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Boot your system from live DVD or live USB, then install boot-repair and run it. The following pages help to install and run boot-repair. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair How to install the Boot-Repair tool in an Ubuntu live disc?


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I would recommend checking out the site here. http://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2014/04/install-grub-customizer-ubuntu-1404/ But if you want the command for the program suggested in website, it is here: The program is called Grub Customizer and I have used it before and recommend it. Or moving to another boot loader is good too, which I can help you on ...


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Instead of changing the background color, you could make an image the background. Choose a PNG image, copy it, open terminal, run the command sudo nautilus /boot/grub, input password and Nautilus (Ubuntu explorer) will be opened. Paste your image in the folder you were redirected to. Open a new Terminal window, run sudo update-grub, wait for the process ...


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Well, I would NEVER recommend to delete any GRUB files. After you install Ubuntu, GRUB will be set as default. When you formatted those partitions, you removed essential GRUB files. First you need to know if the vmlinuz file is still in that partition. On grub rescue prompt, type: find vmlinuz And then press ENTER. If this file is still there, then ...


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I read I could just delete the partition which I was about to do through windows 8's Disk managment, Go ahead. Mind though it will remove anything from disk. In case you need to save something use the Ubuntu installation disk to save it. By the way: there is not need to remove it from Windows. You will be prompted to replace a current Ubuntu ...


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So I guess you must have installed the boot-loader sda1 while installing Ubuntu and hence you are landing at grub-rescue. As already pointed out, it is best to use windows DVD and repair the corrupted MBR. If you do not have windows DVD, you can also try using Rescatux tool.


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If you're just sticking with Windows, I would recommend making a usb boot disk to boot into windows and restore the boot partition. I would recommend the same with Linux if you are keeping that.


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If you are directly thrown to the GRUB menu, it's too late for pressing those keys. By this time, GRUB has already "taken over control" of your computer. So you have to press the appropriate key(s) before. I've looked it up on Dell's website: The key required for entering the BIOS Setup menu is F2. Unless your system is quite old, in which case some of ...


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If your question is really not "Why do I get this?" but instead "How can I get rid of this?", try the answer here.


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What I understand, is that your computer is not starting from the USB device. Did you set in your BIOS to boot from USB? Did you burn the image on the USB device the right was or did you just copy the iso like a file to the USB device? What do you mean by: It boot into Grub? Grub is the bootloader. Which Grub? On your harddisc or from USB?


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EDIT with more details: My problem was incorrect device uuids in file /etc/fstab. (the red one is incorrect,the green one added by me and the red one is commented out) After correcting the uuids in /etc/fstab for / and swap (with infos from blkid), it works for me!


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I faced the same problem with Dell Inspiron 15 3542 with Intel HD 4400 graphics. GRUB_TERMINAL="console" Enabling the above line in /etc/default/grub solves the problem but disables the graphical grub and presents a basic text based Grub screen. Mismatch in the resolution of graphical grub and windows boot screen appears to be the cause of the problem. ...


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I managed to figure this one out however I had to reinstall both Windows 8.1 and Ubuntu 14.04. I had to ensure that both operating systems were installed on UEFI by disabling CSM and booting from UEFI mode. I also followed this guide: http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2014/05/31/dual-boot-ubuntu-14-04-windows-7-on-a-pc-with-2-hdds-and-uefi-firmware/ Thank you so ...


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I finally resolved this - without resorting to a third bootloader, and without running boot-repair, which was causing problems rather than fixing them. Maybe my settings were wrong, but I didn't end up needing it. I used 3 partitions for Ubuntu: (1) 1GB for /boot/efi (2) 8GB swap (I have 8GB of memory) (3) root, mounted at / A Ubuntu menu item magically ...


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You've got two disks: /dev/sda is an MBR disk that holds Windows and has the Windows BIOS boot loader in the MBR. /dev/sdb is a GPT disk with an EFI System Partition (ESP). The ESP holds both GRUB and the Windows EFI boot loader, and the MBR holds the first-stage GRUB BIOS boot loader. Note that you've got both BIOS and EFI boot loaders for both Windows ...


