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0

Solved: Resetted the BIOS by unplugging and removing battery and all got fixed somehow.


-1

Install reFind... http://sourceforge.net/projects/refind/ It handles and does all that for ya :P


0

Here is your answer. You can reduce the Timeout of GRUB and then on expiration it will automatically run currently selected OS, which in your case will be "your OS"


0

Yes, you can repair using the windows disk. FOR WINDOWS 7 You probably just need to run (cmd): Bootrec /RebuildBcd and if it cannot locate any missing Windows installations run these three commands from windows cmd: Bcdedit /export C:\BCD_Backup ren c:\boot\bcd bcd.old Bootrec /rebuildbcd Just don't run bootrec /fixmbr. Then, boot up Ubuntu and ...


0

boot-repair has once helped me when nothing else did. But don't forget to backup important data, just in case.


0

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Then pick Ubuntu, with Linux 3.16.0-36-generic to be the default boot (since it works for you). After this go to the following file: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub Then change the grub timeout GRUB_TIMEOUT=0 Save and reboot.


0

In the end, the solution was to find out that there is another bug! When in the GRUB console I typed insmod xfs I got an erorr back that error back that said something like: insmod.xfs error file xfs.mod not found So the solution was to install Ubuntu and selecting the ext3 filesystem instead of xfs !! I hope this helps somebody


0

Boot your Ubuntu system and then enter in the terminal: sudo grub-install /dev/sda


0

I recommend not only separate boot and swap partitions but also a user partition. makes it easier to back up and recover. Boot partitions need to be first on the drive. I am uncertain how SSDs handle that. Ext 2 has more support for some maintenance, diagnostics and repair than ext4. Some say 1Gb for boot partition. You've probably been here already: ...


-1

Download your BIOS update program from your computer manufacturers website. You can try installing it with Wine in ubuntu but likely will not work (worth a try though). Chances are your computer does not have a bios chip but rather loads the bios from a specific hard disk. Same as holding SHIFT key immediately after (or even before) power on. Using the ...


0

Two options in UEFI do not harm. It happens because both UEFI and update-grub wrote there. The best way to 'fix' it is to remove both items using efibootmgr and run 'sudo update-grub'. sudo efibootmgr You will see efi boot entries. Like Boot0001, Boot0000, etc. To remove an entry do, e.g. sudo efibootmgr -Bb 0000 Other options can be found by man ...


0

I solved the problem by deleting one of two identical Boot options in Bios. I am not a pro, only a user. But the message gone away. Maybe this helps...


1

Well My BIOS was really different i didt find the customized option, so i mounted the Efi partition and replaced windows EFI file with th Refind one and it seems to work, now computer Boots into Refind Main menuand i am able to pick systems it seems that did the trick now its working perfectly :D


4

HP BIOSes are a bit weird, I've been struggling with that, too. Does your BIOS Setup look like this (found on newer HP ProBooks), then follow below instructions. This was the only way I managed to get Ubuntu to boot on my laptop with Secure Boot enabled. In the BIOS setup, under System Configuration → Boot Options, you should find the option ...


2

First run this command for a graphical environment sudo systemctl set-default graphical.target Because you have used sudo systemctl set-default multi-user.target before. Then repair the entries in /etc/default/grub This statement is completely wrong: GRUB_DEFAULT="quiet splash" Open the configuration: sudo nano /etc/default/grub and replace the ...


0

So you've messed with GRUB. One easy, fool-proof solution (if not the fastest) is to install Boot Repair. Follow their instructions. If you've managed to get a shell prompt, you might be able to run apt-get commands. Or grab an Ubuntu live CD (tricky if this is your only computer), boot from it then live install Boot Repair (see 2nd option paragraph). It ...


0

Boot into your Windows 7 Setup Disk and select Repair My Computer. On the next screen, select Command Prompt and type the following command followed by enter key. That should make you boot into Windows:- bootrec.exe /fixboot bootrec.exe /fixmbr Restart your computer and then see if you're able to boot into Windows.


