretdrive sudo chmod 770 /dev/sdb Explanation: assign a new system name to your drive: /dev/sdb chown-ize your drive to the system username of ...


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Attach the HDD to a Windows machine (or boot Windows) and run: chkdsk X: /f where X is the drive letter under Windows.


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Well, I did some research to find out that my conception was wrong; and I do have an answer. The Linux/Ubuntu /dev/ folder contains a list of device IO interfaces, not so much files. Here's a link to where I discovered this. So, instead of reading a file, and dumping it to a file, I was reading an output stream, and dumping it to a file. Of course, output ...


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Was running dd really the first thing that came to your mind? If you buy used hardware you should always check its condition visually before installing it. You don't want to damage your system by carelessly installing hardware with short circuits. After that you can install the hardware and check if it is detected properly by looking into system logfiles. ...


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dd is "block copy" program, not formatter. Try using sudo fdisk /dev/sdb and create single primary partition with n command (then p and accept suggested values). Don't forget to write changes with w before quitting with q. This way fsck will create new Master Boot Record on that disk. Then comes actual format process of your choice (initiating ...


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I am aware that hdd manufacturers write firmware on the hdd platters (it has been done like this since more modern drives have firmware requirements that outstrip the embedded controller storage availability). I don't know if the firmware hides itself from you by offsetting addresses, and whether dd would be able to ignore or bypass such an offset, but if ...


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Unfortunately, gdisks hasn't seen much development lately, so the "old" way is the "new" way again... The disadvantage of FLOSS at work. :-( So as development is stalled, manuals are probably never going to happen. ;-( Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news...


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The easiest way to copy files is to use the icon that looks like a file cabinet: in the left upper corner of your screen. That is very similar to the Windows File Manage your already know. cp is very similar the the Windows copy command so choose whichever you're comfortable with.


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Quite often this type of problem is caused by lack of sufficient power coming down the USB cable to the drive, and this is particularly likely where the external drive was not bought off-the-shelf but self-assembled. (You would hope that a manufacturer of an external drive would have made sure that USB ports could support it.) A device may draw up to 500 mA ...


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Here are the parts of the syslog that worry me and also how I came to my conclusion about the type of drive this is. This is not an answer just a way to show you and others what I think is wrong as the comments aren't long enough. Here is something very similar to your situation. You might try ddresuce here is a guide... Mar 18 23:52:37 ubuntu kernel: ...


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if your windows disk is NOT automatically showing up in the left navigation of your ubuntu file explorer window, then open a terminal and examine (or just edit into, formatted as blockquote, your original question) the output of the following command: sudo fdisk -l


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Since I wanted to focus on fast booting and starting programs, I decided to try the following: SSD: OS installation, /usr and /opt for programs HDD: /swap, /var, /home I decided to have /var on the HDD as well because I have rather big databases in the /var/lib/mysql and also my /var/www is quite spacious. So far this is working fine. Booting and starting ...


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You can also use lsof aka "List open files": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lsof


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Even though you discourage it, my suggestion is to modify your backup-script to automatically mount your disc before running backup and unmount it afterwards. There are other possibilities, which may or may not work in your case, depends on circumstances: Are you running your backup as root? Where are you mounting second HDD Do you need to have access to ...


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In issues like this one of the most helpful tools if you have access to a Windows PC is chkdsk. I think it should be used as chkdsk /f [drive_letter] to solve any problems related to MFT. NTFS drives do stuff like this very often. Or else you can use ntfsfix from an Ubuntu PC. Make sure you have installed ntfs-3g first. Then run : sudo ntfsfix ...


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find out some information about your new disk. type: lsblk note down the /dev/sdXX now creating a GPT and new partition. type: fdisk /dev/sdXX replace /dev/sdXX with your disk. example: /dev/sdc type the following: d enter w enter this makes sure you deleted any existing partitions... but if its a new HDD then there probably werent any. it ...


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If you install Ubuntu in EFI/UEFI mode, it will use GPT by default. It will probably also use GPT when you install to an over-2TiB disk, although I've recently discovered some cases when it won't do that. (This was when using MAAS to do a fast-path install in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, though, which is relatively exotic.) If you want to be 100% sure of what ...


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What is the type of the file system you are backing files to? I guess since you are backing up on a ubuntu it is ext4. Different filesystems may have differing overhead while allocating space for files. In data storage, the smallest amount of disk space that can be allocated to hold a file is called a cluster. Most files are not the same size as the ...


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I had the same issue and solved it with testdisk. Using this info http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Advanced_FAT_Repair


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I figured it out all i had to do was go in the terminal and typesudo dmraid -rE



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