Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

What you have is a free fall sensor, (accelerometer) whether it is failing, or giving erroneous data, I'm not sure. I recomend you black list the free fall sensor, and depending on how critical your hard disk drive space is, delete or clear the syslog file as well. sudo > /var/adm/sylog I am suspicious that there is another issue as well, that logs ...


2

dd is "block copy" program, not formatter. Try using sudo fdisk /dev/sdb and create single primary partition with n command (then p and accept suggested values). Don't forget to write changes with w before quitting with q. This way fsck will create new Master Boot Record on that disk. Then comes actual format process of your choice (initiating ...


2

Open terminal Ctrl+Alt+T and type udisksctl status. This will tell you the hardrive model


2

You can use lshw. Install it by running sudo apt-get install lshw from Terminal (Ctl+Alt+T), if not installed already. Then from Terminal you can run: $ sudo lshw -C disk *-disk description: ATA Disk product: ST9500325AS vendor: Seagate physical id: 0.0.0 bus info: scsi@0:0.0.0 logical name: ...


2

Change /mnt/data owner and group to yourself like this: sudo chown basement21.basement21 /mnt/data And allow only you to read and write, and your personal group to only read: sudo chmod 750 /mnt/data


2

Sorry for posting this as an answer, but the comments are too small to say what I need to say... :( You had a GPT on your /sda and a MBR on your /sdb... It's not a huge problem, but is the origin of your original problem: effectively, the UEFI boot partitions on the other computers in your lab didn't know about the Ubuntu boot loader as they are missing ...


2

Read error rate is an index whose value it's meaningful only if interpreted based on a manufacturer's guideline, since there's no standard way to implement it. Conversely, the Reallocated sector count index is very alarming: 3736544 sectors * 512B = 1913110528B = 1.91GB~, and this means that almost 2GB worth of sectors are gone already. So, to answer your ...


1

Just install Ubuntu as you normally would and install all updates, but stay away from proprietary software! That way, it'll just boot when you move the HDs as contrarily to Windows, there are no drivers just modules and these are are built into the kernel, so all hardware supported by the kernel will just work out of the box! Once the hard drive is in the ...


1

I assume "everything to my HDD" refers to data stored in your /home directory? When you installed Ubuntu it creates a / root directory - where all your data is stored in sub-folders which can be mounted onto the HDD. You also have a swap partition, I recommend putting /home directory on your HDD, but you may have to use a live disk of Ubuntu as the drive ...


1

First boot to Windows (as you seem to have a dual boot system) and: chkdsk /f X: where X is the drive letter of the FAT partition. then mount with: sudo mount /dev/sda1 /media/external (no options) and that should fix it...


1

If you use the nofail option in /etc/fstab, the system will look for your disk (and partition) on boot time. If the device is plugged, the filesystem will be mounted. If not, the boot will continue as normal. See arch wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fstab Example UUID=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX /myusbhdd ntfs nofail,auto,noatime,rw,user 0 0 ...


1

To determine whether the problem is the drive or the enclosure, remove the drive from the enclosure, install it in a desktop with sufficient power and check the smart status. For a deeper test, you can check every sector of the drive utilizing tools like ddrescue. ddrescue will report error size during the process and you can attempt data recovery at the ...


1

Well, I did some research to find out that my conception was wrong; and I do have an answer. The Linux/Ubuntu /dev/ folder contains a list of device IO interfaces, not so much files. Here's a link to where I discovered this. So, instead of reading a file, and dumping it to a file, I was reading an output stream, and dumping it to a file. Of course, output ...


1

I am aware that hdd manufacturers write firmware on the hdd platters (it has been done like this since more modern drives have firmware requirements that outstrip the embedded controller storage availability). I don't know if the firmware hides itself from you by offsetting addresses, and whether dd would be able to ignore or bypass such an offset, but if ...


1

To achieve the desire result as you indicated: Call your system to recognize /dev/sdb to belong to you: sudo adduser secretdrive sudo chown secretdrive:secretdrive /dev/sdb sudo adduser [your-username] secretdrive sudo chmod 770 /dev/sdb Explanation: assign a new system name to your drive: /dev/sdb chown-ize your drive to the system username of ...


1

The solution below assumes your friend is not an expert, trying to hack your computer to find a way to look into your data. It is however a reasonable threshold, to prevent unintended access (mounting) to a specific partition or drive. An option, that also can be used as a more temporary solution on any user account is the following: Add the following ...


1

I see a problem with your commands: /dev/sdg1 in the 1st error. /dev/sdf in the 2nd error. g-io-error-quark, 19 means "Method name you invoked isn’t known by the object you invoked it on." So I would assume your 1st command has an invalid device and it should be /dev/sdf1. Regarding the superblock error: start here and read the link in post 2 So how ...


1

Your partitioning idea is good 18 GB for / , 2 GB for swap in SSD and 200 GB for /home. You can make a partition for user apps as much as you wish (say 100 GB) and mount it at /usr. This custom partition scheme can be done by choosing "Something else" in Installation Type


1

Go to the Dash and search for "Disks". You should see one application with that exact name. Open it to get the info you need.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible