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Just swapping motherboards should work, so take the step by step approach: From your live media CD, run the memory check From the live media CD, mount the old disk and run a filesystem check. Check any BIOS disk settings that may need to be changed for an old disk. Did you have other disks on the old system? Check the disk jumpers if anything was ...


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You might have to create a separate /boot partition(if you have not done it already during installation) I think this can help you: boot partition


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I figured it out. Windows has a unique bootloader that unetbootin - designed for linux - doesn't correctly see and use. Used a friends computer and made a flash drive with rufus with no problem whatsoever. Thanks for being completely useless for three months.


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First, reset BIOS to the default settings: Turn on the computer and immediately press the F10 key repeatedly, about once every second, until the HP Computer Setup opens. Then, under the Main menu, use the down arrow key to select Restore Defaults. Select "yes", click "yes" to save. Reboot. Next, disable secure-boot Immediately press the Escape key ...


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You need to boot an Ubuntu Live image from a DVD or USB drive, then use the chroot method to reinstall the bootloader. Follow these instructions and you should be good to go: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Grub2/Installing#via_ChRoot To write the Ubuntu ISO image to a bootable USB stick in Windows you can use Win32DiskImager ...


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If you do not have it yet, install GRUB Customizer: $sudo install grub-customizer ...and make sure that GRUB can see both OS's. If it can, double-check the "General Settings" page. In the "Advanced Settings" check the values of GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT, GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET and GRUB_TIMEOUT. If GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT is greater than zero, then GRUB is ...


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Problem solved! I just had to disable Secure boot in the bios and now I can boot both in Linux (Lubuntu) and Windows. I still have 5 entries for Windows, some work, others don't and I don't know why... As long as it works :D.


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Looks like you are using UEFI booting and GPT partitioons (the newer way). So you can ignore the message about the missing MBR. I suggest running gparted and checking if your /dev/sda2 partition has the boot flag. For some reason, that seems like a common problem. I've answered a similar question previously.


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this took me a while but it payed off it was a mix of my own digging and answers above first make sure your /etc/default/grub and /usr/grub/default/grub are the same. then run gksu gedit /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober near the top are the two lines we want but to find them search for styke and change that line to hidden then search for a timeout line it should be ...


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Looking at your sudo parted --list output, you've put your boot partition onto the LVM... Bad idea! Head to The Linux Documentation project to read why you shouldn't... boot is not included on the LV because bootloaders don't understand LVM volumes yet. It's possible boot on LVM will work, but you run the risk of having an unbootable system. [sic]


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if you are trying to put ubuntu and windows 7 on the same hard dis, it's a lot easier to install windows first and leave some free space on the drive. then install ubuntu. if you have already installed ubuntu it can be done if you have free space on the disk. if not you have to resize ubuntu to make some space using gparted. you have to use your ubuntu live ...


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I have a simple solution to your difficulty, but I'm having difficulty refraining from venting a simply question which I feel needs asking. Simple Solution: Update Ubuntu without using terminal/bash: Manually open your Ubuntu Update Manager howto: Press your windows key and type "upd" sans quotes and press enter. Click on the "Check" button and the wait ...


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Create an ESP (EFI partition, see this page ), then run Boot-Repair again.


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If your windows 7 running with Enterprise/Ultimate you can use Bitlocker to encrpyt it and for Ubuntu you can use LUKS,


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mahendra@mahendra-K56CA:~$ sudo apt-get upgrade Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done Calculating upgrade... Done The following packages will be REMOVED: linux-image-3.13.0-32-generic linux-image-extra-3.13.0-32-generic 0 upgraded, 0 newly installed, 2 to remove and 0 not upgraded. 6 not fully installed or ...


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This is generally the message given by certain stupid bioses that check the MBR for a partition with the boot flag and refuse to boot the MBR if they don't find one. Looking at your paste, you have the boot flag set on your linux partition, but it is a logical partition and the stupid bios only checks the primary partitions in the MBR. Use fdisk or gparted ...


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First you may want to make a backup of those (pretty sure you said you did, but just double checking). Next, you can try to disable the encryption, install grub, then re-encrypt the Windows partition. Otherwise, you probably shouldn't use grub. What should you use I hear you ask? There are two options, you can either press your boot key and move to the ...


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The best idea will be to use a boot repair disk, just download iso and burn it into USB drive, and it will do all the hard stuff itself for you :) more details at https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair EDIT: if you need direct steps: Download http://sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd/home/Home/ burn it into USB using Universal USB installer (google ...


