New answers tagged

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Try changing UEFI loader to the other one available. This fixed my problem.


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In UEFI boot options only recognizes the windows boot. You need to allow non-UEFI boot on BIOS and then select the partition that has the GRUB option.


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For BIOS only: If Boot-Repair will not see Windows an offer to install the syslinux boot loader, you can install it manually. sudo apt-get install syslinux sudo dd if=/usr/lib/syslinux/mbr.bin of=/dev/sda You only want syslinux boot loader as it is a Windows type boot loader that looks for more boot info in the partition with the boot flag. You do not ...


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Ok, if that image represents your PC's true situation, then your installed Windows is pretty much gone for good. Irrecoverable. Because you reformatted that partition from ntfs to ext and did overwrite the allocated space with your Ubuntu. Next i will present the easiest solution i could use and i do use to dual-boot Win+Ubuntu for more than 5 years now. ...


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try the boot repair disk. Its based on lunbuntu and very user friendly.Download here


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It is posible, considering that: If you boot the installation medium in UEFI mode, it will do a UEFI install of the operating system, it will try to write an EFI-format bootloader to an EFI system partition. If you boot the installation medium in CSM mode, it will do a BIOS compatible install of the operating system, it will try to write an MBR-type ...


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change GRUB_TIMEOUT="10" to GRUB_TIMEOUT="0" If you are not dual booting and then sudo update-grub


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If you re-install Ubuntu 16.04 as UEFI then it should sort it out. I was used to legacy boot but finally gave UEFI a try with a newish laptop. It works fine but what I didn't realise initially, when I was trying to install Ubuntu from a USB stick, is that I had to press f12 on booting up (to offer me the 'one-time boot menu') and then select the stick ...


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Hi you can use SystemRescueCd for your problem.Go through the documentation of it it is helpful.


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The chances of anyone else ever having this problem are slim (maybe if someone followed the same guide), but here is how I solved it. Using grub-customizer, I reverted the grub menu to default. Make sure that the menu entry you wish to use is script: linux not script: custom. Then I removed the "Advanced options for Ubuntu" and deleted my old entry. Save ...


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How often do you restart? Periodically, Ubuntu will provide an update to the Linux kernel that underlies Ubuntu. Because that's such a core component of the OS, it leaves the option to boot into the previous kernel version, to mitigate against the slim chance that the new kernel version has issues. After a period of multiple months, you might have several ...


2

Usually nothing. The bkpbootx64.efi is a backup regularly created by Boot-Repair. With Windows the bootx64.efi is just really a copy of Windows bootmgfw.efi. And bootx64.efi is a fallback or hard drive boot entry in UEFI. But Boot-Repair with its 'Use the standard EFI file` in advanced options creates the bkpbootx64.efi and makes bootx64.efi a copy of ...


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You can still use GParted on either the LiveCD or Boot-Repair. Then decrease fs size with the same tool on either LiveCD or Boot-Repair


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According to the BootRepair log you seem to have chosen to erase the Windows installation while installing Ubuntu. There is no way to recover from that but you can re-install Windows in a dual-boot configuration with your current Ubuntu installation (How can I install Windows after I've installed Ubuntu?) or erase Ubuntu for a stand-alone Windows ...


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I'm going to talk about the unknown chipset nouveau error first. nouveau is a set of open source drivers for nvidia. Back when I installed my ubuntu on a dual boot I was using a GTX 970 and I received the same error. The problem is that there are currently no open source drivers for your graphics card so Ubuntu is unable to display anything to your screen ...


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There's an article here: http://www.howtogeek.com/213396/how-to-boot-a-linux-live-usb-drive-on-your-mac/ that says: Think you can just plug a standard Linux live USB drive into your Mac and boot from it? Think again. You’ll need to go out of your way to create a live Linux USB drive that will boot on a Mac. Apple’s made it difficult to boot ...


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Use a CD or DVD instead. If you don't have a DVD drive, download and install from the mini.iso instead. Click here to download the mini.iso Click here for more info on installing using this method. Click here for more info on how to burn a CD or DVD. If you insist on using a USB, you should use the Universal Pendrive Linux installer. Or click here to ...


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Your screen shots aren't showing up for me. In general, multiple entries in the EFI's boot menu should not be a problem. In fact, it's common to see two such entries, one pointing to grubx64.efi and the other to shimx64.efi. If this is what you're seeing, it's perfectly normal. I wouldn't worry about this or attempt to "fix" it unless you think it's causing ...


