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7

It sounds like for your purposes it's enough to simply format the drive, not overwrite it. Overwriting would be necessary if you wanted to make sure no previously saved data would be recoverable in the future. But it sounds like you don't need that. Rather, you need to format it, and perform a clean install of Ubuntu. Yes, this is totally possible. Boot ...


3

Boot up normally. When you see the desktop bakcground, press ctrl + alt + f1 You should then be at the terminal. Login. Then run these commands: rm -r ~/.config rm -r ~/.compiz rm ~/.Xauthority sudo reboot If that doesn't work, try: dconf reset -f /org/compiz/ setsid unity sudo reboot If it still doesn't work, try the answer from here: Unity ...


2

It will run fine. I would prefer xubuntu for a touch of a lighter system, but in the end the ram eaters will be the applications like Firefox, whatever system (windows, (x)ubuntu) you are running. And I would recommend 16.04 of course,since it is the current lts version.


2

To force Linux not use the swap, run sudo swapoff -a As for turning off the disk, you can do that through the included "Disks" application. See screenshot. (The option is grayed out for me as it is my system drive)


2

It's a standard SATA drive. There should be no reason you can't. Hard drives don't come encrypted out of the box.


2

For anybody curious I did solve this. First I determined that the charset on the old VFAT drive was ISO-8859-1 (very common for Windows). I then executed a rsync command with the option to convert the old charset to UTF-8 and that did the trick. Example: rsync -vaW --size-only --iconv=ISO-8859-1,utf-8 /media/Music/* '/media/username/Seagate Backup Plus ...


1

I'm trying to mount a drive with: sudo mount -t ntfs /dev/sda1 usb That is not the drive you think it is. Look: Update: the command mount responds with: [...] /dev/sda1 on / type ext4 (rw,relatime,errors=remount-ro,data=ordered) [...] /dev/sda1 is already mounted and it is your root drive which contains the main file system of your Ubuntu ...


1

I have a Seagate 1TB 5400RPM 64MB SATA 9,5MM Laptop Thin SSHD 8GB Flash, ST1000LM014 in my Samsung laptop, works perfectly and the speed up is noticeable. In theory this kind of disks should be perfectly equivalent to a normal disk at least at the basic "it works" level (it can create problems in seek optimization, but this is not in my experience). There ...


1

If you want to mount the second hard drive automatically you will have to change things at this point :D. There should be no reason to have it symbolically linked anywhere for a second hard drive. If it is mounted at /media/username/a bunch of numbers and you have that linked to a folder off the root called /SecondDrive ... you don't need to do that you ...


1

You can't install TLP and laptop-mode-tools at the same time (the tlp package conflicts with the laptop-mode-tools package to prevent parallel install). I understand you want to have the equivalent of NOLM_HD_IDLE_TIMEOUT_SECONDS=7200 # 2 hours LM_AC_HD_POWERMGMT=1 NOLM_AC_HD_POWERMGMT=1 This translates to DISK_APM_LEVEL_ON_AC="1" ...


1

That is becuase MBR disks only support a maximum of four primary partitions. Use an extended partition for Ubuntu & swap instead.


1

Most external HDD are nothing more than an internal HDD in a case with a SATA-to-USB adapter. So no need to turn off your computer, you can use your disk like any regular external HDD. To remove it safely you can use your file manager's eject option or the umount command-line tool.


1

Linux can be install on any driver or any partition. This also includes usb Pen drives as well as other usb or extended drives that are recognized at boot. The Linux install comes with a GUI that will walk you through the steps. When you boot the install disk it will give you default options, this includes installing along side Windows. Choosing that ...


1

Yes. You can shrink that 263 GB volume by following this guide. Next you can increase the space of your /home and swap using this guide.


1

You have your Windows 8.1 installed in Legacy Mode and Legacy Mode does not support more than 4 primary partitions. More on UEFI vs Legacy You already have 4 primary partitions created (namely C, E, F & system reserved). Ubuntu installer can't create a fifth primary partition to install Ubuntu on. You can do any one of the following. 1 : Delete one ...


1

As you can see the drive still in Gparted, you can go on and create a new partition table for it by starting gParted and then choose the proper device, go to the menu bar and click on Devices --> create partition table as format you can choose msdos afterwards build your partitions like you want and apply it. Hope this will work for you.


1

While you ask about dd, may I recommend partclone? It is made to clone and restore a partition. It needs to be aware of the underlying filesystem, advantage over dd is that it copies only the used blocks and saves a lot of time or space, since it is rare that the unused part of a partition is compressible (old data garbage instead of zeroes). sudo ...


1

Easier way: sudo fdisk -l as said by Videonath. Locate the partition you wish to clone dd bs=512 if=/dev/<partition-name> of=/<external-media-path> e.g.dd bs=512 if=/dev/sda2 of=/dev/sdb1 Note: dd requires the size of the target to be grater or equal to the size of the source The backup created this way (partition level) would not be ...


1

As first you need to find out data about your HDD, you can do this by typing in terminal: sudo fdisk -l You should get an output like this: Disk /dev/sda: 149,1 GiB, 160041885696 bytes, 312581808 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disklabel ...


1

Not sure if it will work for you but you can try opening terminal and typing gsku gnome-disks & or I guess if you don't have gksu you can type sudo gnome-disks & Then select the external drive and click the icon in the right top that looks like three vertical lines and choose Drive Settings You can set the standby timeouts there ... again not ...


1

I finally solved. sudo apt-get install -y ecryptfs-utils i installed this then this and it worked ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ sudo ecryptfs-recover-private INFO: Searching for encrypted private directories (this might take a while)... ^TINFO: Found [/media/ubuntu/139df09d-a0b5-4567-86c8-ebb26dd88d87/.ecryptfs/caneraydin/.Private]. Try to recover this directory? ...


1

I experienced the same problem (on a Dell XPS 13). The issue for me was that the SATA bios setting was set to raid (which Ubuntu doesn't seem to recognize?). The following link (second post/ first answer) explains how to change it to ahci: http://www.eightforums.com/drivers-hardware/53429-migrating-raid-ssd-switching-ahci.html (edit: You can ignore the ...


1

I'm not quite sure how Ubuntu would handle it, it might be able to auto-detect, BUT the amount of RAM doesn't live up the recommended amount: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/SystemRequirements


1

Had the same problem with almost the exact same hardware. The issue was with the SATA mode. It needs to be changed to AHCI mode in the BIOS settings. This can be done with the instructions found here, printed below for completeness. Run Command Prompt as Admin Invoke a Safe Mode boot with the command: bcdedit /set {current} safeboot minimal ...


1

I just got into a similar situation with a botched upgrade and subsequent messing around in recovery mode, where a certain subset of packages (namely apport) were hanging on dpkg --configure -a with that same Started Braille Device Support. message. The hack that got me through this was: If you're currently staring at a hung apt-get command, hit ctrl+c to ...



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