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11

According to smart status ... Hard drives, supporting this attribute Samsung, Seagate, IBM (Hitachi), Fujitsu, Maxtor, Western Digital, Hewlett-Packard and End-to-End error S.M.A.R.T. parameter is a part of HP's SMART IV technology and it means that after transferring through the cache RAM data buffer, the parity data between the host and the ...


8

The end-to-end-eror is a critical attribute. Bad values here are an indicator for very soon complete disk failure. Back up all data as soon as possible and get a new disk! More information can be found on Wikipedia, here's an excerpt: ID: 184 Hex: 0xB8 Attribute name: End-to-End error / IOEDC Better: ...


7

According to the description of the failing parameter, DATA IS BEING CORRUPTED when it goes through the drive's cache. So if you plan to do ANYTHING with that disk, the first thing to do is disable that cache. Concretely: if you plan to even extract the data, first use hdparm (for example) to disable the cache. MAYBE that will allow you to extract non-...


3

You are trying to resize a mounted partition which is not possible. You will have to boot from an Ubuntu Live USB to resize that partition since you cant unmount it. Follow the instructions here to make the Live USB. then boot up your laptop from this Live USB and use gparted to resize the partition.


3

When a machine goes into the suspend state the kernel freezes (stops) user space programs and kernel threads. Then the kernel will traverse all the devices and calls the suspend methods on each driver. Each driver has the know-how to put the hardware into a deep sleep state (or even power it off) (and the converse to bring it back to a sane running state ...


3

You're missing the -f option. It also looks like vdfuse needs to be told what the type of file it is. The command should be: vdfuse -r -t VHD -f "/media/mike/DATA/VM-VHD/SGOS.vhd" ~/Test The -f specifies the file that you're mounting. The -t means what type, since you're using VHD, that is what is specified. Also make sure that you uncomment the line ...


2

That is SMART data that is used for drive self-diagnosis. You can find good explanation on how to interpret it here (take a look at the other answers too): Value: This is the raw value that the controller reports. Usually it's an easy to understand value (like power on hours or temperature), but sometimes it isn't (like the read error rate). Different ...


2

If you are looking for grub loader, please enter the following command in ubuntu- sudo update-grub After executing the above commands, reboot and check if the grub loader appears. I had faced similar issue where I did not get the option to install ubuntu alongside windows and Ubuntu was loaded automatically. After executing the above mentioned command, I ...


2

You can try to force a check of all file systems skipping mounted ones with the -M option sudo fsck -Af -M If it fails perhaps you can try for ext4 filesystems sudo fsck.ext4 -f /dev/sda1 > fsck-output.txt You can change to ext3 depending on your filesystem type. The Recommended filesystem for Linux systems would be EXT4 with TRIM intended to ...


2

Baobab is useful - gives you a nice ring chart showing what's taking up your space, 1/2 a 1.8T drive should be pretty obvious! It isn't installed by default - it's Gnome so you may find it comes with clutter, and you'd need to install it - so perhaps use a USB drive to do this? Once you've located the rogue file(s), then deleting becomes trivial - but it is ...


2

What I see in the output of lsblk and df The two key points are these two lines: ├─sdd1 8:49 0 457.9G 0 part / └─sdd5 8:53 0 7.9G 0 part [SWAP] / tells us that 457.9 G disk partition contains your currently used Ubuntu - / designates root folder, much like C:\ on Windows. [SWAP] tells us it's the partition for your virtual memory ( which is ...


2

So which directories are save to put on the SSD? Any directory you want on it. I would advice the whole system and store your private data on a partition on the HDD. Can I move /home to SSD? Yes. I myself only put the directories in /home/$USER/ onto a partition. Since those directories are maintained from a config file (~/.config/user-dirs.dirs) I ...


2

You can change their standard location by changing the file ~/.config/user-dirs.dirs which usually looks something like this: # This file is written by xdg-user-dirs-update # If you want to change or add directories, just edit the line you're # interested in. All local changes will be retained on the next run # Format is XDG_xxx_DIR="$HOME/yyy", where yyy ...


2

Just keep your Lubuntu installation and add the KDE packages. No need for a second installation or anything else. Be aware - all those thousand Ubuntu-distributions basically use just different default packages - thats all. Therefor if you want another desktop environment, install the related packages and that's it. The following command should be enough ...


2

Is it possible that shutting down and then unplugging my external hard drive could have broken a path? No. And if it did it would not kill the contents of the disk. I have noticed that Ubuntu shuts down almost instantly ... We do not probe for an update as Windows does. whereas Windows takes much longer and often pauses on closing 1 application ...


