New answers tagged

0

The same problem was solved by changing SATA port.


0

Use EasyBCD: (http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/) Under BCD backup/repair, go to BCD management option, and select Re-create/repair boot files and click perform action. This will wipe GRUB and doing this you cannot go to Ubuntu anymore. OPTION 2 (thx @NathanOsman): LIVECD/or USB You have to sign the waviers and leave Windows. Make sure you have a liveCD! Boot ...


0

You can use Windows' built in tools to fix it. Follow the steps under Fix the MBR in Windows 7 or Fix the MBR in Windows 8 or 8.1 here You probably only need to run "bootrec /fixmbr" and "bootrec /fixboot" Windows 7 Boot from the Windows 7 installation DVD At the “Press any key to boot from CD or DVD…”, press any key to boot from the DVD Select a ...


0

Boot from ubuntu cd, mount your root partition, chroot into root partition an change your passwords. 1 boot live cd 2 open terminal 3 sudo -s 4 mount /dev/sda1 /mnt , if sda1 is your root partition. 5 chroot /mnt 6 passwd root New password New password 7 passwd youruser New password New password 8 exit 9 umount /mnt 10 reboot


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News: I was able to run from the live-pendrive and install by using the nomodeset param. I learned how here: Trying to install Ubuntu 14.04, monitor says mode unsupported/out of range Bsically, pressing the "e" key in the grub menu and adding that string after the words "quiet splash".


1

While you can do this, it may be more convenient to use chroot jails to hold your multiple installations of Ubuntu. This has a downside that you will need to use the same kernel for all of your installations, but the upside is that you can use them at the same time, without needing to reboot, and don't need to partition your disks for the individual ...


1

I suggest you first install Ubuntu 14.04 and during installation make 3 partitions of 250gb ssd each disk formatted as ext4 and mount one partition as / , also format the other disk where you want to save data as /home . Then install Ubuntu 15.04 in the second partition of 250gb ssd and format it as ext4 and mount it as / and mount the other disk where you ...


7

No problem. That is normal when you have 2 or more operating systems. Pretty simple. Assume you have an empty disk and boot into the installation and are at the partitioning setup. create 4 partitions. Ubuntu OS needs a root of about 25Gb that can include a /home/. 25Gb is more than enough if you keep your own data outside of the system (ie. out of / and ...


2

When you install MS Windows 10, it overwrites the Grub contents in MBR to its own. All your Windows and Linux OS files are intact and good. All you need to do here is to repair you GRUB files. I used boot-repair and it worked very well for me. If you want to fresh install everything, Install Windows 10 first and then install Ubuntu. It is possible from ...


0

Try booting with windows bootable media, like USB or DVD, then choose option to repair. Go for start up repair, and if it won't find any problem, open cdm while still using windows bootable media, and type the following commands bootrec/fixmbr bootrec/fixboot That should work. If you are using win xp use fixmbr command instead. Also, you can try with ...


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You may want to try following the readme at: https://github.com/erichs/bootnukem git clone https://github.com/erichs/bootnukem.git cd bootnukem sudo ./install.sh Then ./bootnukem --dry-run


0

You have two options. Reinstall Ubuntu revert to the standard loader of Windows If you choose option 1 reinstall Ubuntu alongside Windows but, you want to remove grub, so follow the steps below Find the Windows installation media use used to install Windows. Set the boot priority to that media by going to setup utility when you start the PC Boot ...


0

There is definitely a problem with the driver of the GTX 1070 on Ubuntu16.04. I install my GTX 1070 recently and it works perfect on win10. Then I setup a new Ubuntu16.04 as a second OS. At first, nothing went wrong during the setup process. But when the setup process finished, my desktop reboot into Ubuntu, the only thing I could see is the wallpaper ...


0

Yes, it is possible and not very difficult. You can use a tool named Grub Customizer. To install that write: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer I'm using an answer from another part of askubuntu.com, more informations are provided there. Another way is to edit the grub2 ...


1

Boot into Ubuntu and install an app called Grub Customizer. Open a Terminal window and type: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer (Press Enter after each line of text). Go to the main menu and start Grub Customizer. You can change default timing (those 10 secs) in the ...


0

open the tty conf in the /etc/init/ directory comment out those lines in the ttyX.conf files: respawn exec /sbin/getty -8 38400 ttyX Example to disable tty1: sudo -H gedit /etc/init/tty1.conf Then edit by inserting # in front of the commands #respawn #exec /sbin/getty -8 38400 tty1 Save and Reboot


0

Have you tried using grub customizer? Here are the instructions for installation... sudo add-apt-repository ppstrong texta:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Give this thread a look! It's where I got this from. Maybe almost a duplicate, but not exactly.. not sure in this case. How to remove ...


