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11

In general, they should leave each other alone. If you do the install correctly (Windows first, then Linux, as a rule, because Linux is more 'considerate'). As far as I am aware, there is no additional risk involved in sharing a drive. Having said that, here are some gotchas to watch out for. 1) Windows will not be able to see the contents of your Linux ...


10

Short answer: It doesn't matter at all. Detailed answer: There is absolutely no risk with keeping two operating systems on the same disk device. You can mess with another system partition as long as the disk device with that partition is accesible, putting it on separate physical device doesn't make it safer (nor less safe) in any way.


9

It is safer to use 2 hard disks. during formatting it is easier to recognize the different hard disks. 1 will be named sda and the other sdb. Though the installer puts names next to bootable partitions it does help to find other partitions that belong to that specific OS (like a D: drive will be sda2 on sda where sda1 is the OS for Windows or db2 is a ...


3

Go to a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T type: sudo apt-get install gksudo gksudo gedit /etc/fstab put a # in front of the line that has mnt/5dae46e774ac431f in it type sudo mount -a If you get no errors, you will not get any at the next reboot neither.


2

Try this: Launch parted as superuser: in a terminal: sudo parted /dev/sdd (you will be prompted for your sudo password) Create a new partition table: in parted: mklabel gpt Exit: in parted: q And see if now gparted is able to handle the device


2

From a strict system point of view, it is exactly the same ... provided you correctly configure your partitions. Correctly configured partitions are perfectly safe to use and you will never inadvertantly erase date in one partition while working on another one - be they under same OS or not. If you configure them by hand hacking the Master Boot Record with ...


1

It would statistically be less safe to install onto two separate drives. If one drive fails you lose half of your data. Conversely, installing both OSs to one drive and keeping the (hypothetical?) second drive as a backup drive would give you a form of redundancy should one drive fail. As far as your system is concerned, it doesn't matter if you partition ...


1

If you have two hard drives, then installing Windows on one and Ubuntu (or any other OS) on the other is the most convenient. most modern Windows PC's come with three partitions already installed - a recovery partition, the "System Reserved" partition, and finally your primary Windows partition. If only 3 Primary partitions are defined, create an extended ...


1

You have (at least) one bad block (LBA 5642528) that's causing repeated errors. You can try to: 1: backup your entire hard disk 2: reformat/repartition your disk using the LONG method to try and make it map out the bad block(s). This could take many hours to complete. 3: restore your hard disk or 1: replace the hard disk Cheers, Al


1

To boot your external hard drive, you can set it as first hard drive in BIOS, or try hitting F12, (or similar), when booting, to get an option to boot it. Once it is running you can access the internal drive using Files, (the file manager like app).


1

To my knowledge, there are no files in Ubuntu which store or are dependent on the physical characteristics of the hard drive. All the information about the partitions is stored in the MBR and other data structures, which are outside of any filesystems (doing otherwise would create a chicken-and-egg problem, right? :)). The only file which comes to mind is ...


1

Yes. According to their site, Ubuntu with a GUI only requires 5GB of Hard Disk storage, although any other programs you may install will be above and beyond this total.


1

Yes, hybrid drives work by storing pretty much all of the data on the magnetic disk while using the SSD portion to cache commonly used data so you can access it much quicker than if you were to get it directly from the magnetic disk. On most hybrid drives this is done by the firmware on disk at a base level and doesn't involve the OS or drivers in any way at ...



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