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another eclipse OSS client for windows, mac and linux: http://membrane-soa.org/downloads/soap-client.htm


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It expects an X server to run with. You can't run that headless. I guess you want to edit something on gui. You can do this over FTP/Samba/SCP, edit on your PC and transfer it back to the server.


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salam You can always create a bash script and change your language before running poedit or any program for that matter. for example if poedit runs with command /usr/bin/poedit, you can create a script file with these lines: #!/bin/sh export LANG=en_US.UTF-8 exec /usr/bin/poedit $@


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There are different Terminal emulators (the windows) and different shells (the thing that does the work) and they can be configured or changed. Maybe you'll like the Zsh-shell more than the Bash which is default. Terminal are made for Text In- and output. i don't think there is a need of a GUI. There are GUI-applications, which can be used as alternative to ...


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You can either select the Ubuntu GUI on login or uninstall Unity 8 as described here


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1)Click on the power icon in the upper right corner 2)Click on system settings 3)Lock it to your launcher The other application is there for future convergence plans(it will be improved in the future).


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This depends largely on how you are managing your data, and what you mean by GUI. If you use a database and you are working with that in a GUI and the GUI crashes (which honestly, I wouldn't worry too much about) then whatever has been updated/changed in your database will be found in the same state as you left it at the moment of said crash. However, as ...


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Only if there is volatile data relevant to an application that would ultimately fail as a result of your GUI failing, but mainly no. AKA if your GUI fails and a text editor is open and the text editor dies after the GUID dies Then you lose whatever was unsaved in the text editor. Basically no.


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Just backup. No, your data should not be affected by GUI crashes, but if you really want to be safe, backup, backup, backup.


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"Ubuntu 15.04 seems to have an issue with nvidia drivers." This is a common problem... First, lets get Ubuntu to a 'clean' state, without any nvidia drivers installed: sudo apt-get purge $(dpkg -l | awk '$2~/nvidia/ {print $2}') Next, let's remove the x-server error - follow this guide. Now, we'll try to set up the Nvidia GT 630 drivers: sudo apt-get ...


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Either you have changed your desktop file /usr/share/applications/xdiagnose.desktop or you have an additionally desktop file in ~/.local/share/applications The originally content looks like this. Note the line Exec= [Desktop Entry] Name=xdiagnose GenericName=Diagnose Graphics Issues Comment=X.org Diagnostic and Repair Utility Exec=pkexec xdiagnose ...


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If you are using Emacs (Which is fantastic), then you would find magit a super brilliant option :D


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There's also an extension for Nautilus called nautilus-hide that will allow you to hide any file or folder with a simple right-click on them. To install this extension : sudo apt-get install nautilus-hide in a terminal, or search for "nautilus hide" in the Ubuntu Software Center. Don't forget to quit Nautilus after installation : Alt+F2 and type nautilus ...


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1st off: if you want to hide a file from anyone: install a linux intrusion detection system. (Snort is an example) You can even hide a file from "root" but "root" will also be able to revert those setting. But it might be easier to just set the permissions of the directory that holds the file to "root". Example: $ sudo su # mkdir tmp/ # touch tmp/1 ...


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The part behind Activities is called Activities Overview The panel at the top of the screen is called Top Bar or Top Panel The area at the bottom of the screen (visible only, if you move your mouse at the bottom of the screen in GNOME 3.14) is called Notification Area. GNOME 3.16 has an overlay, which will be activated, if you click the small handler at the ...


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Not any more… It's pretty much all command-line stuff nowadays as per the official Ubuntu customisation documentation… Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news…


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Open a text-only console by using the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt+F1. At the login: prompt type your username and press Enter. At the Password: prompt type your user password and press Enter. Now you are logged in to a text-only console, and you can run terminal commands from the console. Run the following command to show the login screen: sudo service ...



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