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Alright, I as well was dual booting and I thought well hey what could go wrong upgrading to windows 10. Well I'm not tech savvy in this department and need help. What worked and were you able to use windows 10? Please let me know.


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Installing windows (or upgrading it) alongside linux can be problematic. Try this: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair I used it to fix a problem after I installed the Windows 10 tech preview, and it worked. Basically, what it does is reinstall grub to work with all currently installed operating systems. Make sure to tell it to install grub to ...


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Boot-Repair allows to easily do the EFI renaming via the "Rename Windows EFI files" option, but that option is not enabled by default because it's a dirty hack and it is not reliable in all situations. Instead, it is safer to change the UEFI boot order, when possible, or have bcd call grub, which is what Boot-Repair suggests (see the 4 last lines of your ...


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If you have installed the server version then this is expected. Although if you have not installed the server version then also this can happen. Your OS is unable to continue up to the six init levels required for normal startup. It is seemingly stuck at the first init run level which happens when something is broken.I suggest that instead of trying to ...


1

Nothing will show up as you type your password, this is an intentional security feature! Make sure you type the password correctly, remember that Ubuntu is case-sensitive!


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I never found a solution to this, I have ATI/AMD dual graphics, and have the same issues, xserver breaks after installing proprietary drivers from repositories, as well as from the ATI/AMD website.I even attempted updating to kernel 4.1, but to no avail. My only solution has been to downgrade to Ubuntu 14.04.


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Can't believe: exactly the old dirty hack with manual renaming of EFI-files works. I wonder why Boot Repair didn't manage this.


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you could try this: boot from a ubuntu installation live usb and then run boot-repair again and use this custom repair and it might work fine this way.


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I read something about drives not being detected. They said you need to switch your sata cable on your motherboard to a different spot. I know that you don't have a sata cable.So maybe try to move your hard drive in a different spot. Like if you plugged the hard drive in the front move it to the back. Switch it around.Try to have the hardrive in the back ...


2

It is possible that bits of code may get dragged around from kernel to kernel - during the unpacking/install - It is also possible to go back to an older kernel. At the grub boot menu choose the Kernel you want to boot to - Once you have chosen the Kernel you want to keep and you have booted into it uname -r will tell you what kernel you are currently ...


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If you have a standard spinning harddrive, E4rat can improve the loading of your system. Link to how to install it- http://www.howtogeek.com/69753/how-to-cut-your-linux-pcs-boot-time-in-half-with-e4rat/?PageSpeed=noscript Also, if you are not using btrfs, this can delay your bootup by several seconds. You can safely uninstall btrfs-tools. sudo apt-get ...


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If you don't want Ubuntu anymore, go ahead and delete it. No harm done. However if you do, obviously deleting it will be bad. So It's all preference. But to answer the question directly, no, no harm to Windows or the computer.


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While I admire you trying to do this through command line, and I wish I could, I can't. Instead I'd suggest: Download grub installation online sudo apt-get install usb-creator-kde && sudo usb-creator-kde Change Cd-Drive/Image to your grub installation, select your USB Drive below, select your other options, and hit 'Make Startup Disk' Now wait ...


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Try this: Boot the computer from Ubuntu. Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-pc grub-pc-bin grub-common grub2-common sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg sudo grub-install --recheck /dev/sda sudo gparted Delete the partition using GParted, close it and continue running: sudo update-grub sudo ...


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I dont really have a lot of knowledge with NUC. But maybe this will work. Take the usb hard drive and unplug it. Leave the usb stick in. Turn on the NAC and then wait like 1 second then plug back in the hard drive. It sounds crazy but it might work. If you can plug it in the second it boots it could work. If your NAC displays something like the Intel logo ...


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Your /etc/grub.d/10_lupin contains an error in line 26: data otdir="${prefix}/share" should be datarootdir="${prefix}/share" To restore that file just reinstall package lupin-support sudo apt-get install --reinstall lupin-support


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I've installed 32-bit versions of Ubuntu on systems with 32-bit EFIs, including both an ancient 32-bit Mac Mini and an ASUS T100. I don't have detailed documentation on how to do it, but I provide an outline in my answer to this question: 32-Bit UEFI Boot Support Either way you do it will involve significant hoop-jumping. My own preference is to stick with ...


