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0

go to windows , and open cmd.exe as administrator , execute mountvol S: /S then taskkill explorer.exe then explorer.exe then go to my computer , get in to the volume labeled as S: look for grubx64.efi or something like that and delete it


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Newer grub packages now provide to add files with own modifications at /etc/default/grub.d/ . In my case I was able to modify grub with my packaging by: thopiekar@t91:~$ cat /etc/default/grub.d/emgd.cfg GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="$GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT vmalloc=256MB selinux=0 vga=current" Thank you all anyway :)


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You can edit the grub configuration file at /etc/grub/grub.cfg, removing the offending entry and then enter sudo update-grub, however this can be a little difficult. An alternate solution is to use GrubCustomizer sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer Then run the program ...


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Like Agustin, I found that my issue was with the OS Prober. Doing one step better than his solution, I found this gist that will let you have your OSes but still hide the menu. You just need to download those two files, put them into /etc/grub.d, and give them the same permissions as the other templates in that directory. If you ever want to access your ...


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You can try downloading Boot Repair Disk, BOOT to the repair disk and click on > (Recommended repair) and let repair disk do its magic, reboot and you might have a fix. Boot-Repair-Disk is a free download from sourceforge.net it is a bootable software.


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So: The problem were: Grub bugs when the HD is the only slave IDE drive. You have to make your way to make it master. After that you have to re-install grub, witch i did tough installing boot repair in a live CD https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Problem solved


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First theres a tool in Ubuntu called start up disk, this one will install the boot aswell, next you have 2 options that depends on each motherboard: Boot Menu, generaly F12, it will ask where you want to boot from and you only have to click USB and your good to go go into bios and search for boot order, there you should put have something like 1-Hard ...


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here are some methods that will help you to recover system if kernel is remove by mistake http://askubuntu.com/a/28100/294611 http://askubuntu.com/a/46696/294611 http://askubuntu.com/a/100953/294611 all three answers above are different ways to do the same thing, try atleast one(since all are same). First read all the answers then try the method you ...


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The problem turned out to be a hardware problem. I followed this manual to adjust the blacklist.conf file: http://www.thomas-krenn.com/en/wiki/Resolve_mei:_Init_hw_failure_or_mei:_initialization_failed Now the PC boots fine everytime.


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When you install Ubuntu, the GRUB bootloader will replace the existing Windows bootloader, but it will not replace the HP Compaq notebook's splash screen that appears during boot before the Windows logo appears on the screen. The splash screen is a function of the motherboard that provides a visual cue for accessing the BIOS. Because the splash screen is ...


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No. It won't replace the screen that say F12 for more boot options.it is because that screen is displayed by an independent software called Firmware BIOS. First displaying F12 option it will show you Grub where you can select Ubuntu and it's advanced options


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In recovery mode, Select resume start up. If you are booted into Linux Terminal, Then probably , your previous installations has messed up you GUI Unity. Try re-installing ubuntu desktop via apt $ sudo apt-get install --reinstall ubuntu-desktop Then Reboot. Hope this helps


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The answer to your problem is to disable Fast Boot on Windows 8. To disable it - All Control Panel items -> Power Options -> System Settings Click on the 'Change settings that are currently unavailable' link to make the Shutdown options available and Untick the Turn on fast startup option. The reason for this is explained below with content from this ...


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The temporary fix - overriding the initial mounting of the root.disk to rw (read/write) instead of ro(read-only) is good. It's the only way to boot Wubi after a 14.04 install (or upgrade). However, there is a better long term fix than permanently modifying the mount to read/write. It's best to modify the way the loop device is created in order to allow ...


0

i found this post on the HP support forum, it is not particular to HP as it doesn't depend on hardware in any step. so the steps are as follows: 1- In Windows , run cmd.exe as an administrator 2 -mount the UEFI partition using : mountvol X: /S change X with a drive letter of your choice 2- now kill the explorer and re-execute it, using Taskkill /F /IM ...


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you can use boot repair burn it as image on cd and leave it . it will repair every thing. http://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ after that u can boot ubuntu again.