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Use Unetbootin to make a bootable image of your favourite OS t, once booted use 'Try Ubuntu without installing' option and later on install it into your partition.


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I also had this problem, but since my machine is different and I am using Lubuntu 14.04, I didn't post here. For documentation purposes, the solution I found is this one: http://askubuntu.com/a/612714/121101. Summarizing: Comment out these options: GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true Change this line to look like so: ...


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It is likely that your /etc/default/grub file contains these two lines: GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true Can't understand why they leave these options there, since they are deprecated in favor of GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE according to info -f grub -n 'Simple configuration'. Commenting out these two options make the grub menu appears right ...


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If you still have access to Linux, try using Grub Customizer. http://ubuntuhandbook.org/index.php/2014/04/install-grub-customizer-ubuntu-1404/ See if you can find your old Ubuntu partition, put it at the top of the list (it doesn't necessarily have to be at the top of the list. I just suggested the top so that it would boot automatically if you don't press ...


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That loader before was not the Windows bootloader; it was the BIOS boot device selection. As soon as the computer turns on, start pressing Esc repeatedly, until the boot menu comes up.


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As far as I can tell your pasted information is from a regular live cd. It says something about squashfs which is a compressed file system that is hardly used in a regular environment. In a menu entry it says something about testing Ubuntu without installing which is a dead giveaway that we're dealing with a live cd. I suspect you didn't install at all to ...


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If you want grub menu to appear you should press Shift while grub is loading. To permanently see grub menu ad boot you'll have to open /etc/default/grub and comment out the line GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0. Then, in order to make the changes effective, run sudo update-grub.


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If you got the HDD version of the laptop this could be a IO thing, as im aware the HDD only has 5400rpm. You might as well check the autostart applications and remove unnecessary software. Since unity is probably demanding to your hardware, you could try the slim XCFE , LXDE or any other performance oriented desktop environment. There are also ubuntu ...


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I dont know what exactly is going on in PC while it is booting but you can reduce boot time with program called e4rat. It worked for me. But last time I used it I were using Ubuntu 12.10. So I don't know that does e4rat work with Ubuntu 14.04.


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Looks like you need to reinstall grub, assuming that it is the first hard drive in your system, from a terminal on the LiveCD, type in sudo grub-install /dev/sda assuming that /dev/sda is your first hard drive in your system. Then type in sudo update-grub to update a new grub file for the system.


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First of all, please check this question to see how Windows can be set as the default for booting: How do I set Windows to boot as the default in the boot loader? To hide grub unless a button is pressed, you need to configure grub to do so: Press Alt+F2, type gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub press Enter and enter your password. Set the options like ...


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Do you see your new image in the /boot directory? $ ls /boot It may be as simple as doing: $ sudo update-grub


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If worst comes to worst, you could try and reset your PC completely using the installation disks or a reset button if your laptop has one. Hope this helps and Good Luck!


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Edit the boot order in your BIOS settings (press F2 during boot) and put the Windows Boot Manager in the top of the list.


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Boot into an Ubuntu Live CD/USB and open a terminal. Run sudo mount -t vfat -o iocharset-utf8,umask=000 /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1. You'll need to run sudo mkdir /mnt/sda1 first. Once it's mounted, browse the EFI drive in Nautilus and delete every folder called "Ubuntu".


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if you have a way to access at least one Ubuntu installation, the answer goes as follows: 1. log in using Ubuntu intallation 2. sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade 3. grub-install 4. update-grub


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Both your disks use the GUID Partition Table (GPT), which means that Windows is booting in EFI/UEFI mode. This is your starting point for any repair, since this detail is not easily changed. The fact that Boot Repair once said you needed to create a BIOS Boot Partition (the "bios-grub flag" you mentioned) means that that boot of the system was in ...


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Boot from a Windows CD/USB and run: BCDBoot c:\Windows where c: is the drive Windows is installed. If you get "Failure when attempting to copy boot files" error. Start diskpart list volume After this, it will list your hard drives. Select the one your OS is on. select volume 0 (0 for first hard drive etc.) list partition select partition 0 (select ...


