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For a particular package: apt-cache show <packagename> | grep -E '^(.*Size|Version|Package)' Add or remove fields in the grep string as necessary. Since multiple versions may be present, I added the Version and Package fields as well. Note that the Installed Size field is an estimated value, in KB, whereas the Size field is for the package file and ...


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I am a big fan of baobab to figure out where the big files are hidden. To install: sudo apt-get install baobab


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There's a tutorial on adding RAID to an existing installation that you can look through.


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You should install Ubuntu on a separate partition so that you won't lose any data. The most important thing is you should create a separate partition for Ubuntu manually, and you should select it while installing Ubuntu. First create a separate partition for Ubuntu while running Windows (like a partition with more than 10 GB). Also create a small ...


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Step 1) Connect the drive. Wipe the drive if desired. a) If you have data on the drive that you need to keep, back it up. b) Fill the drive with zeros which will blow away the MBR and all data by: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX **or** if you want a progress report as you wipe the drive use sudo dc3dd wipe=/dev/sdX in both cases sdX should be ...


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Linux systems don't use the "drive letter" convention that you are familiar with from Windows devices. You can easily access the file system on Ubuntu by clicking the folder icon in the Unity launcher. If there are no additional drives mounted, you will not see anything under Devices except Computer. Under Computer you should see a list of folders with ...


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Install ubuntu on windows 8 with intel smart response For anyone else having this problem this was the final step that made the installation work. I had to find the intel gui and disable the acceleration. The installation still did not recognize that I had an OS installed, but it could find my hard drive and everything worked fine after that, because I ...


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Just set the disk to dynamic and choose about 100GB, then the drive will grow as you need it to but not larger then 100GB and it will stay small and only expand as you add more applications. For example if your install size is 10GB then that will be the actual size of the disk but it will be able to grow as needed up to 100GB or whatever you set the limit ...


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I believe I found the answer to your question here: Two points: You must be using a 64-bit kernel to use a filesystem > 16TB due to page cache limitation. Version 1.41 and lower of e2fsprogs (used when formatting ext2/ext3/ext4 drives) will fail on volumes > 16TB due to software limitation. Using a newer version of e2fsprogs will help. In your case I ...


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Looks like a simple case of hardware failure to me I'm afraid. That patch to the kernel isn't running on your system because your kernel was built nearly a month ago. It would be pretty extreme for Ubuntu to pull in a kernel patch that isn't in a released kernel in any event. If I saw those messages I'd be replacing the disk.


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For your new HDD, first create partitions using gparted as per your wish. Then, access your HDD using sudo fdisk device_name. m command in fdisk will print help menu. npcompete@npcompete-desktop:~$ sudo fdisk /dev/sda The device presents a logical sector size that is smaller than the physical sector size. Aligning to a physical sector (or optimal I/O) ...


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I was interested in finding this out myself. I created a quick and dirty script for measuring spindown. It works on intervals of SECONDS from uptime, and you can specify which disk(s) and intervals to use. It logs results to ~/sleepdata.log It only uses hdparm and uptime. It probably has bugs too. DL @ ...


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I assume you are talking about physical bad blocks on a disk and not about corrupted file systems. To check the physical condition of your disk it's best to install smartmontools sudo apt-get install smartmontools This works because all modern disks log their health status using a system called S.M.A.R.T. Use the smartctrl command to read out this ...


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Did you try the firmware update v5865? http://support.wd.com/product/download.asp?groupid=2301&sid=222&lang=en


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You need to run sudo mkfs.vfat /dev/sdb1 in this case.


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With the limited Information you gave it is hard to tell. You can do the following: Start ubuntu from a liveCD or USB-stick. Open the Disk Utility (just type the name into the dash) Select your harddrive, click on the gear icon -> SMART Data and Tests. There you can see the state of the disk, Temperature and any errors and FAILS it has. You can even ...


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Boot a live usb, make sure all your partitions are unmounted, and run: sudo fsck -y /dev/sda change "sda" to your hard drive. This command will try to fix the problem(s). if it does not work, update your question with any error messages


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I'm presuming one of the drives has the data you want to save. (one of the 2TB drives). Let's say drive A has data, and drive B is blank. You'll need to create a degraded raid on drive B. start the raid on drive B and rsync all of your data over the newly created raid. Once that's done, you can add driva A to the raid, and it'll sync up and become part ...


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To simply use the drive as an extra storage space Connect the drive however you need to. Open a terminal (default CtrlAltT) and type ls /dev to figure out the name of the drive. Probably sdb. Open gparted and make sure you select that drive from the dropdown in the upper-right. Select Device->create partition table. Create on large partition and format ...


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Here is an answer which doesn't show directly asked packages info, it is covered in other answers in this thread, but though you will probably find helpful to have a list of what takes a lot of space on your file system. sudo du / -h|sort -n -r|less will show you the biggest files of your / at the top of the screen. It is generally related to looking for ...


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You can do this graphically in Synaptic. if it is not installed, Install it with the command: sudo apt install synaptic then: First ensure that you enabled the Installed Size and Download size columns (or only one if you want that one). To do this, go to Settings>Preferences and choose Columns and Fonts, then tick the columns you want to see. !Then ...


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Run these two commands: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.media-handling automount 'false' gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.media-handling automount-open 'false' Or you can try it with a udev rule: sudo nano /etc/udev/rules.d/85-no-automount.rule Paste this line SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ENV{UDISKS_AUTO}="0" and save the file. Reboot the system.



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