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What I did instead of editing fstab and grub: I backed up those files on the fresh install of ubuntu ( tar -cvf /somedir/boot.tar /etc/fstab /boot/grub/grub.cfg ) Restored from backup ( tar -xvpf /mnt/remotebk/full.tar ) copy restored fstab file (cp /etc/fstab /somedir/fstab.restored) restore my fresh install boot files ( tar -xvpf /somedir/boot.tar -C / ...


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It is safe to have a triple boot setup as long as you have enough empty hard drive space. Make sure you backup before partitioning. You can use the same Swap partition since it is used only while the OS is running. But do not hibernate one OS and then boot in another OS, because when you go back to the first one, it will not be able to wake up from ...


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First of all if you had all your data in your Ubuntu partition (as I understood) , you said that you formatted it. Secondly , you noticed that Ubuntu installed in your DATA partition (which formatted all your data in DATA partition). So as I understand you did both the Ubuntu and DATA partitions format. Thirdly you don't see DATA partition because when ...


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Use Ubuntu Boot Repair: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair Use unetbootin (http://unetbootin.sourceforge.net/) to create bootable usb disc with the boot-repair iso file. Boot into usb and click 'automatic repair'


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Try disabling Fast Startup on windows8, it causes a lot of troubles. It may helps you, and it will save you for problems with your disks. http://winaero.com/blog/how-to-disable-or-enable-fast-startup-in-windows-8-1/


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i have no experience with DELL hardware , but i might show you my way on HP, i use the quick boot menu on HP it is F9, i choose boot from EFI file , and i navigate in the EFI partition for the file grubx64.efi then press enter, it starts then the grub menu, you can then do choose whatever you want tell me if this helps, good luck UPDATE : i found this link ...


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The log says: Syslinux MBR (4.04 and higher) is installed in the MBR of /dev/sdb. I think you've installed grub to the secondary hard drive. You should install in /dev/sda


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Did you install windows after linux? Linux is capable of setting up a grub which can boot all your operating systems if windows is already installed, but if windows is installed on top of linux it will reformat everything.


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Use Boot Repair Disk Open Terminal sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo sed 's/trusty/saucy/g' -i /etc/apt/sources.list.d/yannubuntu-boot-repair-trusty.list sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair Start boot repair disk and select stand recommended repair. This will fix everything!


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I had the same issue as the Nikki until today, when I fixed it accidentally by making a hardware configuration change. My hardware is different from the Nikki's. I am using the Intel graphics built into my Dell Optiplex 7010. Since I changed from legacy boot to UEFI, the grub menu had been displayed at a low resolution, while the frame buffer continued to ...


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Citation sudo apt-get install cryptsetup # Installs the tools we need to deal with encrypted partitions sudo modprobe dm-crypt # Inserts a module we need sudo cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sda2 cheer # Unlocks the partition sda2 and names it cheer Enter LUKS passphrase: key slot 0 unlocked. Command successful. # # Now that we ...


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Run ubiquity -b or ubiquity --no-bootloader to skip the grub installation step. See ubiquity --help for more details.


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You will have to create a 'boot' partition while installing Ubuntu so that grub may be installed in it. Otherwise, although Ubuntu may be installed, you will not be able to boot into it. For instructions, refer to this page.


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Ok During the installation you are probably asked to select where the Grup loder should nbe installed! Select SDA - no numbers that is your windows drive - you would want to be asked what to start during boot (Ubuntu or Windows)! So you have to install it in your primary boot sector, not on your Ubuntu Disk (then it is not inwoked, unless you change the boot ...


0

First please remake a bootable usb stick with unetbootin or imagewrite and try using another iso (ie the 32 bit version). If that fails you can try using http://www.plop.at/en/bootmanagers.html as a boot manager (make a usb or a cd with it) to boot a usb from it? Also if the keyboard does not work inside the manager try: search you bios/cmos configuration ...


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I love boot repair but ONLY as a live CD. The one and only time I ever installed it on an installation intending to fix that installation, it rendered the installation completely unbootable, so I beg you, please do not install boot repair on the drive you are trying to fix. Always run boot repair from a live booting boot repair cd or self booting usb flash ...


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I'm not certain, but it seems likely your cd/dvd (optical) drive isn't working. I recommend you borrow an external USB model from a friend, or even buy one. They only cost about $16 these days. I just looked this one up on amazon at that price which I purchased last year. It works fine. They can be very handy in service work, and if your internal ...