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Here is how I sorted it withput repair disk: Download Puppy linux puppylinux.org Load it on ypur USB using Unetbootin Boot it and in menu start find System -> Grub4DOS boot loader In a dialog box choose your hard drive with windows on it and select 'Search ony within this device' option. Click OK There will be confirmation regarding name of drive you ...


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Boot to your original Windows disk, when it loads find an option like "Repair your computer", find a way to get in CMD and type: bootrec.exe /fixboot bootrec.exe /fixmbr Then exit and boot the PC up normally and you should be sorted.


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I was able to get a VGA adapter, install Mavericks and manually flash the EFI firmware following this thread. The steps are intended for Macbook 5,1 but the workaround is identical for 5,2. Fortunately the beeping sound is gone after flashing the firmware. Ubuntu 11.04 was responsible for this since it replaced the EFI loader with it's own version. The beep ...


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For future reference, code samples should be entered with four spaces preceding each line. Using carats (>) at the start of the line is used for quoting content, and does not preserve critical code formatting. I've fixed your question so it's properly formatted. See here for more on formatting features on this site. As to your question, there are two ...


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Try this: Boot your Ubuntu installation disc, but select the "try before installing" option. Open a Terminal window. Verify that the /sys/firmware/efi directory is present. If not, reboot in EFI mode. (You were in EFI mode when you installed.) Type sudo efibootmgr -o 2,2002,1,3001. This command changes the boot order so that GRUB is first. (See lines ...


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Concerning speed to enter your firmware setup utility, try downloading the USB flash drive or CD-R version of my rEFInd boot manager. Prepare a medium and boot from it. With any luck, there'll be a menu option on the second row of icons to reboot into the firmware setup utility. (The icon is of a computer chip.) Try that option. If it takes less time, then ...


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As you know, all the files that include grub option names and all the options for editing and renaming are in the directory /etc/grub.d/ The 30_os_prober script could be modified to make them different. I prefer having better control using the generated configuration and disabling os_prober. It's not too hard to copy and paste items from the generated ...


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This community page has lots of details and links. What you need to know is to edit /etc/default/grub and files in /etc/default/grub.d/ then run update-grub to make the changes live. I've not used boot-repair yet but it looks interesting though it's not part of a default Ubuntu installation.


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Check your SSD using GSmartControl, it's also for Windows. When I suspected my own SSD of failing I also tried SSD Life, but I'm not sure if its results are entirely accurate.


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I'm pretty sure my SSD crashed, as it doesn't even show up in BIOS. I tried the power reset procedure for SSDs but it did no good. Well, this is unfortunate.


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Use a different PC , install Unetbootin and create a bootable image of your favourite OS using USB and install it


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Did you previously had windows 8 installed? In windows you can run -> msconfig and check what are the boot settings. Maybe you still have old boot settings, or just the name is incorrect. If so, just edit them (make sure you don't delete the correct one as it will make booting issues). If you never had windows 8 installed, you don't have to worry about the ...


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The accepted answer using sed to remove older kernels permanently has some flaws, if someone has not rebooted the computer after upgrading kernel the command will remove the newer kernel too. Here is an alternate solution that will consider all situations to remove actual older kernels only: #!/bin/bash kernels=( $(grep -Po ...


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I think the problem is in your video card try sudo apt-get install fglrx xvba-va-driver libva-glx1 libva-egl1 vainfo EDIT: Try: sudo apt-get install libcheese* sudo apt-get install xorg-video-abi-15 sudo apt-get install fglrx-updates


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You can install boot-repair. And set the timeout through advanced settings in boot-repair. Click on the Advanced option on boot-repair Now change the Unhide boot menu : 10 seconds to whatever time you want And click apply. If you wanted to install boot-repair checkout this link Installing Boot-repair


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You have enabled GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET, but you haven't specified the timeout length of it (GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0is commented). This is why it is reverting back to 10 seconds. Because GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET has it's own timeout length config line, you need to uncomment the line making the timeout for it equal to 0. Having GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 and ...


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Here is a step by step on how I did it: 1. Install Windows 8.1 2. disable secureboot in bios (or in some cases allow it to run other Os's) 3. turn off fast boot 4. install ubuntu alongside windows.



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