2

On the left of the screen, near the top, there should be an icon that looks like a file cabinet. Click it. It might flash for a bit, then a window should open. Near the left of this window, there should be a "Devices" label. Under it, you should see your hard drive partitions (a partition is basically a section of your hard drive). If there's more than one, ...


1

All you should need to do is install a 32-bit version of Ubuntu to the SSD using your other computer; after that, once the drive is transferred to the neighbor's laptop, chances are good it will detect and adjust to the new hardware without problems. Connect the SSD to your computer via USB cable, then boot your computer into a 32-bit live Ubuntu DVD or USB ...


1

In your situation there is two ways to recover your files if they still exist, First from ubuntu: you need to open ubuntu than open the terminal and run this script. sudo fdisk -l (it will list all the partitions on your hard disk) sudo mount /dev/sda(partition number) /mnt (where you will find your files) if you want to unmount the partition simply ...


1

you can mount the partitions and get your data simply by typing : sudo fdisk -l (it will list all the partitions on your hard disk) sudo mount /dev/sda(disk number) /mnt(where you will find all your data) you can create different directorys if you have many partitions for exp: mkdir ~/sda(partition number) then you type : sudo mount /dev/sda(...


1

my hard disk had around 500GB memory, not 1800GB I am not sure where you got those numbers from, but the size of your hard drive is 750 GB. what can I do to save at least the most important data (~200MB)? You probably just need to recover the partition table. Most likely, the file system is not corrupted and you only have to tell the system how to ...


1

The message about the kernel using the old table, appears because you are trying to modify partitions on a disk that's in use by the system. Either boot from a LiveCD and make the changes you want on your disk or, as Rinzwind said, do a clean install. If this disk is not your system disk, you can also unmount it before you start making this kind of changes....


1

It is asking where your Ubuntu ISO is. If you have not downloaded it: 32-bit Ubuntu 16.04: http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04/ubuntu-16.04-desktop-i386.iso 64-bit Ubuntu 16.04: http://releases.ubuntu.com/16.04/ubuntu-16.04-desktop-amd64.iso Then select the file. :)


1

During installation you will be asked where you want to install Ubuntu. You can choose the SSH drive and specify that you want the whole drive to be used. A bit will be set apart for swapping though. After the installation, the HDD will automatically be mounted in /media/{some long drive id}. If you want to change the HDD mount point to something easier to ...


1

In ubuntu (and in linux in general) Computer or MyComputer is a Windows-like designation for /. / is the root of your Ubuntu filesystem. Just like MyComputer is the root of your Windows PC. In linux everything is interpreted as a file or folder, even the hardware parts. Hardware is located in /dev. Harddisks looks like /dev/sda , dev/sdb , etc. 67GB ...


1

To activate the snapshots, try adding "-K/--ignoreactivationskip" Someone decided the default for snapshots on thin volumes is for setactivationskip to be 'yes'. You can disable the skipping permanently by running "lvchange --setactivationskip n" on each new snapshot.


1

I encountered this issue when I tried upgrading 15.10 to 16.04 and I fixed using below steps. Boot in command line by pressing E when highlight the first entry to edit it. Cursor to the end of the linux line. Remove quiet splash vt.handoff=7 and add single. Press Ctrl+X to boot. Run screen (in order to get more than one prompt). Press Ctrl+A and then C to ...


1

Unless you need to destroy the data on the hard disk (to make it irrecoverable by data recovery software), you don't need to secure erase; simply formatting the drive should be adequate. That said, when you type the command, be sure to replace the entire <password> phrase, including < and > characters. For example, if you want the password to be ...


1

There are a few ways to achieve this. I installed Ubuntu Mate on a 1TB HDD, with Windows 10 on an SSD. I put the GRUB2 loader on the HDD, and therefore I have to use F11, and choose to boot from the HDD at startup, whenever I want to boot Ubuntu. If you dislike this way, and want to continue booting from your SSD, but still be able to choose between OSes at ...


1

This approach are fine. I suggest you also consider these issues: SSD technology and IO wearing Depending on technology of your SSD, you have also to pay attention on IO rate of some applications. High IO could decrease the life of some devices. If was the case, these files would be better linked to HDD. I believe this approach is not only for the /home ...


1

The simple answer is that you are running an OS on the USB bus, and that is the slowest bus on your system. (FYI when I say bus, I am not making an analogy to a people bus) Your computer is designed to give a faster bus to the hard drive system, the USB bus is for peripherals, so it has less priority. Unless the machine was designed to run from USB, then ...



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