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GRUB as a Boot Manager You're thinking of GRUB as a boot manager, which is not wrong but is only part of its function. Boot managers are most useful when selecting between different operating systems. But in its capacity as a boot manager, GRUB also lets you: choose between different kernels manually specify kernel options (like nomodeset) run memtest ...


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Having personally destroyed my boot loader time and time again, I have become rather familiar with the following HOW TO on the Ubuntu forums: [http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1581099] Refer to the chroot section, as that is where I have met my greatest success with this particular issue. If it does not work for some reason, try it again except ...


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Good that you already solved the part of switching from Windows to Linux. The other direction is not that hard: There is the command grub-reboot that does just what you need - see below for detais: If your grub menu entry for the system you want to boot is "Windows", you would just do: $ grub-reboot Windows If you configure the hardware to boot after ...


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I have had the same problem and you can make a virtual drive whit an virtualmachine VM whit windows 8 whir pre installed ubuntu, and then run boot-repair. and it might work fine this way.


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Grub checks GRUB_OS_PROBER_SKIP_LIST against EXPUUID not UUID, so the proper format for GRUB_OS_PROBER_SKIP_LIST is UUID@/dev/???? for example: GRUB_OS_PROBER_SKIP_LIST="A3F5-6DF3@/dev/sda1"


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From boot meny, select recovery mode (ususally second from top), wait for the boot-up till you are presented with the Recovery Menu. Select the root option from the menu and you will drop in the root shell. Re-mount the file system as read-write mount -o rw,remount / Add your user to sudo group adduser username sudo And, exit. exit You will go ...


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Maybe you must go to bios option, and configure advance boot option, change boot mode from CSM boot to EUFI boot option, save setting and restart.


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Hmm I had some issues with secure boot being on. However, try removing the option to view boot manager from Windows. Windows cannot handle more than one boot record on UEFI, no matter what you do. You can change the boot order via MoBo BIOS by selecting the UEFI option under your boot system menu. you should see something like an onboard PXE IPv4 and ...


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Login to Ubuntu and execute from terminal: sudo fdisk -l and please show the answer. -- The fdisk output tell us that you have FAT32 partition at second drive: /dev/sdb1 The Windows boot loader assumes it's the first disk in the system, so You need to tell grub to remap the two disks as part of the Windows entry: title Windows root ...


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it looks like windows was completely removed (where is the ntfs disk?) do you have a second drive? with windows or just one drive? (/dev/sda is the only drive listed in you log) if it is just one drive you have to reinstall windows (resize your harddisk and do not delete all. you can reinstall grub later)


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unknown filesystem grub rescue> This error is due to deletion of the Ubuntu drive where your Ubuntu OS was installed, so set the Windows boot loader by typing the following commands at the grub rescue prompt: set boot=(hd0,msdos6) set prefix=(hd0,msdos6)/boot/grub insmod normal normal The drive msdos 7/6/5/4 depends upon the system user.


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Use windows 8 CD or live USB. Boot into CD/USB and select 'REPAIR' windows. Select the repair with Command prompt(CMD). Type the below commands to get the windows boot loader to normal. Bootrec/fixmbr Bootrec/fixboot After it gives successful message restart.


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I tried the suggestion from @oldfred: Your Windows is installed in UEFI boot mode and Ubuntu in BIOS boot mode. The two modes are not compatible and you can only dual boot from UEFI/BIOS menu and may have to turn on or off UEFI or BIOS boot settings. Grub can only dual boot other installs in same boot mode as you booted grub. You can use Boot-Repair to ...


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You should run a boot-repair via a live CD/DVD or USB drive. That should fix up your GRUB bootloader.


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Turned out to be graphic card driver problem. I removed the card from the computer uninstalled and then reinstalled the drivers and inserted the card again, reset unity and its back and fully functioning.


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I have changed before GRUB_DEFAULT=saved in the file /etc/default/grub. Next, in terminal I typed and ran this: sudo grub-reboot ”Ubuntu, with Linux 3.13.0-34-generic” (tell GRUB to try the new kernel on the next reboot,) sudo grub-set-default "Ubuntu, with Linux 3.13.0-34-generic" sudo update-grub After next start, Ubuntu boots with new kernel. If ...


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I had a similar problem. My Notebook uses EFI and there are entries named HDD and Windows8 Loader. Check if Windows8 Loader has a higher priority than your HDD.


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Sometimes the BIOS disk enumeration differs from grub's. If you get to a grub prompt, try looking at the hd1 disk and see if it is the one you expect (check avail partitions with the tab completion is one easy way). type set root=(hd1, TAB and the partitions will be listed. If you are getting the other disk, edit the hd1 s to hd0 s, try the boot with ...


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it is simple and easy use "wubi.exe " which is easily available on Ubuntu website copy "wubi.exe" in C: Drive >> insert/ Plug Ubuntu DVD/Bootable Flesh Drive and Run "wubi.exe" it will ask user Name and Password to you give it and click on install so simple FYI use this Link: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/WubiGuide


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Look at this article to see how to Try Ubuntu. Make a backup of your Windows Installation and make sure you create a Windows USB stick (unless you have a Windows installation disk) alongwith your Ubuntu USB drive before going further. Secondly, yes you can install Ubuntu manually. Make sure that you do not modify the partition containing Windows. All of ...


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Because it sounds like u will be able to backup your data when accessing it: Boot from LiveDVD, then you can access the Data in the Linux partition. If necessary: Further explanation here for example and in lot of other questions here and forums all over the web ;)


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I booted ubuntu with kernel 3.13.0-32-generic (Not the recovery mode), and I did a software update (Software Updater Application) and this seemed to fix it. I also ran sudo apt-get update I have no idea how or why this happened, but it seemed to fix it. Cliff notes: I am using XServer for video even though I have an ATI Card I have not manually ...


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After installing Windows 8 windows Removes Other bootloader (Ubuntu's) You can Reinstall Grub by following Documentation form ubuntu:- https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RecoveringUbuntuAfterInstallingWindows


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I turned off my computer for about 30 minutes or so while I was researching possibilities, and when I turned it back on to try something new it was suddenly working fine again. I still have no idea what was wrong with it ... but at least it is working now.


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How I cleaned up grub.cfg 0- when a new [Linux] distribution is installed grub-mkconfig will use /etc/grub.d/10_linux to implement the Linux kernel and recovery menuentries. OS-Prober will [/etc/grub.d/30_os-prober] use 30_os-prober to find other OS [Operating Systems] often the start up menu may have unwanted, superfluous or even dead entries. ( a ...


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Please post your default grub file. Post what you see when you type sudo gedit /etc/default/grub if grub_timeout is equal to 0, change it to 10.


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For this user case probably the best "solution" is to re-install Ubuntu with full encryption (LUKS). This would secure the data and prevent changing the root/users password(s). This could be defeated with a few methods, both hardware (key loggers) and software (custom kernels), but both of those options are unlikely. The OP can assess these risks. With ...


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Yes. Set the root password. Open a terminal, and do: sudo passwd Enter a password. Then the root shell in recovery mode will always ask for this password. Note that all this is futile as he can boot into a live USB and change your password. Ultimately, given physical access, the security battle is lost.


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Semi-easy (I think) Grab your Windows 7 Install Disc and repair the Windows install. It will automatically recreate the boot table. Grab your Ubuntu Install Disc and open a commandline. In that, type sudo grub-install /dev/sda. Boot into Ubuntu and open up a commandline. Run sudo update-grub


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Edit your grub.cfg. menuentry 'Mac OS X (on /dev/sda3)' --class osx --class darwin --class os $menuentry_id_option 'osprober-xnu-64-6834a4ed4dccef17' { insmod part_msdos insmod hfsplus set root='hd0,msdos3' multiboot /boot } Works fine in Ubuntu 14.04 and Mac OS X 10.9.4.


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It turns out that this is a DigitalOcean issue, not an Ubuntu Issue. Go to the Control Panel in DigitalOcean. Select the appropriate kernel by clicking settings->kernel and using the dropdown Run sudo halt on the VPS to turn off the server gracefully Wait a bit Run control panel's turn off as it never seems to think the server is off Use the control panel ...


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Try using "nomodeset" in the boot loader -Hold Left Shift during power on to get into GRUB -Press 'e' to edit the boot command line -Locate the Linux line that has other commands like quiet and nosplash -Add "nomodeset" (w/out quotes) to the line (I usually place it after "quiet") -Press F10 to boot -Once logged in, install the proprietary driver With ...