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Can you access your windows 7? if you can, and you don't insist on repairing grub. You can use Easy BCD. Download the free version of program and install it on your windows 7. It can automatically find your GRUB2 options and add them to windows boot menu. It's very easy, you can figure it out. I've used it many times for similar situations. Works like a ...


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I don't see a way to delete my question, and the options for closing do not apply. The answer to this is either to simply enter the repair function when Live Booting and mark all the drive partitions that were removed as part of md0 and md1 again (swap and RAID5 ext4), or the answer is very complicated and requires data recovery. Neither were enticing. ...


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That's weird you don't see bios/grub menu's on the monitor. Do you have the laptop lid open? Also, it would help if we knew what laptop model it was. Usually you can boot to a live cd even in the state that it's in. Just plug in a monitor with the computer lid closed(but open just enough so you can turn it on) so you get video so you can a least know what ...


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I can get a Grub boot interface by typing: set root=(hd0,5) set prefix=(hd0,5)/boot/grub insmod normal normal And I can then boot into either Windows 8 or Unbuntu. But I really don't want to type that every time I reboot. That was pretty far already, in your UEFI setup you would have just needed to put that into a grub.cfg next to ...


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Try this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVppdkOThCs It is an easy way to boot Ubuntu on an existing windows computer, to try, and very easy to remove it if you don't like it after trying it.


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You could try typing the following into a Windows administrator command prompt: bcdedit /set {bootmgr} path \EFI\ubuntu\grubx64.efi That tells Windows to use Grub as the bootloader. For me, this prevented the system booting straight into Windows automatically, so I could choose between Windows/Ubuntu. What is the error that Boot-Repair gives you? I ...


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I have had the same problem with different HW (acer travelmate 115). I was quite desperate and then found a discussion. The problem was with switching on (booting) and off. I had tried the different ubuntu versions. Finally, I just changed the method of booting in Bios and since then, it worked smoothly without any problem. The right booting method was UEFI ...


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I actually just ran the live cd and installed ubuntu on my new harddrive with all my other hard drives plugged in. I used the advanced options to partition my empty hard drive and installed Ubuntu on it. It did the rest and grub allows me to boot into all os's I have installed.


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Ok, I think I've figured it out. I just followed the instructions on the screen that Boot-Repair prints after it's finished (I tried to post an image but don't have enough reputation). Anyway, I first tried changing the boot order and that didn't work (the only option it showed in the BIOS for HDD boot was Windows EFI boot). So, I tried the typing the ...


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Is secure boot turned on in your BIOS settings? Maybe you have secure boot turned on in your BIOS - it is actually a feature in UEFI based systems that keeps your boot safe from infections, editing etc. Try turn this off in your BIOS settings (On HP laptops it is usually F10 -> System configurations -> boot settings). Check this link: ...


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Since Lubuntu appears to have been installed to the secondary drive successfully, you could try running Boot-Repair to (nearly) automatically fix problems with it not booting right. It's help.Ubuntu.com help/wiki page is here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair and it should be able to do: Boot-Repair is a simple tool to repair frequent ...


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The fact that Lubuntu isn't visible from Windows is normal. Lubuntu uses EXT4 by default, which Windows can not or refuses to read. (Although there are EXT drivers like Ext2FSD). If you don't need to access the Lubuntu partition, leave it. Since you installed Lubuntu on a completely different drive, you also have to tell your BIOS to boot from this drive. ...


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Using the .run file will crash your system. Just install the package sudo apt-get install nvidia-331 The "Additional Drivers" menu can't recognise a lot of hardware so that means nothing. The Ctrl+Alt+F1 should have been working. It is a separate problem for you to solve after you deal with drivers.


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On installation, choose the Soomething else option to open the advanced partitioning tool. Make a separate partition for /boot (500 MB in size is enough): and another one for root: You can make a separate partition for /home for your data and settings and also one for swap if you want to use hibernation on Ubuntu. Before continuing to install, you ...


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I don't see a big problem with MBR installations. You would overwrite the GRUB code in MBR with the one from Arch and load Arch's grub.cfg instead of Ubuntu's. Both ideally should be in /boot/grub/grub.cfg on their respective root partitions, so that every OS has it's own grub.cfg that it can maintain independently. To jump to the configuration of the other ...


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Assuming you're not using UEFI, and I see no reason as to why you should be. Also assuming you didn't set it up in some fancy pancy way originally, then yes, the first option is the correct one. By selecting /dev/sda it will be installed to the MBR of /dev/sda, which a BIOS should be able to boot.


