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7

If you run df -h you'll get the result of your HDD with a list of additional lines. The most, you should mention the lines that start with /dev/sda those are parts of your HDD as stated you can also check your layout with lsblk and there's one thing if you run sudo parted -l the results will be different from df -h and lsblk about disk capacity and also ...


6

So according to your post, nobody can tell you, on which device the partitions are located. It looks like your system is using one partition for both system and home directory, so the only interesting line is Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 219G 29G 180G 14% / So the size of this partition is 219G, 29G are used, and ...


5

The list is various directories that are mounted to different filesystems. Most of them are tmpfs filesystems, which is like a ramdisk. They only hold temporary data while the system is running and are not stored anywhere on disk. Your root directory is mounted to /dev/sda1, which is the first partition on your primary hard disk.


3

The bug you posted has "fix released" all over the page. The last release affected by it is "Hardy" so this does not apply to 14.04 LTS nor 14.10 nor 15.04. So yes this particular bug has been solved. By the way: the kernel nowadays handles the "laptop-mode" tools they are referring to. Nevertheless this will still work as a tool to check the health of ...


3

The cp way The command: sudo cp -ax /media/hdd/ /media/ssd/ copies the folder hdd, the command: sudo cp -ax /media/hdd/* /media/ssd/ copies the files and sub-folders of the folder hdd. Use: shopt -s dotglob for considering dot files. The rsync way rsync -az -H --delete --numeric-ids /media/hdd/ /media/ssd/


3

Yes. If you have physical access, then you own the computer. Full encryption is the only option to prevent that - and that includes denying you access if the key goes missing. Otherwise, you just mount the drive (or it's image) in a PC where you are root...


3

Fast Googling suggests: Windows: chkdisk -f driveletter Linux: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdb2


3

The easiest way to do this is by using Gparted from Live CD/USB as suggested above. To do this have a look at the "Copying and pasting a partition" section in the Gparted manual. To reproduce the steps given in the link: To copy a partition: Select an unmounted partition. See the section called “Selecting a Partition”. Choose: Partition → Copy. The ...


3

Nope, you don't have to create a partition for every user, instead you just have to move your old /home to your external HDD. By default /home is the place for all user files unless "root" though your user files normally will sit here. For case of permissions by default users can see other files without the ability of changing or modification, if you also ...


2

Simple: There is none ;-) Dual-Booting just means that you will on bootup (after powerbutton is prssed and BIOS showed POST messages) be NOT greeted by thw Operating System as you have two installed. Instead you will be given the option to chose which one to start (Actually you can even dual-boot without that chosing-screen but let's ignore that for a ...


2

Open a terminal and install ntfs-3g , we need ntfsfix sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g Repair the filesystem sudo ntfsfix /dev/sda4 After that, mount the partition again. Here you can find the manual for the ntfsfix command


2

Boot from a live system, plug in the new HDD via USB (or another (s)ata cable, depending on your hardware), and start a 'Terminal'. Check what is the path for your old HDD (probably /dev/sda), and the new one as well (/dev/sdb), and issue this command: sudo dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb Please remember that it will take a long time, and you will not have ...


2

Your /etc/fstab was not restored and does not contain the necessary statements to mount the partitions on your second hard drive at boot time. To do this, add the following lines to the end of your /etc/fstab: #mount /dev/sdb 1 and 2 at boot time: UUID=6A4C3AF14C3AB7A1 /media/Storage ntfs-3g defaults,noexec,windows_names,locale=en_US.utf8 0 2 ...


2

It is possible to do that. HOWEVER: If the drive is actually failing, then you will eventually lose everything you put on it. If it's just the boot sector that is bad, then it should work fine. Use 'Disks' inside Ubuntu to format it with an EXT4 filesystem (or something else if you like) and it will show up just like a thumb drive. You can also use this ...


2

I keep my /home on the SSD, but some directories under my user(s) are symbolic linked to /data disk. Like ~/Downloads, ~/Dropbox, ~/VirtualBox VM's, etc... Because then all the cache directories of the user can be accessed quickly, and the 'data'-directories can't fill up the root suddenly. For example when you create a VM in Virtual box with 64GB disk for ...