1

Use this image and start from USB, when using yumi (pendrivelinux.com) choose install unlisted ISO (grub) option. http://www.supergrubdisk.org/super-grub2-disk/ You can detect OSes and also repair grub. HowTo: Insert bootmedia in to its drive (e.g. USB or CD/DVD) Set the media to be the first booting device in BIOS Then boot; if you used yumi select ...


0

In the end it was not possible to get past this, in spite of all that I tried. So I was forced to rebuild the server from scratch. Good practice I suppose and at least I had a recent backup. The USB drive itself seems to be fine, after reformatting, although I am loathe to risk it again, so have used a different one for the boot partition of my ubuntu ...


1

I found my problem, I was trying to install grub in the wrong root directory. Instead of: sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda I did: sudo grub-install --root-directory=/ /dev/sda


0

As temporal solution, you can add these lines into /etc/grub.d/40_custom: menuentry "Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda3)" { insmod part_msdos insmod ntfs set root='(hd0,msdos3)' chainloader +1 } then sudo update-grub.


1

I find this to be the easiest and quickest way. It keeps the latest kernel as well as two more: sudo apt-get -y install bikeshed sudo purge-old-kernels To change the number of additional kernels that are kept: sudo purge-old-kernels --keep 3


0

AFAIK it's possible that using the Win CD might erase grub. However, even then you can still reinstall grub using a linux live cd or a grub rescue image. Once you have managed to boot your ubuntu installation, sudo update-grub should fix your grub configuration. Now the tricky part would be booting your linux installation. Take a look at this and this ...


0

set prefix=(hd0,x)/boot/grub set root=(hd0,x) after set this values try ls If it returns unknown filesystem try next x value until it returns list of grub configuration files. Then try insmod normal normal System should start to boot


0

install unetbootin from ppa. ok i know the new version dosent support windows ntfs format... but i did it.trust me. format usb drive in fat32 format,then open unetbootin and only choose windows iso and your usb drive.butt dont start process.now when unetbootin is open go to disk app(gnome disk utility) and unmount & format your usb to ntfs. mount it ...


0

First make sure that you are in vboxuser group. To do this run following command: sudo usermod -a -G vboxusers YOUR-USER_NAME then force VirtualBox Module compilation by running following command: sudo /etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup then try to restart virtualBox from command line /usr/bin/VirtualBox restart This should help


2

I can't speak to Rufus. My personal preference is to use dd to copy an image to a USB flash drive, since this results in a medium that usually boots fine in both BIOS/CSM/legacy mode and in EFI/UEFI mode. That said, some computers choke on such media, which employ something of a Frankenstein's Monster approach to their layout. In other words, there's no ...


0

My friend had the same issue when installing OpenMediaVault and Debian 7.0, it failed when trying to install GRUB on /dev/sda (1st SATA MBR). I reckon this may be something to do with the debian installer. Asked him to upgrade BIOS, and try to chroot into the incomplete install and manually install GRUB again. Haven't heard back from him yet, will update ...


1

Ubuntu's live media will boot both in legacy and UEFI mode, and the install is done in whichever mode is booted. Some machines will not boot USB unless secure boot is disabled, but that does not mean you have to go to legacy mode. Try that. Also read: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI ...


0

Simply do install, grub gonna be update with it. After, if you install a new kernel or remove one directly from your system, you need to update grub manually with : update-grub


2

No, you shouldn't remove it. Your current GRUB will be simply overwritten.


-3

Just write the below in terminal dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d' | xargs sudo apt-get -y purge


0

You could have removed GRUB from your hard disk pretty easily, just by deleting some files. That ship has sailed, though.... The easiest way to do what you want is: Start the Ubuntu installation media, but select the option to try Ubuntu without installing rather than the option to install Ubuntu. Launch a Terminal window. Type ubiquity -b or ubiquity ...


4

I found the solution. I followed this solution. I had to change the kernel version in the control panel and reboot through the control panel.


0

First you need to run "scandisk /f" on the windows partition to repair any corrupt files. It has been my experience that removing the drive and placing it in another PC as a slave or external drive is the best way to accomplish this. Once scandisk has run, return the drive to its original PC and try booting (don't forget to reset any jumpers on the drive if ...