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My solution was to get a recovery ISO built by a support tech who had access to my machine's encryption XML file. Third item you need is McAfee's daily recovery code. After fully decrypting the Win7 partition, I was able to boot without issue. My scenario I had was a dual boot Xubuntu / Win7 setup. GRUB gave access to either OS flawlessly. Afterwards, ...


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You can delete the partition using GParted and run sudo update-grub. But first of all create an Ubuntu distro bootable drive and back up your data - anything can happen. If sudo update-grub does not work when you run it from the installed Ubuntu then boot from the bootable drive you created and run the command. That works when the latter fails.


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Install a 64 bit system. This gives you the option of upgrading your RAM at any point in the future. It also allows you to install 64 bit software which would otherwise not work on a 32 bit system.


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Yes you can: Here's an example GRUB config file (this is an earlier version of GRUB, but the concept is the same): default=0 timeout=10 splashimage=(hd0,0)/grub/splash.xpm.gz # section to load Linux title Red Hat Enterprise Linux (2.4.21-1.ent) root (hd0,0) kernel /vmlinuz-2.4.21-1 ro root=/dev/sda2 initrd /initrd-2.4.21-1.img # section to ...


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It's probably a graphics card issue. Try this: Reboot in recovery mode. Go to System Settings > Software & Updates > Additional Drivers Select the driver that matches your graphic card.


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This question is quite old, but I just ran into this and had a different issue: looks like my partition UUIDs changed around, so I had to run sudo update-grub This prompted me to select partitions to install GRUB, and it updated the GRUB installs on the selected partitions (I guess detecting the appropriate UUIDs in the process). Following that sudo dpkg ...


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I too had the same problem and it had to do with BIOS settings. The good news is that you do not need to worry about data loss. You can take a disk image with clonezilla: http://clonezilla.org/ go into your BIOS and delete any unused boot managers, check your disk for errors and then see if the bug happens again. If it does, clone your disk and sanitize ...


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It turns out the issue was caused by grub-mkconfig crashing with the error message Generating grub configuration file ... ERROR: cannot determine partition label for rootfs /dev/sda9 (sda9 held my fs root). Apt crashed because when it tried to install new kernels it ran grub-mkconfig to add them to the boot menu. It wasn't actually a problem with apt but ...


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The sgdisk -v error output summarizes the problem. Basically, the disk is roughly half the size that the GPT data structures claim it is -- the disk's actual size (as determined by the Linux kernel) is 250,069,680 sectors (119 GiB), but the GPT claims that the disk is 457,179,647 sectors (218 GiB). This problem might occur if: You pulled a single disk out ...


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I'm glad you fixed the problem. For future reference, you can use GRUB (or any other EFI boot manager) to switch between two versions of Windows. The way I know to do this requires planning before installing your second Windows, though: Install the first Windows normally. Boot to a Linux emergency disk (the Ubuntu installer in "try before installing" mode ...


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I did "update-grub" and it solved the problem.


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Boot into Ubuntu, and run: $ sudo -i # grub-install /dev/sda # update-grub This should reset GRUB.


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Try this: Insert the Ubuntu LiveUSB and reboot the computer. The machine boots from the LiveUSB. Click the Try Ubuntu Without Installing icon from the LiveUSB Start menu. Ubuntu boots from the LiveUSB. Click Applications from the top taskbar in the Ubuntu desktop, and then click Accessories. Click the Terminal option. The Ubuntu command-line terminal ...


0

I also noticed reduced battery life from like 5hrs to 2hrs max. Did some research and installed TLP. That kind of helped but not much. Some people advised to downgrade to kernel from 14.10 but I didn't want to do it. Instead, I preferred to update to kernel 4. Installing it manually didn't do it so I did some research and found the script that works for ...


-1

You could use remove instead of purge, and then upgrade the kernel, and enter this in the terminal: sudo apt-get -f remove linux-image-extra-3.19.0-22-generic and then delete sources.list file, and enter settings and update and hatch all of the chanoical list and close it again. and then reinstall the latest kernel, and enter this in the terminal: sudo ...


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Okay, so I am going to try to explain this as simply as I can. Firstly, it is a good sign that you have Ubuntu desktop available. We are going to need to use the command line. We are going to be using the terminal, and the following commands: sudo and apt-get The terminal is the magic box of goodness. All you need to do know are the words for the spells, ...


