Hot answers tagged

4

It is not possible to do this from a graphical user interface, you have to do it from command line. You can install the Ubuntu server edition and install a desktop environment on that afterwards. But this is not recommended for users without some more advanced knowledge how to do it ... It is much easier to install the Ubuntu desktop edition and remove the ...


3

I had the same issue, my setup is Ubuntu 14.04 and Cinnamon 2.8.6 Here is how I solved it: Install dconf-tools. Run in a terminal window: sudo apt-get install dconf-tools Open dconf-editor: dconf-editor Go to org > cinnamon > desktop > session Change session-manager-uses-logind to TRUE (checked) Logout and login Now you'll have different ...


1

"behind-the-scenes uses CLI tools" is not a valid concept. Just adding a layer of interpretation between the user and the system calls adds no security. Any X Windows program respects its $DISPLAY environment variable. You can set up a tunnel for the X protocol FROM the X client on the server TO the X server on your remote management system (man ssh), and ...


1

OK I found how to do it! WARNING: Doing this will hide the GUI input for the passphrase at the startup splash screen and also the messages "please enter passphrase...", etc. sudo nano /lib/plymouth/themes/ubuntu-logo/ubuntu-logo.script go around line 614 find this lines and comment them Plymouth.SetDisplayPasswordFunction (display_password_callback); ...


1

As taken from SuperUser.com, The process is a little complex to explain here since it is different for every shell you use. Rather I'll give you two links: How to Change the Title of an xterm (Comprehensive instructions for many different shells) Show the current Command in your Bash window Title. A nice step by step procedure on how the author went on ...


1

The title can be set using escape sequences as shown in How to change xterm title. ( Specifically for bash ). In their example, they use case statement that sets PS1 with an enclosed escape sequence. case $TERM in xterm*) PS1="\[\033]0;\u@\h: \w\007\]bash\\$ " ;; *) PS1="bash\\$ " ;; esac The basic idea is to ...


1

You could install and use xttitle (Note the doubled t in the name). I use it like this in a file sourced by my ~/.bashrc: # from the "xttitle(1)" man page - put info in window title update_title() { [ $TERM = xterm -o $TERM = xterm-color ] && xttitle "[$$] ${USER}@${HOSTNAME}:$PWD" } cd() { [ -z "$*" ] && builtin cd $HOME [ -n ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible