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0

If you have multiple installs using grub2, only one of them can be in MBR and controls booting. That usually is the last install. And you may have issues if you installed both originally to MBR of same drive. Grub remembers where it installed and a major update of grub will reinstall it. Or either or both installs may be updating grub. I like to document how ...


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How to Convert MBR to GPT without Delete partition and Loss data Work here: http://cyber-sholeh.blogspot.com/2015/08/how-to-convert-disk-mbr-to-gpt-or-gpt.html https://youtu.be/Ow6qDv0yfgY


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First, there are two distinct issues involved: BIOS vs. EFI -- This is the type of firmware on the computer; or in some cases, because EFIs include a BIOS emulation layer, EFI-based computers can boot in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. The version of GRUB 2 installed on the computer depends on the firmware type. Under BIOS, a 16-bit GRUB 2 (from the grub-pc package, ...


0

Follow these instructions. They may help you. In BIOS, go to UEFI/BIOS boot mode and select Legacy. Change your boot order to have First boot device as USB. Save changes in BIOS and exit. If still your new os doesn't boot, It means that your usb is unbootable. To make a bootable usb for any Linux distro on Linux (other working computer) use UNetbootin. ...


2

If you take a look through /etc/init folder, the command responsible for bringing up TTY is getty. For each TTY there is a *.conf file in /etc/init , so if you want colorized prompt on every TTY, you will have to edit every single one of those files. Now, the file responsible for the contents of that appear on the screen before logging in is /etc/issue, ...


0

It looks like you've got a BIOS-mode version of GRUB installed to your hard disk's MBR, and it's getting confused about how to boot Windows. Your /sys/firmware directory's contents indicate that you've booted Ubuntu in EFI mode, so I'm guessing you're booting your Ubuntu kernels directly from rEFInd, thus bypassing GRUB. In other words, GRUB is useless to ...


0

I would remove the second entry for Windows. That seems to be the default entry, but the first one seems to be a custom overwrite. Just delete the second Windows Bootloader entry and give it a shot.


0

How does your system boot? Via EFI or MBR (CSM)? If the former, I can't see why you couldn't use my guide, but create a RAID10 instead of RAID1 in steps 2+more. For maximum redundancy, I would clone the EFI boot partition to all four drives.


0

Here is what I did that got it working again: Used gdisk to convert the MBR partition to GPT, insert a partition into the empty space (type EF02 "BIOS Boot partition"), transposed its entry with my original partition, and flagged it as legacy BIOS bootable. Then ran $ sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt $ sudo grub-install --root-directory=/mnt /dev/sda It then ...


0

My toshiba (EFI/GPT) started with pre-installed w8.1, and using a usb stick (unetbootin), I simply shrank w8 into a 40 GB 'broom closet' and then installed Mint (Ubuntu). I then had to use boot-repair-disk (see below) to stop windoze always behaving like it was the only kid on the block. The usb was prepared using unetbootin in w8.1 and thus probably ...


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You might like to use boot repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair (installable via USB live ubuntu)


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The reason why it still shows Windows 7 instead of Windows 10 is that the file /usr/lib/os-probes/mounted/20microsoft does not contain the label for Windows 10, so during the os-prober detection of the OS it fails back to Windows 7. To correct this, you need to make the following changes to the /usr/lib/os-probes/mounted/20microsoft file: NOTE: Always ...


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I tried bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi Grub It said the boot configuration data store cannot be opened Access is denied.


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There are few things to be considered, may be these can help you. -As of my experience UEFI installation does not ask whether to install grub, it is automatically installed on your EFI partition. -In order to check if your ubuntu installation has completed properly you can boot ubuntu live, mount the EFI partition and check whether grub is present there. ...


0

It's not really an direct answer for your problem, but if your goal is to have the system run even when one drive fails, a raid 5 would do just that and give you more disk space.


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Hi you could try this see link: Booting into windows Booting problems Reinstalling grub and it might work fine this three ways.


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Maybe the Windows BCD store is corrupted. To fix this boot from Windows install media. On the "Install now" screen choose -> Repair your computer In the System Recovery Options select -> Command Prompt Execute the following commands: bootrec.exe /fixmbr bootrec.exe /fixboot bootrec.exe /scanos bootrec.exe /rebuildbcd Shutdown the computer and boot ...