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Pulled from here 2nd option : install Boot-Repair in Ubuntu either from an Ubuntu live-session (boot your computer on a Ubuntu live-CD or live-USB then choose "Try Ubuntu") or from your installed Ubuntu session (if you can access it) connect to the Internet open a new Terminal, then type the following commands (press Enter after each line): For Ubuntu ...


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If you're looking at your grub2 configuration (use bootinfoscript for a quick summary), you'll notice that the first step in the boot process is to look at the MBR, and find an entry point from where to load the code needed to access all those mysterious filesystems a PC BIOS never dreamt of hearing about. If you lack bootinfoscript, you probably want to ...


0

I doubt if you are able to "click" on the GRUB Boot screen. Have you already tried 'update-grub'? However, to fix Windows boot, insert a Windows bootable repair/recovery media and attempt to fix the MBR. There should be a utility to scan your active Windows installation and then rewrite MBR. For example, Windows 7 and 8 has a bootrec utility. Once it is ...


0

This is not a problem: Grub is the boot loader for Linux and will always be present at boot time, prior to starting Ubuntu. You can set the Grub menus not to show, which sounds like what you want. There are several ways to edit and update Grub - since you are new to Linux, I'd recommend a graphical tool called Grub-customizer: Open a terminal and type ...


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GRUB will be there even if you like it or not. Believe me, its there for a good purpose, for example, if your system fails to boot, you can go into the recovery from the GRUB. But i f you dont want to see the GRUB screen at all, you can do the following. We need to edit the grub configuration file. Type the following command into terminal gksu gedit ...


0

I found that changing my GRUB CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT line to the following works on my Lenovo y510p: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="nosplash quiet acpi_backlight=intel_backlight" To accomplish this, run this command: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub Make the edit, save / exit gedit. Then run the command: sudo update-grub Now all you need to do is restart by ...


1

Can you boot your computer to the live CD/DVD? If so, and if the computer appears to work correctly booted to the CD/DVD then open Disk Utility from that CD/DVD and check to see if the hard disk is healthy. It has been my experience that when people install Ubuntu on old computers and have problems, the cause very often is that the hard drive is sick. On ...


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This question is not about Ubuntu, but however! First insert windows disk and boot it, then go to fix section and fix the windows startup


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Try a Windows bootable repair / recovery CD or DVD to rewrite the Windows MBR and then do a update-grub operation. That should resolve it. You can mount the Windows partition and view files so your Windows installation may be still intact. It's just that since there is no valid MBR entry for Windows, os-prober / grub is ignoring it.


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The short answer You can create a bootx64.efi binary from within the Ubuntu live media with grub-mkimage and write a custom grub.cfg to chainload the loaders you wan't to boot and copy both files to the EFI System Partition (ESP) into the directory \EFI\BOOT\. If you don't know your way around in the terminal, the script available in the following section ...


0

This is not an option you can select in GRUB, it's a BIOS option. In your BIOS, you should be able to select a default video output for boot up.


0

I'm also experiencing this with 14.10. It seems to be the latest kernel i believe that is causing this as prior to updating it everything was functioning correctly. Also did a reinstall of 14.04 and everything worked as intended then did live upgrade to 14.10 and issue reappears. Another thing I noticed was that when I fdisk the drive that Ubuntu is ...


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I solved my own problem. Please note that although steps 1 and 2 depend on my hardware, the rest may still be useful. Downloaded newer BIOS image from the manufacturer website. Thankfully I have a new-ish motherboard, so updates are still being produced (M5A99FX Pro R2.0). In "Advanced Mode" in the BIOS, under Boot Options, there were now 2 separate ...


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You could use a live dvd/cd/usb to install in the empty space and when it installs grub2 it will (should) pick up windows and add it to the grub menu.


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What can I do? Is it possible for me to recover my Ubuntu installation, or at least boot into my Windows installation? There are couple of things you can do here. I do not think you will be able to recover your Ubuntu installation as the partition was not just deleted but was also merged with existing Windows partition from Windows. But yes, by all ...


0

Yes, duplicate uuids will confuse the system. This is one reason why you should not be playing around with dd like that. Another reason is that dd wastes time copying free space. If you want to backup and restore the system, use tar instead. If you insist on using dd, then don't copy to a second partition -- copy to a file instead.



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