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Boot to Ubuntu and use efibootmgr: Open a Terminal. Type sudo efibootmgr to see your boot order (or sudo efibootmgr -v to see more detail). Note the BootOrder line and the Boot#### numbers for all the entries on that line and for the ubuntu entry. Note that the numbers are in hexadecimal. Determine the boot order you want. ubuntu should be first, possibly ...


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The easiest way is probably to launch Ubuntu from a live usb, download boot-repair and let it reinstall grub.


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The problem was that a bunch of weird stuff had shown up in /etc/grub.d (no idea how). I restored it with the contents of the live CD of that same path. Also I re-installed grub-pc sudo apt-get install --reinstall grub-pc and let it overwrite the current etc/defaults/grub so that it all is normal again. Don't forget to run sudo update-grub to regenerate ...


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Have you tryed to boot from USB and enter the terminal, and type this in: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get -y install boot-repair && boot-repair and it might work fine this way. more info at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair


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You can reboot with this command: sudo reboot


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You manually configured your /etc/default/grub. That's why this problem appeared. Remove this GRUB_DISABLE_OS_PROBER="true" GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="reboot=b Then run sudo update-grub It should be fixed. The last line is crap. And GRUB_DISABLE_OS_PROBER does not let to find new kernels. There may some other hidden errors in that file. Here is the default ...


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The current kernel for LTS Trusty: linux-generic-lts-trusty: Installed: (none) Candidate: 3.13.0.55.62 To install it run: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install linux-generic-lts-trusty Make sure you also have dkms in some cases required like manually installed video drivers etc. To install it run: sudo apt-get install dkms During kernel ...


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When your computer boots up, enter BIOS and change the boot settings so that the default device is your hard drive and not your USB or CD.


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Remove the installation media (disk or usb) and then reboot.


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Well I didn't get very much input into my problem, but I uncovered a solution and will post it here for posterity. The clue came from this article I needed to add two modules to /etc/initramfs-tools/modules 1) sata_nv which is what makes the SATA controller where the GPT drive connects, work 2) usbhid just in case I get dumped into a busybox shell again. ...


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We have a similar question here that was already solved. Take a look if the same solution works with your issue too. Click this link: Are these sata errors dangerous?


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Since i cannot comment i will do it like this, Take a look at this: I can't get grub menu to show up during boot


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If you press the Insert, F2, or + key, rEFInd will show a menu that may hold additional options, depending on the OS type. From the options submenu, you can press the Insert, F2, or + key again to edit your boot loader options. A simple text-mode line editor opens, enabling you to move a cursor back and forth in the line with your arrow keys, delete text, ...


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You can boot a LiveCD from CD/USB, mount Ubuntu and chroot into it. After booting the LiveCD open a Terminal and type sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda. This will show you which partitions are in use: $ sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda Disk /dev/sda: 17.5 GB, 17515986944 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2129 cylinders, total 34210912 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = ...


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@ Martin Croft: Thanks a lot ! My USB ports are not 3.0 but I visited my BIOS config and found the solution: I enabled "USB keyboard" in the Peripherals tab. When I said I was a newbie !! Next time, I will search more deeply before asking ! Raphaël


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If you changed permissions recursively (with -R option) then you have a problem, because you have to restore the right permission for each file. If you only changed etc folder permission it is easy to solve. Download and burn the ubuntu install cd (it is a live-cd). Insert a live-cd (or a live-usb) in your computer and boot the machine using it (remember ...


1

I managed to solve it , it was pretty silly. I used boot-repair to restore the EFI partition. I created a FAT32 partition of 230mb at the head of the disk and flagged it as boot using gparted. After this, the boot-repair was still complaining about missing the EFI partition ("Your system boot is in efi mode but no efi partition was found. You might want ...


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If you have a recovery partition on your hard drive then you can install Windows once again (restoring the factory settings). You can just delete the Ubuntu partition(s) in the process. If you don't have a recovery partition you'll need a Windows install disk. Either you have such a disk, which you don't or you'll have to buy a new one. Ubuntu is not ...


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You can use VMware or virtual box, and load any OS inside the VMware. Third party software not showing in boot loader so when ever you want to load Ubuntu or any other OS just run VMware. But the thing is you need to run windows, so it just like a parallel way run other OS in windows. Thanks


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I don't think you can just check whether this will works or not before trying to do it, but instead you can get a preview of your GRUB instantly so you can be sure that your new configuration is loaded correctly in GRUB. This could be achieved using a tool called grub-emu. man grub-emu NAME grub-emu - GRUB emulator SYNOPSIS grub-emu ...


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I found out what the problem was after about an hour of googling the problem was systemd so I replaced it with upstart by running these $ sudo apt-get install upstart-sysv $ sudo apt-get remove ubuntu-standard systemd-sysv $ sudo update-initramfs -u $ sudo reboot


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Start the computer with a live-dvd/usb. After the load open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: $ sudo -i # fdisk -l Fdisk will inform your partitions as they are called, something like: Disk /dev/sda: 74,5 GiB, 80032038912 bytes, 156312576 sectors Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size ...


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Boot into a live CD and try this Ubuntu option instead of the easyBCD one in windows. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair I've had similar issues.


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Did you run sudo update-grub to make grub recognize the Windows installation? Maybe you have to modify some settings in /etc/default/grub, too. For example, GRUB_TIMEOUT and GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT.


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SD cards are accessed by circuitry on the computer's motherboard (or an SD card reader attached by USB, etc.). This circuitry requires drivers, and not all of them are well-supported in Linux. The nature of your error smells to me like a buggy driver. If so, you may just have to live with it until a driver fix is released. Filing a bug report may help, but ...