2

Booting to grub rescue means that GRUB failed to load the ‘normal’ module (which is responsible for reading /boot/grub/grub.cfg, running the menu, etc.) for some reason. The rescue shell as such is very primitive and do not offer most of the normal filesystem commands, tab completion (but offers after you load the modules), history, etc. Instead it only ...


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This is a two-part issue, the first part is ACPI PCC PROBE FAILED. STARTING VERSION 219. SMBUS BASE ADDRESS UNINITIALIZED ade BIOS or use force_addr=0xaddr I am not sure what the cause of this is, but it pops up every time I boot Ubuntu in Virtualbox. According to this question, Boot Error - ACPI PCC Probe Failed the error is harmless. It is possible ...


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It is not grub that is missing, but your Linux partition. /dev/sda2 208,894 416,761,855 416,552,962 5 Extended /dev/sda5 400,158,720 416,761,855 16,603,136 82 Linux swap / Solaris You have a missing partition one or two sectors after the start of the extended and a few sectors before the start of sda5 swap. It probalby ...


-1

I usually use a utility called Boot Repair. Here's the Linux Community page for Boot Repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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Boot into Ubuntu , just as you described, and run sudo grub-install /dev/sda && sudo update-grub. Reboot to test.


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This problem was completely solved by using these three commands in the terminal and then running the repair process through a UI: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair


0

Use" fixmbr" command from Windows disc. It will remove grub. Then use Ubuntu live cd to restore grub. It should start working then.


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This is how i got my booting to work. I do not know about the Updating but perhaps we can get you booting here- http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/install-linux-macbook-pro/ Weather you follow the complete process again or do a work around with the step in Grub, guide should help you. Please let me know how you go.


0

Changing the menuentry to below: menuentry 'Windows 10' { set root='(hd0,msdos1)' #No 'space' between 'root' and '=' chainloader +1 } works for me. I tried this and it took me back to Windows bootloader (installed in my sda1). So I guess it should work for you as well.


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Well, I'd recommend installing Ubuntu MATE (the supported remake of GNOME for modern versions of Ubuntu), but aside from that you should be fine. GRUB should recognize Windows automatically. Just make sure, if you can, to boot into the Ubuntu installer in EFI mode. You'll also want to set the SSD that Ubuntu is on to be before the Windows drive.


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It seems the installer has overwritten your bootloader. Boot from the Windows 8 installer, and the first window will contain a "Repair your computer" label. Then select "Advanced options" and "Command Prompt" Run commands "bootrec.exe /FixBoot" and "bootrec.exe /FixMbr" to fix the bootloader If it says "Element not found" then Windows partition isn't ...


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The problem is caused by the fact that a part of the GRUB boot loader remains installed on the computer, and is being launched by default. Unfortunately, the way Ubuntu sets up GRUB causes it to rely on files located on the Ubuntu partition, and since you've deleted that partition, those files effectively no longer exist. There are several possible ...


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Put the Windows 10 installation disc in the disc drive, and power cycle your PC after setting it to boot from CD Drive in BIOS.(Or LiveUSB) Press any key when you are prompted & select [language, time, currency, keyboard etc.] & click Next. Select Repair Your Computer option in the dialog window. In the System Recovery Options window Click the 1st ...


2

You cannot merge two partitions. You can only delete those partitions and combine them. So here is my opinion: Backup your important data Boot from Live DVD. Delete both the ext4 partitions and reinstall Ubuntu 15.04 You want to keep your files without deleting them, but that is not possible. You are rewriting the partitions. So expectedly, the files ...


0

Live boot from your Ubuntu DVD/Pendrive. Click on 'Try Ubuntu' Open Terminal and enter the command sudo fdisk -l. This will list your partitions in the system. Find the partition that contains your kubuntu. It will be something like /dev/sda7 614408192 3890325503 1637958656 83 Linux Make a note of the dev/sda7 (this will be different for ...


0

To retrieve your 8.1 license key install windows 8.1 from any copy that is "untouched" you can use any license key you have at your disposal, then go to "rweverything.com" download the 64/32 bit "read/write portable utility" and run it, click on "ACPI" button and then in the "ACPI Table" pop up click on the "MSDM tab", at the bottom you should see the ...