1

Regarding Android x86 6.0 The "EEEPC" assignment is only for ASUS EEEPCs, only use it if you have one, otherwise use android_x86, do not use generic_x86, you will get stuck at the boot animation and have to restart by using CTRL+F1 to access the terminal and issue reboot as the GUI will not get loaded. I know this because I spent several hours following bad, ...


0

In the file /etc/default/grub find and turn off (comment with "#") two lines: GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true After this run update-grub. This method together with the previous advice of jflaflamme was helped me.


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1.Boot the system with the ubuntu LiveCD. 2.open the Terminal and type sudo fdisk -l it will list number of partition look which Device contain partition of the type 'Linux' 3.Copy the Device name containing the partition For example after typing sudo fdisk -l It may list some device list like /dev/sda1/, /dev/sda2/,...


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Spent an hour trying to figure this out on Ubuntu 16...no posted solutions worked but good news I figured out how to do this, it easy! in terminal; sudo gedit /boot/grub/grub.cfg search for "background" and change ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/05_debian_theme ### set menu_color_normal=white/black set menu_color_highlight=black/light-gray if ...


0

By lucky i solved by problem. I boot with the liveusb and call the Disks and manually deleted all partions of the SSD. Then i reboot with uefi enabled in the computer firmware. I entered the liveusb ubuntu desktop and from there i installed the ubuntu. I checked the two boxes saying install updates and software from others. This solved my problem (but it was ...


0

Depends entirely upon your bios and exactly what level of automation you desire. Suppose.... you have 2 HDD. You can install win on 1 HDD and ubuntu on 1 HDD. When booting, some bios will enable a function key that allows you to select which HDD is the boot HDD for your session. To test this, burn the ubuntu iso to a DVD or a usb stick, and try to boot from ...


0

Yes you can choose the disk you want the installer to put Grub (bootloader). You just need to know how to set the partitioning yourself manually. When choosing how to install Ubuntu where the first option is to "Erase entire disk and install Ubuntu", the last option is "Something else" Choose that and you will be presented a GUI to handle partitioning. ...


0

I found the answer! For some reason, my computer overwrote bootmgfw.efi, and rewriting it is quite simple. menuentry "Windows 10" { insmod part_gpt insmod chain set root='(hd0,gpt5)' chainloader /EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi } Thanks for trying, though!


1

In your original answer, you wrote: When you install Windows, Windows assumes it is the only operating system (OS) on the machine, or at least it does not account for Linux. So it replaces GRUB with its own boot loader. This isn't true under EFI. Well, Windows is still pretty rude, and could be said to assume it's the only OS, but it does not replace ...


0

You're probably running into this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/grub2/+bug/1091464 If so, two workarounds come to mind: You can disable Secure Boot, as described in more detail on this page of mine. This has the drawback that you'll lose the benefits of Secure Boot, which is designed to protect the computer against pre-boot malware. You ...


1

I gave a similar answer a few minutes ago: Ubuntu installed, but GRUB not showing up Try out boot-repair-disk . This should fix your problem. And don't forget to save your files before you do that ;-)


1

Have you already heard from boot-repair-disk: https://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ This helped me a lot in the past. Simply generate a live usb stick using boot-repair-disk and boot from the stick. Of course you should have already saved all your files. Who knows what might happen... Edit: You can generate the live stick by using for example ...


0

http://www.howtogeek.com/114884/how-to-repair-grub2-when-ubuntu-wont-boot/ This website will walk you through the steps I used to fix this exact problem with the bootloader.


-1

You need to install a bootloader. When you install Ubuntu over Windows sometimes the bootloader gets fudged. /dev/sda1 *or whatever sda(1,2,3,) you are using.


0

Try this: Insert Ubuntu Live-Dvd/Usb. Ensure the bios boot order is set to read the media first and start the computer Select Ubuntu Live / Try mode. Click on purple Ubuntu search button - enter gnome-terminal and click on its icon In a terminal run: exec sudo -i mount /dev/sda4 /mnt mkdir /mnt/boot/efi mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi for i in /dev /dev/...


0

From Ubuntu run efibootmgr -v to see all the entries in the boot order. Then use efibootmgr with the -o switch to reorder them the way you want, with Ubuntu first. See more detail in the man page: man efibootmgr


0

Try selecting "Advanced options for Ubuntu", and hopefully you should see a selection of older Ubuntu kernels. Select the newest version. If you're able to boot, open a terminal window and type: sudo update-grub, then enter your password. Reboot the computer, and you might be fine again.


