New answers tagged

1

You can go ahead and start installing Ubuntu 13.04 rather than downgrading as mentioned in this thread. It will be less efforts to install 13.04 and more cleaner approach. Moreover you already have the disk partitions on which you need to install Ubuntu. I would check with the release notes of that software(OpenFOAM) -in general the software/tools that i am ...


0

Try sudo grub-install -d /media/91a82071-fccd-4fdd-80e7-654acba2fe6e/usr/lib/grub/i386-pc/ /dev/sda I had a similar problem and it worked. That's because it's looking for a file within that directory called modinfo.sh (just like you wrote). You can look for that file in said directory.


0

Yes you have overwritten Windows. Another thing i noticed is that "SecureBoot maybe enabled." Make sure secureboot is disabled in BIOS completely. You have to install Windows and make sure you have a recovery media for Windows. Best of luck.


2

"I think I've overwritten Windows boot loader with GRUB." Yes, you did - and unfortunately maybe even way, way more ! There is no Windows operating system installed on the disk. That is why Windows is not listed and cannot be booted. When you want to have it back, you have to reinstall it. Sorry for being the harbinger of the bad news for you.


0

Resolved this by installing Ubuntu 15.10 on LiveUSB instead.


3

Reinstall Ubuntu GRUB boot loader. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On desktop open a terminal and execute : sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt sudo mount /dev/sda1 /mnt/boot/efi for i in /dev /dev/pts /proc /sys /run; do sudo mount -B $i /mnt$i; done sudo chroot /mnt grub-install /dev/sda update-grub Note : sda ...


0

Type the following commands & change disk partition according to your system. ls set prefix=(hd0,1)/boot/grub #note maybe (hd0,2) or (hd0,3) set root=(loop0) set ls /boot insmod /boot/grub/linux.mod linux /vmlinuz root=/dev/sda1 loop=/ubuntu/disks/root.disk ro #note maybe sda2 or sda3 to match #2 above. initrd /initrd.img boot When you get ubuntu ...


0

Try going into system setup and there windows boot manager.I got it by doing that but unable to find it in the intitial grub


0

If you are just trying to run nano in the terminal gksudo is the wrong command. If you want to call up another terminal emulator in which to run nano the first thing you need to do is make a launcher Using your example: gksudo "lxterminal --command "nano /etc/default/grub"" The graphical frontend of sudo launches a terminal emulator, and then executes ...


0

Already fixed. Fixed by restoring grub boot menu and update-grub. Now the login screen works


2

First of all : You have to install Ubuntu in the same mode as Windows is installed. When you have installed Windows in EFI mode, then do this with Ubuntu as well. Second : When there is no boot menu to be seen, disable GRUB hidden timeout. Open a terminal and execute: sudo apt-get install gksu gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub Place a # in ...


0

If you look at your pastebin contents there are 3 red flags: What is sdb1? __________________________________________________________________________ It is vfat and contains the following Boot files: /boot/grub/grub.cfg /syslinux.cfg /EFI/BOOT/grubx64.efi /ldlinux.sys =================== UEFI/Legacy mode: This live-session ...


1

I am not knowledgeable enough to answer weather GRUB is required or not, but if your goal is to hide GRUB completely , I have a better solution than the accepted answer. In order to achieve the fastest possible boot, instead of having GRUB wait for a timeout, it is possible for GRUB to not print the menu, unless the Shift key is held down during GRUB's ...


0

pavucontrol works partially to me. By setting Profile to off just the video stream no more fast but audio still doesn't will output anymore.


0

Try this sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair For more details, refer this link Please make sure that both Windows and Ubuntu are installed in EFI mode. Also disable secure boot in BIOS.


0

In addition to Boot Repair, you could try my rEFInd boot manager. I recommend you start with the USB flash drive or CD-R version, although this will require disabling Secure Boot, at least temporarily. If you can boot to both Windows and Ubuntu with rEFInd, you can boot to Ubuntu and install the PPA or Debian package. If this works, you can try re-enabling ...


1

In your pastebin, it's mentioned that: Please disable SecureBoot in the BIOS. Then try again.Do you want to continue? So you should disable secure boot in your BIOS completely. Also make sure that Windows 10 and Ubuntu are both installed in EFI mode.