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I'm running XUbuntu 12.04 LTS. I went to /etc/default/grub and checked there was some time for grub start-up menu to be seen (GRUB_TIMEOUT set to more than 0). With sudo nano /etc/default/grub I edited the grub settings and added GRUB_BACKGROUND=starfleet.jpg at the end of the file, saving the file afterwards. Then, I copied the file starfleet.jpg to ...


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Removing Ubuntu will not remove the Grub for this you would need to reset your computer to factory. Your best choice would be to repair the Ubuntu installation using the option in the Grub. This will reset Ubuntu. As for the Grub, you can Edit it with the Grub Customizer and Set it to boot Windows if you do not Select Ubuntu and Set how long it should ...


0

There is a work around though for using a RAID as your root device, it just involves a little planning. You start by using LVM to install to a single disk. Then when the operating system is up, you create a degraded RAID1 with the other disk. https://www.zmonkey.org/blog/content/create-degraded-raid1-array Now, reboot and use a live usb stick so you can ...


0

There is a line which indicates a possible problem of the partition containing Linux: Mounting failed: mount: unknown filesystem type '' You can try to mount it manaully and then reinstall GRUB. If /dev/sda5 really is your Linux root partition (or if you had a /boot partition use that instead), from the live medium, open a Terminal and try the ...


0

You need to install a driver for your GTX 960. Run in terminal sudo apt-get install nvidia-346 and reboot without nomodeset.


0

Specifically for my laptop which is a Lenovo G505s,a solution exists. You would have to use Network Boot as the first option in the Boot Order menu. Once I got that working,I decieded not to mess with my system by installing proprietery drivers from AMD. I found the solution at a link here,it is the third comment to the question by masterfink


0

Make sure that when you create the bootable USB drive, make sure the downloaded ISO is not corrupt. Either via checksum or just use a torrent as that's less susceptible to data corruption, it seems.


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I suggest you reinstall it. Follow these steps for manual installation: When you choose a partition for manual install, format it with ext4 and choose mount point as /. Always install Grub on the partition, on which you are installing Ubuntu. This way, you can change boot flag to Windows in case anything goes wrong. After the installation, don't change the ...


1

Your fstab seems to have messed up. I have heard that Windows 10 does some re-partitioning of the hard drive during it's install/upgrade. Why does Microsoft think it is the only OS around? Someone should teach Bill Gates about the term 'dual boot'. Anyways grab a LiveCD of Ubuntu. Boot into the live environment and mount your Ubuntu installation. Open a ...


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I am not an IT professional but Boot Repair Disk saved my back many times, especially when doing a clean install of a new LTS release. It's a live iso that automatically repairs GRUB (it may ask you one or two simple questions like "is it an external hard drive or not"). I read the GRUB info you posted. It says something about ...


0

You can download and use "hirens boot dvd" to get the partions back the way you want, I assume you already have created backup media to restore windows 8.1, if not then you must be having a valid license key for 8.1 or most likely the upgrade will fail/ give warning that you were a victim of piracy and need to activate the licence in 3 days. I would suggest ...


0

Ok, here's what to do, even though this is technically not Ubuntu topic. Go to http://gparted.org/ and download their live iso. After that, boot into it and use Gparted like you normally would, then wipe the table clean. After that, go online and find a Windows 8.1 iso to burn onto a usb/cd so you can reinstall that, then upgrade to Windows 10, and after ...


0

Reinstall Windows 8.1 from scratch. Use a valid legit key (if possible, or the Windows 10 upgrade will fail most likely). Upgrade to Windows 10 from the Windows 8.1 (Windows Update). Apply all the patches to Windows 10. Insert the Ubuntu disk into your machine, boot from it, and the Ubuntu disk partition some free space from the Windows 10. This is where ...


0

Press the Boot Menu option F-Key during the BIOS boot and choose Windows On my Dell laptop, it's the F12 key. Otherwise, you can press the Menu key (F2 on the Dell) and arrange your boot order to Windows first.


-1

Ran into this very issue while installing on a Poweredge with scsi raid. I found that pulling out the USB drive prior to installing GRUB did the trick.


1

Install Ubuntu again using bootable USB. Check this link or link


1

This is quite a useful guide on how to use the "something else" function that Ravan is talking about: Answer



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