5

part_msdos is the module used to access DOS partition tables. From the GRUB documentation: (hd0,msdos1) Here, ‘hd’ means it is a hard disk drive. The first integer ‘0’ indicates the drive number, that is, the first hard disk, the string ‘msdos’ indicates the partition scheme, while the second integer, ‘1’, indicates the partition number (or the PC ...


0

Boot from a live usb Go to terminal and type sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair sudo reboot Now try normal login. Hopefully everything will work fine now.


0

Well - looks like all I needed to do was rerun update-grub. The grub.cfg entry I posted in my question was already fixed by grub2 itself - something must have gone bad during one of the updates. Originally, the broken grub.cfg entry showed root=/dev/md127 instead of the root=UUID=... line. The above grub.cfg boots properly. Issue solved.


0

You have an UEFI motherboard with Ubuntu installed in UEFI mode. This is good. You have Windows installed in Legacy mode. This is bad. You can only boot one or the other, and it appears GRUB is installed to be used in UEFI mode. So you cannot boot a Legacy mode operating system from UEFI-mode GRUB IIRC. to get truly seamless dual-boot you'll need to ...


-1

I think you need to reinstall grub. follow this guide http://howtoubuntu.org/how-to-repair-restore-reinstall-grub-2-with-a-ubuntu-live-cd


0

Windows Boot Manager bootmgr, manages the boot process. UEFI-based systems contain a firmware boot manager, Bootmgfw.efi. The BCD settings for the device and path elements in Windows Boot Manager indicate the firmware boot manager. The path element specifies the location of the Windows Boot Manager application on that volume. For UEFI systems, path ...


0

Old question, but as it happened to me yesterday, I solved it like this: I turned off the computer, physically disconnected the incriminated hard drive, started again the computer, then ~ $ sudo update-grub Done this, I switched off the computer, reconnected the hard drive and my old Windows 7 partition, no longer existing since 2 years ago, didn’t show ...


0

I interpret your answer as "Ubuntu is not booting, when I select Ubuntu in grub (the bootloader)" Boot with a Ubuntu live disk/USB Stick, open a terminal and run sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt chroot /mnt update-grub close the terminal, shut the live Ubuntu down, remove you stick/disk, power the pc on and select Ubuntu


0

For those encountering the same issue, the first thing to try might be simply to change the boot priority order in the BIOS. I had the same problem with an Acer Aspire V3 with W8, after I installed Ubuntu 16.04. After powering on the computer I pressed F2 to get the boot menu (it might be something else, F12 or esc on other computers), then selected the ...


0

Okay, did some digging and figured out that if you used BOOT REPAIR I could probably recover. After installing BOOT REPAIR and allowing the tool to run and restarting the laptop, I was presented the option of choosing Windows or Ubuntu! I have successfully launched Windows! So, now I can NOT launch Ubuntu when I select it!? Hear a sound but nothing appears ...


0

How did it stop working? Did you change any bios conf? Added removed or changed the order of any disks? what the command lsmod gives? and insmod normal? ls comes from a grub module usually at /boot/grub/x86_64-efi/ls.mod (x86_64-efi depends on your arch). When booting grub try to load the "normal" module and if it fails it will go to rescue (that is what ...


0

Tested on VBox with Ubuntu 16.04, enp0s3 → eth0 Option 1: Override udev rule sudo ln -s /dev/null /etc/udev/rules.d/80-net-setup-link.rules Update RAMDisk sudo update-initramfs -u Option 2: Create a systemd link file sudo vim /etc/systemd/network/10-eth.link Let's define name related to MAC: (There are many options, see the linked reference)...


0

Windows tools can't read Linux filesystems as Kev says. Your next step, as you guessed, is to fix GRUB. There's a dandy tool called "Boot Repair" that is designed to fix such problems. Here's a How-To Geek article about how to use it, and here's the official Ubuntu documentation. Good luck, and let us know how it goes in the comments!


1

The best way to dual boot windows and Ubuntu in UEFI mode is to First Install Windows so that While installing Ubuntu, grub can recognize windows. The other thing to keep in consideration is that the GPT partition is UEFI in bootable usb.(The easy way to make bootable usb is to use rufus).


0

Someone much smarter than me found the solution. I just ran these commands: sudo dpkg --configure -a sudo apt update sudo apt-get install -f sudo apt upgrade sudo apt install systemd-sysv ubuntu-standard


0

I have a acer aspire E 15 - E5-573: After trying different times different bios configurations, ended installing ubunto studio 15.04, note version i386 not amd64, with ethernet connection and the bios set to - Legacy. Ubunto studio immediatly after disk load made the upgrade to version 16.04. Another important thing is to check the bios version, if it is 1....



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