2

Edit: Reading the full e2fsck output, I don't believe that the file system is salvageable. You will need to perform data recovery, format the partition and re-install Ubuntu. From the e2fsck output, it looks like the file system was damaged badly. The super-block is lost but the back-up super-block is still usable. You can try to fix the issue (see later), ...


1

GRUB does not normally give boot options for external media; for that, you normally use your firmware's built-in boot manager, which you access by hitting Esc, Enter, or a function key (usually F8 or above) just after powering on the computer. Alternatively, you could install my rEFInd, which does show external media. (You may have to hit Esc in rEFInd to ...


8

All the other answers start good, advising you that GRUB is usually there whether you see it or not, you probably shouldn't start taking random potshots at it, and how to restore your system to the 'hidden GRUB' you (presumably) previously enjoyed. However, they end up going wrong - in making blanket statements that GRUB is always required, when this is ...


25

You cannot uninstall GRUB. As your installation stands, GRUB is necessary to boot Ubuntu (that's why it's called the bootloader). Every OS has a bootloader, and every OS needs that bootloader to boot (lots of booting :P). EDIT: As people in the comments have pointed out, there are alternatives to using GRUB. However, there is no reason to switch to one, ...


0

Do not try to remove grub, it is used as the bootloader for Ubuntu, just like the Windows mbr, which you just do not see. You could try to install the program grub-customizer, which lets you define different settings for grub in a simple GUI. You could set the timeout to 0 and tell it to always boot the first entry, so you will directly boot Ubuntu without ...


0

I was able to solve my own problem. I removed the RAID configuration. Not the most elegant solution, but it worked never the less.


-1

Try this, a little tedious but worked for me: If the system boots without showing you GRUB, when it stalls press "ALT+F1" (or fn-ALT-F1) to enter console mode. Enter your credentials and when the prompt appear enter : sudo nano /etc/default/grub Then find the line "GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=“quiet splash" and enter after "splash": ...


0

Once you are in Windows - Click Shift plus shutdown and choose the option to boot to Ubuntu. Once you are in Ubuntu then try this. First let's try to get into Ubuntu and then do this: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair for more information, please refer this ...


0

Turning off Secure Boot was unnecessary in your case and is, generally speaking, inadvisable. If Secure Boot causes a problem, it will be a problem that causes Ubuntu to not boot at all -- you wouldn't even see a grub> prompt. The fact that you got into a desktop well before you disabled Secure Boot means that it's not the problem. If you're seeing a ...


1

Given your comment, I suspect you may have something left over on your EFI System Partition (ESP). Mount it and, if Ubuntu is no longer installed, delete the EFI/ubuntu directory tree. You may also need to delete EFI/BOOT -- but it may hold Windows files, so that could help or make things worse. You can mount the ESP in Windows by opening an Administrator ...


0

My situation: new notebook ASUS UX303UB with preinstalled Windows 10 Home and 250 GB SSDorChip My desired state: One partition with Windows 10, one partition with Linux destribution (Ubuntu 14.04.3), one partition for personal data files. I have in "BIOS": Boot -> Fast boot = Dsiabled and Security -> Secure boot menu -> Secure boot control = Disabled I have ...


0

Try to change grub.cfg for Windows 7. Boot your system to the GRUB menu. Select (highlight) the GRUB boot menu entry Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda3) Press e to edit the GRUB boot commands for Windows 7. Your current boot command should look like: insmod part_msdos insmod ntfs set root='hd0,msdos3' if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then ...


0

I will recommend doing boot-repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair You can get more information from here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair "Active operating system was windows 7, with pre-installed windows 8 on it (but not activated)." What ...


0

I reformatted my main partition with ext4: Went into terminal with Ctrl+Alt+F1. Then formatted the partition as super-user: sudo mkfs -t ext4 /dev/sda2


0

From your windows 10 Run a cmd as adminstrator and type: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi Reboot


1

To enable the grub menu to select the kernel, you have to comment the line in /etc/default/grub #GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 Then you have to run update-grub and reboot and the grub menu should appear.


0

Does you have windows option in boot menu. Try to repair the boot. First log into ubuntu and execute these commands in commandline: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair type boot-repair in terminal or search in Dash. Run boot-repair by clicking on it. select ...