1

The easiest way to get rid of the grub on the hard drive is to boot to an ubuntu installation CD and open either Disk Utility or GParted and use either to wipe the hard drive completely blank. I suspect that what is really happening is that the hard drive is booting instead of the CD-Rom. If you can press whatever key brings up the boot menu, you can ...


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I would set up the new disk with an EFI partition. It wont take up much space, and gives you the ability to easily move the disk without having to change existing parition sizes to add an ESP later. I would use the --removable on the grub-install to put a copy of the grubx64.efi bootloader into /EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi. (If you are using secure boot, you ...


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There are several ways you may wish to approach this one, I have tried to be complete as possible and hope that one of these solves your problem. Is it needed? If you don't need upstart at all, just uninstall it: sudo apt-get purge upstart that will cause it to be removed from automatically from the menu too In the case that you NEED upstart (probably ...


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Perhaps it's not properly initializing the chipset or video card, or there is some issue with ACPI..If you can enter your BIOS Try to boot your windows Installation Disc....The Problem is due to Corrupted Drivers.So it is better to reinstall Windows..


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there are several methods to run a BootInfo, see the Ubuntu community doc about BootInfo. you can use GRUB-Customizer or manually edit GRUB.


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GrUB will write code and data to some devices which will utterly confuse some BIOS USB code. The only thing I found which will make some of my systems not freeze is to format the first partition (e.g., /dev/sdb1) as VFAT (intending it to be used for GrUB boot. And that doesn't work for all of them, but it seems to help with some. I mean, if you don't do ...


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I had the same issue and none of the other fixes worked. What ended up working, I don't know why, was to put a program into the Windows Startup folder. In an attempt to do something I put the installer for the network driver into the startup folder, as well as putting a folder that had some items the installer needed. When I rebooted the keyboard and mouse ...


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Try this: Boot from a Windows 8 recovery Cd/Dvd/Usb. If you don't have a recovery drive , then you will either have to install the drive into another Windows 8 machine or obtain a Windows 8 recovery drive. You will need to choose the language and time settings. Choose Repair Your Computer. Choose Troubleshooting. Choose Advanced Options. Choose Command ...


1

You deleted your kernels and GRUB files, so you will not be able to boot anything. Get a Live CD/USB of a distribution you want and install it in that same partition. Then you will be able to boot Windows again.


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First, log into Ubuntu (yes, you will have no panel and no launcher but we will fix that). Then, go to Ctrl + Alt + F2 and execute the following commands: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager export DISPLAY=:0 ccsm press Ctrl + Alt + F7 When ccsm opens, scroll down to the unity plugin and enable it. EDIT: After ...


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Following this answer fixed it for me: http://askubuntu.com/a/156956/422210 (install Boot-Repair and press "Recommended Repair"


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After a lot of readings on the web i realized that the software i used unetbootin does not create uefi compatible bootable usb and then i tried rufus to make a uefi compatible bootable usb and it worked!


0

The Lenovo forum thread to which you link clearly indicates that the problem is (or at least can be) caused by a faulty cable. Thus, my first suggestion is to follow the advice in that thread and replace the cable, or at least re-seat it. This WikiHow article describes how to replace a SATA hard disk. Just replacing the cable is a subset of that procedure. ...


2

Yes, you can do it, if your computer has UEFI. Set Windows default OS in UEFI settings. Set Ubuntu default OS in grub. Set grub to be hidden. That works for me, but it may depend on UEFI.


1

I solved it with the tip at the end of the boot info : I used bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\debian\grubx64.efi but i have to do it every time i restart my computer -_-'


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You can also go into the BIOS and disable UEFI boot and select Legacy Boot instead.


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Because you are trying to disable the splash screen, use the standard command line text editor for Ubuntu: sudo nano /etc/default/grub Make your changes and update the Grub config sudo update-grub


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Use Windows 7 to create a bootavle DVD. Download Ubuntu ISO, double click the file to create DVD. Restart and boot from DVD.


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Create a live USB for Ubuntu 64-bit (e.g. with UNetBootin) While on the live USB installation, select "Do Something Else" and make /dev/sda1 an "EFI" partition with size 150MB. It must be a minimum of 100MB, recommended 200MB. Partition the rest of the drive however you want ( / and swap, / and /home and swap, whatever). Use primary partitions only (you ...


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Any resolutions?? Yes. Don't do that. Don't expect init=/bin/{bash,sh} to give a functional system that you can just use as normal. It doesn't. You have the burden of doing everything by hand that normally a proper system manager program would be doing for you. Don't expect shutdown, and indeed quite a few other system utilities, to work in the ...


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Does sudo update-grub detect fedora 21? There is also a GUI program for grub repair called Boot-Repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install boot-repair boot-repair Run the recommended repair. If that doesn't work, boot-repair generates a log which might point out the issue.


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and thanks for the help. After some more searching between my coworkers and I, we found a solution here: UEFI boot fails when cloning image to new machine Thanks to @RodSmith for the answer. Regards, Austin


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About the iso file that act as a bootloader to Ubuntu, I beleave that you mean a boot disk. It's possible, and exist the Super Grub Disk 2, that can be used for that.


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Maybe this should help : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Cheers


0

Basically you need to update the bootloader from Ubuntu. You can do this by booting a live-ubuntu to make the neccessary changes there: ubuntu-community Please also have a look here for specific configuration you might need.



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