-1

your pc not compatible with linux http://www.dell.com/br/empresa/p/optiplex-9020-desktop/pd try other distribution, samble: OpenSuse Suse compuny belongs the Microsoft, due to this great compatibility hardware exclusive windows Platform. att


0

Finally found answer.....Solved perfectly: I use HP so I had recovery partition ,I booted into windows recovery(F11 in my case). Then went to Repair your computer...this should fix my problem But it couldn't find anything.So here is my solution: go to troubleshoot in recovery menu. Click Advanced options in Troubleshoot screen. Click on command Prompt. ...


0

I am reproducing my answer to a similar question. At the grub prompt try these commands: set pager=1 ls Now, suppose the output of ls is: (hd0) (hd0,msdos2) (hd0,msdos1), in order to find the linux root filesystem run: ls (hd0,1)/ which should give you all the files/folders in / such as bin/ boot/ cdrom/ dev/ etc/ home/ lib/ etc. Once this is done ...


1

Run the command sudo os-prober If the output shows you Windows then you are in safe. So From your booted Ubuntu system, use the following command in a terminal: sudo update-grub This should help. If the problem still then from the windows recovery console: bootrec / fixmbr Then bootrec / fixboot then update-grub again from your Ubuntu


0

If anyone else had manually installed an Nvidia driver prior to upgrading and experiences this problem, here is what I did: Boot into recovery mode Enable networking (mounts filesystem as well) Go to root prompt and uninstall manually installed driver (./NVIDIA-installer-name-here.run --uninstall) ubuntu-drivers autoinstall nvidia-xconfig reboot


0

First, you need to be aware that there are two methods of booting most modern computers: BIOS/CSM/legacy mode -- This mode is what was used on most computers prior to about 2011. It uses either an old-style BIOS firmware or BIOS emulation ("CSM" or "legacy") on a more modern firmware. It's usually paired with an MBR partition table. Note that on a modern ...


2

In /etc/default/grub set: GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT="1" GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET="true" GRUB_TIMEOUT="1" That will allow you to have a very short time interval of 1 second to still press Shift while booting to get the advanced menu, while not running into the 10-second problem in if [ "${timeout}" = 0 ]; then set timeout=10 fi in /boot/grub/grub.cfg. ...


0

You can try running a few commands after changing GRUB_TIMEOUT (at grub defaults file) to 0: sudo update-initramfs -u sudo update-grub sudo update-grub2


0

First, try to boot into Windows by fixing it using a Windows Vista/7/8 Disk. To do this, boot from Installation Disk, Select Repair and enter a command prompt. Type in:- bootrec.exe /fixboot bootrec.exe /fixmbr Restart your PC and see if you can now boot into Windows.


0

After following Ron's answer and looking at 40_custom a little closer, I eliminated duplicate sections of: ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/10_linux ### ### END /etc/grub.d/10_linux ### ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ### ### END /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ### (Of course there was content between the BEGIN and END comments.) This eliminated some of the duplicate ...


1

You may be able to fix this problem using the boot-repair utility. Boot your live CD in EFI mode, open a terminal, and enter these three commands, in order: sudo apt-add-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install boot-repair Then, launch Boot Repair from the Unity Dash and it will fix your problem (hopefully).


0

Install Grub-customizer. Grub Customizer is a graphical interface to configure the GRUB2/BURG settings and menuentries. In terminal do: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer


0

Get Boot-Repair Tool and burn it into Live USB. Follow the instructions here. You can also try EasyBCD. post back if this did not solve your problem with the exact error you are getting.


1

I think you have duplicate entries in your 40_custom, just check it once more. To remove the memtest entries, run: sudo chmod –x 20_memtest86+ sudo update-grub


0

If Ubuntu still exists on your HDD, boot from Ubuntu live CD and use the commands below to install boot-repair. Connect to the Internet. Open a new Terminal, and run: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:kranich/cubuntu sudo apt-get ...



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