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Did you manage to find a solution ? I've tried all sorts of thing, but stuck on the same problem as well. And this is also a fresh install.


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What you are seeing is truncated. It actually reads "linux-signed*". Please see the last line in the top box of this image disk repair screen shot


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A possible solution, is the one boot-repair uses, which is to rename the windows bootloader to a backup name, and copy in the ubuntu bootloader (grubx64.efi , unsigned, without secure boot) in place of the /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi. Windows tends to rewrite the boot order, no fix for that. You should stay in UEFI mode to continue to boot Windows ...


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A fix for this is to use SuperGRUB2Disk to look for Os's and list partitions etc. You can mount it onto a USB it using Unetbootin Hope this helps


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These commands are a little more generic then for kernel version 3.13.0-24 only. $ mount /dev/sda3 /boot/efi $ cp -uv /boot/vmlinuz-* /boot/initrd.img-* /boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/ '/boot/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic' -> '/boot/efi/EFI/ubuntu/vmlinuz-3.13.0-24-generic' '/boot/initrd.img-3.13.0-24-generic' -> ...


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It sounds like you've already tried variations on the "bless" command, but I can at least confirm that it is possible to fix this on a setup just like yours. I too have a MacBook 4,1 and I just installed Xubuntu 14.04.1 (32-bit) on it a couple of days ago in a single-boot configuration. Right after install, I was having the 30-second white-gray screen ...


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Here is how I fixed the problem: In a quiet moment, I had time to risk downtime. So I rebooted the system with a Ubuntu 14.04 Live CD and reinstalled Grub. I did not encounter problems and afterwards, the system booted normally. Here is a general description: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2/Installing#via_the_LiveCD_terminal From memory, here are ...


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To re-configure Grub run sudo update-grub in a terminal. This will check your partitions and will generate a new grub.cfg file. This is also stated at the top of the file you edited: # # DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE # # It is automatically generated by grub-mkconfig using templates # from /etc/grub.d and settings from /etc/default/grub # To configure your grub ...


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So when I (Shift + Reboot) over Windows it shows the menu for "Use a Device" from there I can choose the Ubuntu partition and after the reboot it loads grub2. So I start reading other questions/answers and I find a very long answer with different scenarios, I already tried the most except one, the BIOS... So I entered to my BIOS and in the boot section I ...


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Finally i managed to boot, here is what i did: (i dont know what exactly solved the problem) Install Ubuntu 14.04.01 with manual partitioning create own partition for boot (ext4) install and reboot -> still same error insert boot-repair disk (not ubuntu live cd, the preconfigured ubuntu package with boot-repair) repair mbr - with repair partitions checked ...


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Depends on the situation. Is it a new install? How big is the drive? GRUB has issues with larger drives, it cannot find the boot file as it cannot search very far. Best way around this is to make a small partition at the beginning of the drive with the boot on it. (needs to be a /boot drive)


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As Bain suggested, adding the "nomodeset" parameter solved this issue for me. From the GRUB menu when the Ubuntu installer boots, use 'e' to edit the boot parameters. Use the arrow keys to get down to the kernel line (which will probably include things like "nosplash" or "root=...". To this line, add "nomodeset" and then you can hit Ctrl-x or F10 to ...


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Boot-Repair(help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair)


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It will overwrite the grub bootloader as you fear, but with a livecd you can run a sudo update-grub command on the disk and it will resolve it


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The is still an answer possible to the part of the question "Teaching to fish...": could use to find the answer myself without having to do a 14.04 reinstall just to find out? I did a search for /etc/default/grub on http://packages.ubuntu.com/#search_contents: Sorry, your search gave no results Stripped the first /etc, so the second source ...


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It sounds like GRUB only knows of the kernels you've deleted and not the ones that still exist. I suggest running a boot-repair. On a VM (of which I've never tried boot-repair before), you should try starting the VM, booting to a live USB or DVD (iso file works), installing boot-repair, and running it. Hopefully that will fix your options upon normal boot ...


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I also have this sort of problem when I upgraded. To solve this you have to boot with help of live CD of ubuntu. Then you have to install boot repair using these commands in terminal sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get ...


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Here you go: # If you change this file, run 'update-grub' afterwards to update # /boot/grub/grub.cfg. # For full documentation of the options in this file, see: # info -f grub -n 'Simple configuration' GRUB_DEFAULT=0 #GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian` ...



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