1

You will need to have both partitions mounted, for instance on /old and /new. Then use the rsync utility: rsync -aruv /old/* /new/ If the old partition is your root system, you will want not to copy over the contents of some directories. Just exclude them, such as: rsync -aruv /* /new/ --exclude=/dev/* --exclude=/proc/* --exclude=/run/* --exclude=/sys/* ...


1

Don't know what an sshd is (related to storage) ... did you mean SSD? There are 50+ different ways to do this. dd ddrescue partimage clonezilla fsarchiver gparted rsync any normal backup/recovery too So the best answer for you will depend on your skillz with any of the above commands AND how good you are in correcting the /etc/fstab after the restore to ...


1

To install Ubuntu without CD/DVD or USB pendrive, follow these steps: Download Unetbootin from here. Run Unetbootin. Now, from the drop-down menu under Type: select Hard Disk. Next select the Diskimage. Browse to the directory where you downloaded the iso file of Ubuntu. Press OK. Next when you reboot, you will get a menu in that, select Unetbootin and ...


1

GUI solution: Use the gnome-disks utility. You start it by opening the Alt+F2-HUD and entering disks. In the left sidebar you see all available physical disks. Select the one you want to modify here. In the right part of the window, you'll see some general information about the selected disk and its partition structure. When you now click on the menu ...


1

Your USB to sata dock doesn't support drives > 2 TiB. You will need to get another one or connect it via sata instead of usb.


1

By running applications from your original HDD (even if you'd be able to make it work), you'd bypass the package management (apt). Don't do that! You wouldn't receive any updates on your applications and they might be vulnerable to attacks from outside (for example, your webbrowser) or have unresolved, breaking bugs. If you don't have very limited bandwith, ...


1

Since sda1 is not in fstab, you must specify the mountpoint, e.g. mount -o barrier=0 /dev/sda1 /mnt then you will be able to find your files in /mnt.


1

Having physical access to an unencrypted hard drive definitely allows an attacker to gain access to your files. So the best way to protect your data is to use full disk encryption. If your hard drive support drive locking , you can enable that. You can read a little bit about it here: http://security.stackexchange.com/a/33419 There's also another way to ...


1

Transport: Serial, ATA8-AST, SATA 1.0a, SATA II Extensions, SATA Rev 2.5, SATA Rev 2.6 SATA Rev 2.6 = SATA II. Reading the link you posted: [...] SATA interface Suitable for SATA 2.5 So most likely it's forcing the hard disk to be seen as SATA II. To quickly verify this, unplug it, plug the hard disk directly to the SATA port on the motherboard ...


1

You need to log back into Windows and fully shut down. Often, Windows 8 and above like to go into a super deep state of hibernation, leaving their relevant NTFS partition in an unstable condition. Therefore, its advisable you follow the advice and properly shut down Windows.


1

Run in terminal sudo apt-get install exfat-fuse exfat-utils and it will work.


1

I went into 'disks', and was able to open and edit the mount options. I changed the filesystem type to 'auto' and saved. Hit 'mount' and lo and behold, it worked. I was so caught up trying to find a way to do it by the terminal, I forgot to try the obvious.


1

Try looking at CloneZilla. There is a guide to do just this Here. It runs on a live cd (Or DVD, flash drive, etc.) which is to your advantage because you don't need to be using your hard drive which is what you're cloning. Or if you just want to fix GRUB: Boot up the computer off of the 1 TB drive into ubuntu Log in Open a terminal run sudo update-grub ...


1

You say you are stuck with Windows as your OS. Does this mean you cannot boot from a Live CD? If you could boot from a GNU/Linux Live CD (such as Ubuntu), you could then check if the USB is formatted correctly (or re-format using gparted) without affecting the contents of your computer's hard drive. HTH.


1

The answer is obvious. You HDD has limited read/write speed. When it is busy with copying files, it takes more time to read files from disk. That is why applications start slower and you have slowdowns and drops when watching video. It is normal. If it is really important to watch a video while copying, you can set a higher priority to your media player, ...



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