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6

You can use sed, perl and other tools for that. Here are two examples for sed and perl: Use sed: Start a dry run sudo sed 's/^GRUB_TIMEOUT=10$/GRUB_TIMEOUT=2/' /etc/default/grub if it's ok, then sudo sed -i 's/^GRUB_TIMEOUT=10$/GRUB_TIMEOUT=2/' /etc/default/grub from man sed: -i[SUFFIX], --in-place[=SUFFIX] edit files in place (makes ...


4

I have two suggestions... Option #1: Separate ESPs Under EFI, the boot loader resides on "the" EFI System Partition (ESP). I put the word "the" in quotation marks because there's no rule that says you're limited to one ESP. If you create two ESPs on your hard disk, you can use one of them for your first installation and the second ESP for the second ...


4

Run those commands grub> linux (hd0,1)/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda1 grub> initrd (hd0,1)/initrd.img grub> boot Replace hd0 with your hdd number and /dev/sda1 with your partition holding the /boot mainly the dafult will work if you don't have more than one hdd and with default installtion check this for more info When you can boot again you shoulf ...


3

If you have installed without Wubi.exe: At the grub prompt try these commands: set pager=1 ls Now, suppose the output of ls is: (hd0) (hd0,msdos2) (hd0,msdos1), in order to find the linux root filesystem run: ls (hd0,1)/ which should give you all the files/folders in / such as bin/ boot/ cdrom/ dev/ etc/ home/ lib/ etc. Once this is done continue ...


2

Pretty much. EFI-mode booting involves two things: Boot loader files written to the EFI System Partition (ESP) on the hard disk. Pointers to the ESP-based files stored in NVRAM on the motherboard. The intent is that you can install as many boot loaders as you like and provide an order in which the computer should try them. Users should also be able to ...


1

Run sudo update-grub from the terminal.


1

The fact that GRUB starts, and can start Windows, means that GRUB is starting in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode. GRUB cannot switch boot modes (BIOS to EFI or EFI to BIOS), so GRUB must be trying to start Linux in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, too. In other words, EFI support is not your issue. If you try messing with those settings in the firmware, or make EFI-related ...


1

To hide the grub menu follow the steps: In the terminal, type: sudo gedit /etc/default/grub Find the line that says: GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=false and change it to GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true Save and close the file. Run sudo update-grub Try and post back if there are any errors.


1

Here is a generic one: sudo sed -i.bak 's/^\(GRUB_TIMEOUT=\)[0-9]\+$/\12/' /etc/default/grub Replace 2 (after \1) with any value you want to put. s/OLD/NEW/ is the substitution pattern for sed. i.bak will edit the file /etc/default/grub in place, keeping the original file backed up as /etc/default.grub.bak. If you don't want a backup just use -i. We ...


1

I am running 14.04LTS on an ASUS M51AC with an Nvidia 625GT OEM. I found that in addition to the accepted answer, I needed to also add the line: GRUB_GFXPAYLOAD="keep" to /etc/default/grub.


1

I got the Dell XPS 13 (9343 model) from work, and first thing I did was wipe the disk, and install Ubuntu 14.04. I'm running the latest BIOS, A03. I did alot of tinkering to get the laptop booting. I discovered that the laptop will not work with UEFI booting. You need to disable secureboot, and boot the install media as a legacy device. Then perform a usual ...


1

You need this command: sudo sed 's/.*GRUB_TIMEOUT=10.*/GRUB_TIMEOUT=2/g' /etc/default/grub



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