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I have a similar issue on Ubuntu 14.04, but my KBd freezes. (KBd is crummy USB as my compy doesn't support PS/2 (stupid engineers)) cause of issue: update what I did to work around it was on boot (just before the issue), I have a selection screen which allows me to select the advanced options for boot. the next screen shows me a list of linux versions with ...


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After installing, start it by typing: grub-customizer & on an X terminal. It will take care of showing you the gksudo prompt. When it's started, you can pin it to the dock using right click on its dock icon (Unity, Cairo-dock, Docky...). On my Ubuntu 14.04.1, Grub-customizer does not put its icon in System Tools. Anyway, it does work. If it still ...


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I starting my computer and ubuntu loaded without any boot loader. So I searched in internet and the only fix I understand was with the boot repair application. I suppose this actually meant Ubuntu did not boot? After installing ubuntu, using something else option and installing it on a different disk than windows 8 , That is not a very accurate ...


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Try using super-grub http://www.supergrubdisk.org/ Just install it on a usb and boot it (you can use YUMI or Universal Usb Installer), it will automatically find the O.S. installed. Once it boots do: Detect Any OS and that's all Hope it helped


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Actually, I met many trouble while installing 13.04 on Samsung NP905S3G-K04 (here: Ubuntu 13.04 display problem (Samsung ATIV Book 9 Lite)). But did not know "all those problems are already gone" by 14.04 (but new pc is NP905S3G-K08). So, what I did? I just simply used default installer that says "Erase disk and install Ubuntu". But additionally checked ...


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It actually is possible. Before I continue, these instructions are meant for blank EFI System Partitions (ESP) and will probably ovewrite existing files, or not work as expected. At least make backups! Add an ESP to an existing installation with MBR You need to follow these instructions from another installation or live media. Install the ...


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For each bad block number, first use dd to verify that it is bad ( and you didn't make some mistake somewhere ): sudo dd if=/dev/sda1 skip=##### count=1 of=/dev/null iflag=direct bs=1024 If that comes back with an error, then you are looking in the right spot.. now it's time to correct it: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sda1 seek=###### count=1 ...


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Well, I found the solution. Apparently, in my computer uefi does not show both boot managers (my previous computer used to do it). When I install Ubuntu his boot loader is set as priority over the Windows boot manager, and grub2 loads and I can choose Windows or Ubuntu. But still, somehow, when I enter the BIOS, uefi restores the priority to Windows. To ...


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It sounds like you need to run update-grub from within Ubuntu, and may need to install/check os-prober See this A. for a little more info, and an option to manually edit the grub.cfg config file http://askubuntu.com/a/12127/129271 After reading updated comments, it sounds like Ubuntu may not be installed correctly after all, so this may not apply...


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Short answer: grub might be broken. You can follow the instructions here to repair it or reinstall it. In a nutshell: you boot from a live (in this case ubuntu) cd/usb mount the partition where grub is installed bind the directories that grub needs access to to detect other operating systems install, check, and update grub Somewhat longer answer: I ...


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Solved. I installed Ubuntu on the HDD, booted there and ran sudo update-grub. Now it works like a charm and I have an extra Ubuntu installation of I need one, or I can delete it if I want to.


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I would advise repeating but in a different manner, providing my assumption is correct and you installed boot-repair internally. Did you run BOOT-REPAIR by installing it under your installation and running it, or by booting your computer to an external boot repair CD. I'm asking because I've had numerous successes using boot repair CDs but the one and only ...


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Mysterio's solution above worked for me. I tried it last night. To provide more detailed step-by-step instructions, here they are: Download the Ubuntu iso. Burn it to a USB flash drive. Ensure your computer boots to USB (this can be done via the BIOS). With your Ubuntu USB inserted, boot up your computer. You will be prompted with Ubuntu asking if you ...


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None of the answers worked for me so I rebooted and used the Boot Repair Disk to fix the problem. This worked. Whew...!


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Try to install the new version of Ubuntu (v. 14.10) and you should solve the problem, because it was wirtten to fix the problem of the UEFI boot introduced with the release of Win 8. Moreover, check the model of your PC and be sure you can do that; for instance, if you own an HP/Compaq it is likely enough you cannot install 2 partitions on your PC cause of ...


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In order to enable the "normal" text start up edit the "/etc/default/grub" and set the option as below GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT= After editing the file, you need your grup to reflect the new changes, sudo update-grub



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