0

I guess you have installed ubuntu in the Wrong partition(which is C: drive). To confirm: Boot your ubuntu os and search for directory which have folders below.(perflog, Program files, Users, Windows) If no, you need to install windows Operating system again. if yes, start your ubuntu os and follow this ...


0

F2 key method Turn the computer on. If you see an invitation to press the F2 key to enter Setup, do so. The Setup (BIOS) screen will appear. If this method does not work, repeat it, but hold F2. F12 key method Turn the computer on. If you see an invitation to press the F12 key, do so. Boot options will appear along with the ability to enter Setup. Using ...


0

Do you have the recovery disk(USB) for Windows 10? I will suggest do a fresh install of both the O/S. First recover the system and install(recover) Windows 10. Then create partitions for Ubuntu from Windows only(using disk management tool). Make sure secure boot is completed disabled in BIOS. If windows 10 is installed in EFI mode, make sure that Ubutnu is ...


0

To access files on Windows, you can mount your Windows partition with read-only privilege. eg. sudo mkdir /media/windows sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o ro /dev/sda3 /media/windows This works for me on my Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 dual booting system. To enter into Windows 10, you should check your boot sequences in bios settings by selecting Windows UEFI ...


4

Repair GRUB boot loader with a built-in tool. Boot from the Ubuntu installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On Live desktop open a terminal. Execute these commands : sudo mount /dev/sd** /mnt sudo grub-install --boot-directory=/mnt/boot /dev/sd* Note : sd* = disk | sd** = system partition Use GParted to identify the partition ...


1

This error states that on line 66 of the file /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober, there is a closed curly bracket} that has no open match. Use a text editor to remove line 66 from your file. It helps to use vim with highlighted and colorized syntax. Doing so not only makes it easy to find line 66 but the curly bracket is displayed as white and highlighted in red to ...


0

I have changed my hard disk, because of this annoying task. I am using SSD now and everything works out. Maybe this is not a solution to my problem, but I would say that this is a workaround. Also I have already posted in the comments above I have changed I have change inside BIOS from legacy to UEFI.


-1

Have you tried this, and enter bios and set to legacy boot, and then from boot enter command line, and enter this: test hd1 badram hd1 dump hd1 and then use set secondary=hd1 and it might work fine this way.


1

Not sure what computer brand you are using, but instead of hitting F12 for boot options try using F2 (or what ever option gets you into CMOS) and right arrow over to the "boot" tab. Here you can choose which drive to boot from (the Linux drive or the Windows Drive). Select the drive you want to boot from, hit F10 to save changes and reboot. Also try ...


2

You've got the lot: Logical volumes, overlapping partitions, unknown file systems, ... So: the best thing you can do right now is to stop using your hard disk! Then boot from an Ubuntu 15.10 Live DVD and: (increasing numbers means increasing difficulty and less of your data will be recovered) Restore your latest full system back-up. If you don't have a ...


0

I had a similar problem. What I did was to leave the installation as it was, then I made sure my drive was in UEFI mode and booted from a live CD and installed boot-repair. To do this I had to add the yannubuntu repository and then download it with apt-get. This was done the following way: sudo apt-add-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo ...


1

I found out eventually. Edit /boot/grub/grub.cfg Find ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ### menuentry 'Windows 10 (loader) (on /dev/sdXX)' After chainloader +1 Write ntldr /bootmgr It did the trick and fixes the shit. Thanks all for your hints.


0

I solved the problem by reinstalling windows 10 MBR on the the first hard drive using a usb drive. The I installed grub on the second hard drive (where Ubuntu is) and I put it as first in the boot order. Grub is now able to recognize the window partition and everything works fine.


0

Never mind. Seems as if it was the Universal-USB-Installer's fault. Tried Unetbootin and it works now.


0

Setup your USB boot media the standard way, and it will be able to boot in either UEFI or legacy mode. It's possible to convert your legacy Ubuntu install to UEFI, (add the /EFI/ubuntu bootloaders, change a few files like fstab, but it's far easier to just reinstall in UEFI mode when you have the proper media. How you can boot the media depends upon the ...


0

I strongly suspect, but do not know for certain, that you've installed Ubuntu in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, and that you've got an EFI/UEFI-mode Windows installation. Such dual-mode installations always complicate matters, and should be avoided. Unfortunately, avoiding them takes some general EFI know-how that is, as yet, not as common as it needs to be. Another ...



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