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Try this from an Ubuntu Terminal Window: sudo efibootmgr -o 0 That should fix the problem. Alternatively, you could use EasyUEFI in Windows to move the ubuntu entry to the top of the boot order list. EDIT: If it's resetting to boot straight to Windows when you reboot the computer without booting into Windows, then your EFI is badly broken. Check the ...


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First make sure that hibernation is disabled - so boot into Windows, open command prompt as administrator and execute : powercfg /h off. Shutdown the PC completely - do NOT reboot. Then install GRUB boot loader to your Ubuntu installation in EFI mode. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media, open a terminal and execute: sudo mount /dev/sda8 /mnt sudo ...


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This would be sufficient as root in recovery-mode after network is enabled : sudo apt-get install --reinstall grub* sudo grub-install /dev/partition For partition you type the booting partition which you are very secure of like for example /dev/sda Then do this following: There is spell-checking error but only slightly ? You could try this : ...


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hey there i too experienced with such problem once but instead of formatting free space you need to format complete hdd{so sorry to say that :( } Because any hdd will have only 4 primary partitions on which any operting system can be installled to be seen in boot loader (grub or burg etc...) so according to my knowledge and experience take backup and ...


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actually there are only 4 primary partitions that can be created for any hdd (because of this u have unused space). Now,take full backup(i know its hard but this will save you alot) then "clean"(windows command) it so that you can create primary partitions where you can dual boot, first windows then ubuntu. One more thing to notice here is if your machine ...


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I was having a very simular issue when creating a bootable USB HDD. believe it or not, lots of forums and instructions only recommend ext4 because I suppose its the most widely used. After many days of reading and experimenting on my flash drive, I noticed one thing while I was making a live USB drive, it was using ext2. SO, I decided to plug my USB HDD ...


1

Some key things I've noticed about your output: You have two EFI System Partitions (ESPs), /dev/sda1 and /dev/sdb1. This is legal, but makes it harder to troubleshoot the computer. Your /dev/sda1 ESP seems to be empty -- or at least, Boot Info Script has not identified any boot files on it. This could be a bug in Boot Info Script (it misses things ...


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I have dealt with my problem by formating partitions and installing Ubuntu from Efi USB option in BIOS. Thanks everyone :D


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Did you try updating the GRUB file? Run the following: sudo os-prober (type man os-prober to see what it does, see here for more info); sudo grub-update (update the GRUB: you should see in the output both Ubuntu's and Windows' boot partitions); sudo grub-install /dev/sda/ (Assuming your grub is installed at /dev/sda: change it accordingly) Hope this ...


2

The two issues are just one: your sda has an MBR partitioning scheme (that's why no EFI partition on it) and your sdc has a GPT partitioning scheme. That's an incompatibility. The install source device (sdc) and the target (to install to) device MUST have the same partitioning scheme in order for GRUB to install correctly. It can be MBR --> MBR, or GPT --> ...


1

Boot into Windows and download and install EasyBCD. Run it, and click "BCD Deployment, click "Write MBR" and then install BCD on your Windows partition (This case NTFS Partition 4). Now go to "Add New Entry" and select your Windows partition, then click "Add Entry". Next, go to the Linux tab and select GRUB2 and select "Automatically Locate and Load" then ...


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Here you go. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQIaDO9nR6Y I've seen plenty of positive comments, so I think that video should work!


3

Ok I seem to have got it with the following (everything is simple in retrospect): $ umount /boot I tried this as I noticed that there were two 'mounts' for /boot: $ mount -l |grep boot /dev/md1 on /boot type ext3 (rw,relatime,data=ordered) none on /boot type aufs (rw,relatime,si=6ea5aad590be877d) And that the latter was overriding the former: $ df -h ...


2

If anyone still cares its actually videoinfo for grub-efi


-1

Your question is not directly Linux/Ubuntu related, so I will only direct you to some sites that may be able to help you. Just know that if you use the programs I am going to suggest, you do so at your own risk. If the drives are really totally gone and these tools on the sites cannot help you there are companies that can do data recovery including taking ...


