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13

First, note there is a typo in mount your command. It should be: $ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/username Here /dev/sda2 is the device (in this case, a hard drive's partition) you want to access, and /media/username is your mountpoint, i.e., the location in the filesystem where you want to mount the device. To answer your questions: Yes, using cd is the ...


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If the two drives have the same size, cloning the source drive to the target drive using dd will have the exact same impact a full write of the target disk would have. Before even starting to consider whether this is a problem or not, if you need everything you have already on the old drive and this is "full enough", there shouldn't even be more ...


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It's probably a hardware problem, not a software problem, and the two problems in your question are probably related. When a computer fan gets old it wears out and the fan blades aren't mounted snugly on the bearings. This causes the fan to make noise and friction causes the fan to slow down, sometimes to less than half of its normal operating speed. The ...


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Check out Clonezilla here, I've used it to clone Windows+Ubuntu installs on a single disk before. It even offers to attempt clone the bootloader as well. Assuming secure boot is off it should work fairly well for you.


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I would not recommend dd for this task. It will copy sector by sector, raw disk data; so it will work only if the partitions are exactly the same size and layout (leading to corruption otherwise). And then you have again another almost-full partion, that you have to extend... messy. And if the source filesystem is almost full, it's probably quite fragmented, ...


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Whenever you mount an external disk, a trash-* directory will be created in the "root" directory where files are moved to if deleted from the GUI, like the trash on your desktop. This is to improve file recovery for external drives. (E.g. USB sticks or HDDs)


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This is the place of your trash folder. Files that you delete with Del in your file manager are stored there. You can bypass the trash by using Shift+Del. ~/.local/share/Trash/* eg: $ ls -l ~/.local/share/Trash/ total 436 drwx------ 6 aboettger aboettger 20480 Apr 29 13:56 expunged drwx------ 2 aboettger aboettger 184320 Mai 6 10:05 files drwx------ ...


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Found the problem!! Out of the total 100GB partition I made, I used 2GB swap area and made another root partition for the rest of the space for Ext4. My problem was, at the drop down, to install the linux loader, I kept checking the sdb which is my HDD. But my windows 8 loader was on my sda. Even though you want to put linux on a different hard drive than ...


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There is a good chance to move all the data using LVM tools. There is short info on how to do it: Get USB connector for your SSD disk and attach it to your laptop with SSD connected Repartition your devices same way as your current disk (actually doesn't matter how, but your new LUSK partition should be same or bigger than your current LUKS partition Copy ...


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I've had this issue on 4 occasions, since having several laptops since 2007. It didn't matter what brand(Toshiba, HP, Dell, ASUS) Everything you're talking about is plausible. My situation was resolved in the following way. As much as I have taken on board ALL the comments that OTHER people have also suggested, realistically all the 4 occasions were ...


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You wrote: So I took one of my external HDDs (total of 360G capacity with about 100G remaining) and issued the command to let it be used as a SWAP space. The antecedent of "it" is unclear, and the answer to your question depends on that detail: "It" = 100GiB Free Space If "it" refers to the 100GiB of free space you mention, then the appropriate ...


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Another possibility is that it is a software issue. I had the same thing on my laptop. When it happened, I opened "System Monitor" and saw that one process was using 2GB ram and 100% of one core. What can I do to diagnose this? When it happens again, open the system monitor and check if some process is using a lot of ram or cpu. If this is the case, it is ...


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If you used dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb (orsdc or sdd or ...) and our internal HDD was larger then the amount of data stored on your external drive, you've lost everything on the external hard drive. (Depending on the size of the internal HDD and the amount of data that the external HDD contained, your chances of recovery vary from 0% to an unknown %...) ...


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If no computer can read the disk and it is an external USB drive then we have two potential problems (it can be both): If it is simply an external desktop drive the actual internal hard drive on the USB hard drive may fine but the USB interface is broken. You'd have to break open the hard drive enclosure and pull out the drive to then hook it up like a ...


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you can either use some tools like clonezilla , redo backup or you can use command line tools such the command dd dd if=/dev/sdXX of=/dev/sdXX bs=4096 check this for how to dd or the command rsync rsync -av /mount-point-of-first-drive /mount-point-of-second-drive based on @Rman, for your case it's better to use rsync. Else if you want to use dd you ...



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