0

RobinHood's answer is worth considering. Boot Repair should be able to fix your problem; but some situations tend to confuse it, so it does sometimes fail. I have some more information and suggestions.... First, your /dev/sda5 is set up as a BIOS Boot Partition, which is used for BIOS-mode booting, not EFI-mode booting. Such partitions are normally 1MiB in ...


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What's the running-kernel? You need to pay attention to this: run-parts: executing /etc/kernel/prerm.d/dkms 3.16.0-34-generic /boot/vmlinuz-3.16.0-34-generic dkms: removing: bcmwl 6.30.223.248+bdcom (3.16.0-34-generic) (x86_64) -------- Uninstall Beginning -------- Module: bcmwl Version: 6.30.223.248+bdcom Kernel: 3.16.0-34-generic (x86_64) ...


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Partition 5 is not necessary. This partition is not used for /boot from your description. You can delete it. SOLUTIONS: You need check the grub.cfg in EFI partition(partiton 1)\EFI\Ubuntu\grub.cfg. Correct the partiton for /boot. Example: search.fs_uuid d17d4033-8152-412f-ad06-f30ecde45d53 root hd1,gpt6 uuid for the partition can be found with blkid ...


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It's hidden by default. Take a look at /etc/default/grub and change it as necessary. Reference.


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Install Boot-repair and repair your grub https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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Try Boot-Repair Live Boot the ubuntu and install it or use ubuntu secure remix which have with boot-repair in it. Connect to internet white working with Boot-repair. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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I have two Ubuntu versions on my system. Sometimes grub will boot into one, other times the other. To be sure of what I'm booting I use a SuperGrub cd. It boots and offers a menu, the first item is "find all OS's on the system." I then get to choose which one to boot. This may not be a "solution" but it is a pretty good work-around.


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Give Ubuntu-Tweak a try. It removes old kernels well for me.


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Try reinstalling that kernel then remove it. Reinstall: sudo apt-get install --reinstall linux-image-3.16.0-34-generic linux-headers-3.16.0-34-generic linux-image-extra-3.16.0-34-generic Remove: sudo apt-get remove linux-image-3.16.0-34-generic linux-headers-3.16.0-34-generic linux-image-extra-3.16.0-34-generic


0

I'm still not sure what the original issue was, but when I rebooting using a "recovery kernel", that seemed to get around the issue, and now my machine boots normally.


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I struggled with the exact same problem but the broken kernel packages were version 3.13.0.57. Inspect the problem: Check the dpkg status of the packages: dpkg --status linux-image-3.19.0-22-generic dpkg --status linux-image-extra-3.19.0-22-generic If the output states that the packages are in bad state, i.e. half installed or not fully installed, this ...


0

Root cause The root problem seems to be that /boot/System.map-3.19.0-22-generic is missing, which prevents reconfiguration/removal of the packet. Suggested Solutions My initial suggestion was sudo apt-get install --reinstall linux-image-extra-3.19.0-22-generic As this apparently fails ("cannot configure half-installed"), I would suggest to do this a bit ...


0

Solved: boot-repair with complete re-install of grub from Live Elementary OS Freya USB (phew, first boot-repair removed current boot setup and aborted). Making incremental changes to add theme settings (--class <image name> modifications only) and testing whether sudo update-grub still works. making all other changes to icon order and names with ...


0

You have a UEFI capable machine, and is sounds like you did a full install to the USB stick. You select whether you are running in UEFI mode in the UEFI Settings/BIOS (not the legacy or compatiblity setting). You did not have the USB present when you ran boot report, so we can't tell how it was created, but for UEFI, at a minimum it should have an EFI ...


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The ZoL PPA for Vivid does not have the software required to make a ZFS root work like you want. This configuration is unsupported for all releases after Precise, which is grandfathered. Advanced users can sometimes get the desired result using the basic ZFS support that is already in distro. In the HOWTO that you are using here, there should be links to ...


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I'm not 100% positive, but a Mac that old probably has a 32-bit EFI, even if it's got a 64-bit CPU. (The first Intel-based Macs had 32-bit CPUs with 32-bit EFIs. When Apple updated to 64-bit CPUs, the EFIs lagged behind for a generation or so before the EFI was updated to 64-bit.) For a native EFI-mode boot, installing in EFI mode is most easily done with an ...


0

I think you should run sudo dpkg --configure -a followed by what has already been mentioned: sudo apt-get purge linux-image-extra-3.19.0-22-generic



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