0

Why struggle with fdisk? Just install GParted and use it graphically. Or use it directly from an Ubuntu LiveDVD/LiveUSB. GParted sees any and all partitions. Guaranteed. GRUB will install automatically with Ubuntu and CentOS. You should be fine with it. The ultimate boot manager i believe is rEFInd, but i wouldn't rush into it unless i know very well what ...


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Do not use fdisk if you are not sure what you are going to do. Use Gparted instead. You can not edit the partition with your current OS, too. So boot your PC from Ubuntu USB stick or any other LiveCD that contains Gparted, and use it to resize and create partitions. Backup important data before that!


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You can simply shrink your ubuntu partition, and the installer for CentOS should let you use that space. I don't know the CentOS installer well, so in reality the answer is that you should shrink your Ubuntu partition using GParted or similar, then follow the installation instructions for CentOS to install it onto the free space you've created. If you need ...


0

Have you tried grub-install ? If you can't use it then... As I see you can run a terminal in the system: Do apt-get -f install As super user. The if it didn't ask to install anything then nothing is broken. Consider : apt-get upgrade //To finish upgrading Last apt-get install -y aptitude && aptitude reinstall grub Now try again with ...


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Easiest way to do this is to download Grub Customizer Under general settings change it to show menu if it isn't already set that way then go to the Appearance settings tab. You will select a theme there and then click save and you are good to go. As for installing those you downloaded you can install them by extracting them into a folder then going to ...


0

Create a recover USB stick from another windows computer, ideally the same model: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-10/create-a-recovery-drive OR order it from Acer: http://us-store.acer.com/erecovery/rcd/ And use that to restore windows. Alternatively boldly proceed with Ubuntu installation. ;)


0

Do not bother trying to fix it. Use boot-repair Connect to the internet, then open a terminal with Ctrl+Alt+t, paste the following commands and run them by pressing Enter: sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair; \ sudo apt-get update; \ sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair The next (dangerous) thing you can do if ...


0

Just repair your windows installation from the windows 10 installation media. This video should help:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z-HKlr_3o0Q You can try out UBUNTU without installing it. Using this trial, you can download the official windows 10 iso from microsoft's website, create a bootable pendrive and you should be good to go.


0

I wrote an answer for a similar issue you can check it out here. The settings with grub can be changed so it doesn't show the menu at boot time if you choose .. you need to edit the /etc/default/grub file and after you make the changes you need to run sudo update-grub or an easier way is to google Grub Customizer for a graphical interface.


1

To force it to come up every time, you need to edit the file /etc/default/grub for example with sudo nano /etc/default/grub comment out the line GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 so it looks like #GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 and make sure GRUB_TIMEOUT is set to something above 0 and enough seconds for you to do something when you get to the screen, for example ...


-1

This is standard for ubuntu and for that matter most other linux distributions when the kernel is updated the package manager retains one previous version and removes the older ones. This is done for a reason, if there is some issue with the new kernel install it lets you boot the system with the previous known good kernel instead. Of course there is no ...


0

So the answer to my problem is semi-unrelated to UBUNTU, Semi because the problem did not exist until i Updated my server to 16.04, but the fix was hardware. After I re installed ubuntu 16.04 twice on my root partition, loosing all the setup I had prior, I learned that some desktops will force SATA0 to be the default OS drive even if one is not located ...


0

If you're running a PC selecting F12 during bootup will take you to the boot options section. If you go to boot-order, or something like that, and push the GRUB boot manager to the highest priority. It should boot to GRUB first after that. If you're running a Mac, it could be the same, but I've never used OSX so I don't actually know.


0

The conceptually simple way to do this is to back up your data and install Ubuntu clean with "use the entire disk" option, then restore data from backup. This isn't the way I'd do it, for a number of reasons, but it's surely the easiest way to do the partition changes you want. Otherwise, you're going to have problems. Deleting the first (or first two or ...


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In answer to your first question: You can find out how to auto-mount NTFS partitions on boot here.


0

Grub is still needed, it tells the OS what kernel to load. You can hide Grub by changing its settings and make it so that it immediately boots to ubuntu and never shows you any options. An easy program to do this with is grub-customizer and then going through settings to make it so that the autoboot is ubuntu and the time delay is 0.


0

It was not an issue with the i8042 controller (my fault) After more research in this awesome place, I could understand that BusyBox comes up when the system could not mount the root filesystem. As this answer suggest, starting a live Ubuntu and restoring a previous superblock will make it work. The controller for i8042 seems to be a different issue :-)



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