Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

One nice Gnome application is baobab sudo apt-get install baobab apt-cache show baobab Description-en: GNOME disk usage analyzer Disk Usage Analyzer is a graphical, menu-driven application to analyse disk usage in a GNOME environment. It can easily scan either the whole filesystem tree, or a specific user-requested directory branch (local or remote). ...


15

ncdu If you use the command line, you could use ncdu. It uses a command-line GUI (ncurses). Installation sudo apt-get install ncdu Description From its webpage: [...] ncdu: A disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface, aimed to be run on a remote server where you don't have an entire gaphical setup, but have to do with a simple SSH ...


6

Another very useful app for this is: JDiskReport Is very similar to windows SpaceSniffer and has very useful IU. You need java to use it An image to see how it works: Hope it helps !


4

Use the ducks: du -cks *|sort -rn|head -n11 This will list the top ten subdirectories and files in the current path and the space they are using, and a total. If you change the -cks to -cms it reports in MB's instead of KB's, which is probably more useful these days. You can add x to the options on du to prevent it going into other file systems, if ...


4

I'm using Greyhole and it fits almost perfectly to my use case: home server re-use of spare hdds with different brands, models, sizes all hdds space can be seen as one big mount point (like jbod) you can set different shares with different needs of redundancy (ie. Photos=max redundancy, Data=simple redundancy, Movies=zero redundancy) hdds upgrade can be ...


3

Wiping generally means to overwrite a partition/drive with other data (nulls, zeros, random) to completely destroy all data and prevent recovery. Formatting is to put a new filesystem on a partition, possibly on top of an old partition leaving the old data still recoverable but normally unseen. The Ubuntu installer should let you pick a partition to format ...


2

A standard filesystem scan is usually done with fschk. This application handles most filesystems out of the box. However, you may need to install NTFS support separately on some installations. If you'd like to do a surface scan of your drive you can use e2fsck. Use the -c option to do a bad sector scan. It should also be mentioned that nearly every Linux ...


1

Maybe the "Micca Spect media player" you mention did some formatting of the HD on it's own, I'm not sure if you were trying to use the HD with the player already. And does "The installation went well and I booted into Ubuntu (14.04 LTS with full drive and home folder encryption)" refer to anything that was done to the HD in question? I wouldn't use Disks ...


1

Try gksudo nautilus and enter your password, this will run file browser application with root access so it will have all permissions.


1

Open your terminal and type: gksudo nautilus Enter your password, Nautilus (File Browser) will open in root mode, don't close the Terminal, just minimize it. Next find your HDD left under Devices, right click it to Properties, go to Permissions tab then change it to your username and your group to fit your wanted permissions. Voila,close Nautilus and ...


1

Search for Disks in Ubuntu Dash, it does the job pretty good. Connect and unmount the HDD you want to delete, delete it (multiple places to open menu in Disks) then create a new NTFS Partition. Tick the option: Contents -> Erase -> Overwrite existing data with zeros (slow) Voila, wait couple of hours and your HDD is clean =D EDIT: I just tried to ...


1

Check the "delete on destination" checkbox in the "basic options" tab. It's like specifying the -d option in rsync which will delete files and folders that are not on the source disk.


1

Not sure if you are deleting large files, but one immediate troubleshoot would be to check your trash. Ubuntu counts the trash against the disk space, i.e. it does not auto-clear but requires you to explicitly empty it before the space taken up by deleted files is made available for use.


1

Warning This will take some time, so start this before going to bed. ;) Warning If there is a power failure during this operation you will loose all of your data, so do a full system backup before starting. Download, burn and boot the gparted live CD Shrink /dev/sda5 to 1GByte move /dev/sda6 to the left next to /dev/sda5 extend /dev/sda6 to the end of the ...


1

First off, I'd use the built-in format function in the Disk panel. However, your mistake is that you're not root. This is very easy to fix. Change your command to: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda bs=1024 Now, run it. When it asks you for your password, enter it. You will not see characters Generally, whenever you see Permission Denied, it means you ...


1

You can try formatting that unallocated space as ext4 from Ubuntu Live CD/USB using gparted. Choose "Try Ubuntu" option during installation of Ubuntu. To launch gparted, open a terminal by pressing ctrl+alt+t and typing sudo gparted.


1

I'm a little confused about which hard drive is usb and which isn't, but if it were me I'd try to install a fresh Ubuntu onto whichever HD is physically inside the new computer (not a fan of USB HD's for a system drive, not as reliable it seems). Using a Ubuntu live iso/cd/usb, and with the old USB HD not even plugged in. Then with the new Ubuntu in the new ...


1

Your hard-disk itself has a problem on one of its sectors and the hard-disk problem needs to be fixed before you try to re-use it. All that you've done until now is running file system repair tools which all assume they have a good hard drive to work with If you really suspect hard drive failure, (which is what this looks like) you should run badblocks In ...


1

Does the drive work normally on other computers or windows? Can you read & write to the entire drive? I've used external usb drive "cases" before, where you plug in a HD or cd/dvd drive, Ubuntu (Linux Mint) usually sees the HD's as /dev/sdc (for example) like a regular drive. No need for usbmount or pmount, but maybe yours is newer or weird somehow. Are ...


1

Your statement "1TB is the Master Boot Record" is not exactly the right way of looking at things. The dialog is indicating the partitioning method, not the location of the boot sector for your installation. There is an unfortunate ambiguity between these two meaning of master boot record (MBR). However, if this was in fact where your boot sector resides ...


1

Once a hard drive starts to fail , you will start to have problems. You can continue to use the drive for some time, by re-formatting it, etc as you suggest. The drive may have some life in it, for example, I used a drive like this for over a year. Just make sure you have reliable back ups. Sometimes (rarely) they fail gradually, but eventually the drive ...


1

I suspect the drives, or still more likely, the SATA control chips on the motherboard are periodically overheating and protecting themselves by timing out rather than risking damage. Ordinarily winter is not the season when I encounter overheating issues, but in this case it seems possible. If you have an accessory fan you can direct at the motherboard, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible