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7

You cannot do this from within a running Ubuntu operating system. The system and the swap partition must be mounted to work at all. So you need a live media and do it from within there. Boot from the Ubuntu (DVD/USB) installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing, on Live desktop, Open GParted - the partitions are unmounted - resize. Note ...


5

The general rule is to edit Windows partitions in Windows, and Linux partitions in Linux. Although Windows-made partitions can be edited in Linux, but not the other way around. I would suggest making a live USB with Ubuntu, boot into it, and shrink the hard disk Ubuntu partition from there. You need to unmount the partition before you edit it though.


5

Ext4 file system is recommended for all Linux operating systems because has backwards compatibility with its predecessors, you can mount Ext2 and Ext3 as an Ext4 file system Ext4 reduces file fragmentation employs delayed allocation which helps with flash memory life as well as fragmentation. Good choice for SSDs and HDD BtrFS it allows for drive ...


4

Here is what you can do: Load your Ubuntu live CD. Launch Gparted. Select the Ubuntu partition (it will be having ext4 File system). Shrink/Resize it. You will have unallocated space now. Push this unallocated space such that, it is right adjacent to Windows partition. In Windows, launch your partition manager and merge the Unallocated volume with Windows. ...


3

There are tons of reasons to have an "eject" button on an internal hard disk: On laptops: to save power: if you have both an SSD and a HDD, you can turn off the (power hungry) HDD On servers: to remove the drive while keeping the rest of the server running On desktops: to power down a backup HDD prior to removing it ...


3

You can use gnome-disks. (This is the Disks application in the Unity dash). You can see all information on you hard drive, do benchmarks and see SMART attributs.


3

You should be able to use Gparted to resize your Ubuntu partition to fill up the free space. If Gparted isn't installed, open a terminal (Ctrl+Alt+Del) and run sudo apt-get install gparted. Open Gparted by searching for it in Dash (~Start Menu). Select your Ubuntu partition and move your cursor to the edge of it next to the free space. You should be able ...


2

It shows as less because hard drive *manufacturers usually measure size in steps of 1,000. (1 kilobyte = 1,000 bytes, 1 megabyte = 1,000 kilobytes. 1 gigabyte = 1,000 megabytes.) So, according to these manufacturers, a 500GB drive would be 500,000,000 bytes. However, operating systems (with the exception of Mac OS) measure storage in steps of 2¹⁰ (1024), ...


2

Just a small addition to previous answer : If you started on a command line machine, or a headless system (like a rpi for example), device will probably not mount automatically. You then should first search for his device name (sudo fdisk -l) and then mount it in an empty folder (sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /media/myNewlyCreatedFolder)


2

The topic that you're looking for is mounting . In the file manager you just click on the button to open it or detach the drive, but behind the scenes it uses udisksctl . Big advantage of this command is that it mounts as your user, and you don't have to specify whole lot of options, unlike the classic mount command. For instance, to mount your usb drive, ...


2

If you are fine with adding another Virtual Hard Disk to the VM, then do this. Right click on the VM and go into Settings > Storage Inside Storage, Go into Storage Tree and click on the Hard Disk Icon next to 'Controller : SATA' Choose 'Create new disk' and Set the name, File Size and everything else to suit your needs. After that is done, Click on ...


2

I have linked to a possible duplicate question above but for your specific example you could try the following on the Host computer: VBoxManage modifyhd seerverubuntu.vdi --resize 30000 which would make it approximately 30GB. Note that the new size must be in MB, there is a nice converter here: Convert GB to MB - Conversion of Measurement Units You then ...


2

I would rather choose the manual partitioning, then choose the Ubuntu hard disk. The bootloader will be installed on the disk where you decide to install Ubuntu, which should be the 1st boot device in the bios (or uefi). Grub will let you choose between linux and windows. As David pointed out, please have a look at How to use manual partitioning during ...


2

I would use gnome-disk-utility formating the drive, not the partition. Next, (if it is the case) in Windows format in NTFS using Disk Managment. For the (so many) folder/files copying, grsync is a better choice than simple copy-paste. Pay attention at the Source and Destination "?" pop-up! Do a sync simulation first


2

I had the same trouble with an NVMe disk. That technology is quite recent and the old version of GParted in Ubuntu repo couldn't see my SSD. I resolved creating a GParted live USB with the latest version of the software.


2

Boot your Ubuntu live system and connect the external HDD where you want to save the image. You do not need to (or should not?) mount the Windows HDD. Open gnome-disks by searching for it in the Dash's application lens (Super+A), entering it into the HUD (Alt+F2) or launching it from a terminal window (Ctrl+Alt+T). When the window below opens, select your ...


2

Each disk can have its own mount point or you can use Logical Volume Management (LVM). I have a configuration with SSD and HDD (but for desktop). Main system is on SSD, and /home is on HDD. This configuration works generally fine but I think that it wastes my SSD performance.


2

G'day Ty, This doesn't sound like something you'd need a script for, unless you were intending on repeating the action multiple times (say, more than twice). Anything less would just be creating more work and possible points of failure. To write a script would require more in-depth knowledge of exactly how your computer and drives are set up, or would ...


2

Boot from your installation media, use the 'try Ubuntu now' option & check it runs on your PC OK. Then re-try with the install option from the desktop. If it doesn't come up on the 'try it now' option then ask another question - unless you can find an existing answer to whatever does happen...


1

Since it does not work on either computer, either the drive is dead, the enclosure is dead, or the enclosure is not getting enough power. Try taking the drive out of the enclosure and testing it, and also try putting the drive in a different enclosure. You could also try a different power supply for the enclosure.


1

I had a similar problem, years ago, my solution was easy, the drive was not fully inserted into the adapter. The drive loose, because the manufacturer "forgot" to use the screw that should hold have the drive in place. Simply moving the drive knocked it loose enough that while the system, with errors, saw the drive it was unable to read or ...


1

It appears that your Windows installation is in EFI mode and your Ubuntu installation is (probably) in BIOS mode. This is a recipe for headaches. There are numerous possible solutions. The two easiest are likely to be: Disable the Compatibility Support Module (CSM) in the firmware, boot an Ubuntu emergency disk, and run Boot Repair on the computer. This ...


1

I did a bit of research, from what I can tell, there are not really any benefits. My system seems to be drawing only ~10 W anyway, most of it from the network card. Cycling the drive can actually wear it out more quickly. I suppose if you are running actual server hardware with a vast number of drives, then it is actually worthwhile.


1

To manipulate you HDD and other devices, use GParted (I do not recommend you to use KDE Disk manager, it is said to be buggy): Type on terminal : apt-get install gparted There you can use GParted from Settings->GParted. To monitor and control SMART data on hard disks, use GSmartControl: Type on terminal : apt-get install gsmartcontrol To monitor ...


1

The command you need is called badblocks. To check: sudo badblocks -v /dev/sde1 This is just to view them and is harmless to execute. Use sudo dumpe2fs to find out the blocksize. Probably "4096" And to mark them: sudo badblocks -c 4096 /dev/sde1 > /home/$USER/badblocks.txt sudo fsck -l /home/$USER/badblocks.txt /dev/sde1 1st command creates a ...


1

Partitioning a disk does not increase speed. You benefit the most from a SSD if you put your "/" and /boot (if you want a separate partition for it onto the SSD. Booting my system from SSD takes about 7 to 10 seconds. If I was you I would use the SSD for "/" and /home as a separate partition. But I would also not use /home for your personal data and change ...


1

Ubuntu's default (and recommended) filesystem is ext4. I always recommend to make the following partitioning scheme for the OS as follows: One ext4 partition (with at least 20 GB) to be the root (/) partition. Even though it's possible to make separate partitions for /home, /boot, /var and actually any subdirectory inside the root partition, don't do ...


1

Yes, it looks like the disk has got corrupt. If it was working before it may be possible to recover it, and possibly as @psusi suggests, running testdisk might do the job. sudo apt-get install testdisk then sudo testdisk /dev/sdc1 I don't have a broken disk to test it on, and I don't know what it does to your, but it advertises itself as ...


1

USB media are normally mounted at /media go there in your terminal with cd /media && ls now you should see all storage mounted in that directory. If your device is in the list use cd to change in that directory and use ls or ll to list the files in your hdd. If the hdd is not listed open your file Browser and usectrl+ l to go in the adress bar. ...


1

You have a (corrupted) Windows NTFS partition. By being closed source, Microsoft Windows makes it difficult to impossible for Linux to repair its secret disk structure. Like the error message says In the first case run chkdsk /f on Windows then reboot into Windows twice. Windows MIGHT be able to fix the disk. Ask how to boot Windows from some alternate ...



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