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11

Run these commands in a terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) wget --no-check-certificate https://download.01.org/gfx/RPM-GPG-KEY-ilg -O - | \ sudo apt-key add - wget --no-check-certificate https://download.01.org/gfx/RPM-GPG-KEY-ilg-2 -O - | \ sudo apt-key add - (source) Then retry sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get --reinstall install intel-linux-graphics-installer ...


10

After searching I found the answer in launchpad. This is an issue with xorg.conf file actually. One can generate the xorg.conf file by using the command sudo aticonfig --initial if one is having the AMD driver. Else one may try sudo nvidia-xconfig if one has nvidia graphic driver. Then one needs to open the xorg.conf file by running the below ...


8

You can use jockey-text to disable and enable Nvidia drivers in Ubuntu. For example: Run jockey-text --list to get the list of available options. Run sudo jockey-text -d xorg:nvidia_304 to remove the 304 driver. Run sudo jockey-text -e xorg:nvidia_304 to enable the same driver. Run jockey-text --help to see the help manual.


6

You can't very easily. AMD hasn't updated the drivers for the AMD Radeon™ HD 4000, HD 3000 and HD 2000 Series they only support up to xserver 1.12 and the kernel up to 3.4. Ubuntu 13.10 is using (at the time of writing on a freshly upgraded system) Xserver 1.14 and kernel 3.11. The last supported version of ubuntu is the 12.04 LTS (without the Quantal ...


6

First open a terminal using ctrl + alt + T. Then type in the command: sudo apt-get install nvidia-current After it's installed, reboot. Mouse sensitivity can be adjusted by going to System Settings > Mouse & Touchpad and dragging the Pointer speed slider. You can find the System Settings Application in the launcher at the left of the screen or ...


5

I didn't see any errors in the Xorg.0.log file the radeon driver seems to work well so try to create a Modeline for the unsupported resolution. Open a terminal with Ctrl+Alt+t and type: cvt 1366 768 It should return: # 1368x768 59.88 Hz (CVT) hsync: 47.79 kHz; pclk: 85.25 MHz Modeline "1368x768_60.00" 85.25 1368 1440 1576 1784 768 771 781 798 -hsync ...


5

After a serious bit of Googling I came across this post: The only purpose of this file is to be later in the link order than (nvidia's) libGL, thus being initialized by the dynamic linker before it, allowing it to set __GL_YIELD=NOTHING soon enough for libGL to notice it. Given that the quote is from a certain M-Graesslin, Martin is the chief ...


5

This is a bug (LP #1214508). You can switch using: sudo prime-select intel sudo prime-select nvidia Also, Bumblebee is still supported so you can install it if you prefer. You'll have to remove nvidia-prime then as you can't use both.


4

There are a few GUI tools available to control and monitor AMD open-source graphics under Linux but none of them are as easy to use or install as AMD's CCC: DriConf - GUI for controlling the direct rendering settings (OpenGL) of all open-source drivers. Pretty hard to use and hasn't been updated since 2006. Phoronix has an overview and comparison to AMD's ...


4

sudo gedit /etc/default/grub find this line: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" and change it to: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash acpi_backlight=vendor" and then: sudo update-grub That works for my HP ProBook. Here is where i found the solution: http://www.techjail.net/solved-brightness-problem-in-ubuntu-12-04-precise-pangolin.html


4

As you get the following error: Error: alternatives are not set up properly You may try to set the alternatives yourself. When I switch to Intel I see: update-alternatives: using /usr/lib/nvidia-331-prime/ld.so.conf to provide /etc/ld.so.conf.d/x86_64-linux-gnu_GL.conf (x86_64-linux-gnu_gl_conf) in manual mode update-alternatives: using ...


4

The solution to this issue is to install intel graphics driver. Here's How: Goto this link and download the .dep package suitable for your OS version (eg. Linux Graphics Installer for Ubuntu* 13.04, 64-bit) Install the signatures listed on the above link (warning there are two types - one for Ubuntu and another one for Fedora) Double click on the .dep ...


4

+ means that the Intel graphics card is being used. Your Nvidia graphics card is still powered on (see Pwr, if it was off, then it reads Off). By installing Bumblebee, it will power off the Nvidia graphics card and thereby extending your battery life. You can optionally run programs on the nvidia graphics card using the optirun program. By not installing ...


4

Install mesa-utils, that might work. sudo apt-get install mesa-utils it worked in my case.read this question posted by me before installing mesa-utils after installing mesa-utils mesa-utils is just not there in ubuntu 12.10.doesn't really matter.


4

Inkscape is the vector graphics application of choice for most Linux users (and a lot of Windows users too).


4

(1) Get Modeline for your desired resolution Use cvt. Here is an example for 1280x1024 resolution. Note that the third parameter (frequency) is optional. If your owner's manual specifies a refresh rate frequency, you may use that as input to cvt, or you can just leave it blank to keep things simple. $ cvt 1280 1024 60 The output will look something ...


4

For anyone else that runs into this problem, it doesn't appear to have anything to do with the graphics driver, see https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/policykit-desktop-privileges/+bug/1240336. To fix, run: sudo pam-auth-update --force and reboot. This fixes numerous other problems (unable to mount flash drives, no sound, can't run software ...


4

You do not have enough RAM in your HP Pavilion ze1210 laptop to install Ubuntu 12.04, and as a result you are getting visual artifact errors. Ubuntu 12.04 requires at least 384MB of RAM, but according to Google your laptop has only 256MB of RAM. Xubuntu, which is a lightweight version of Ubuntu, requires 512MB RAM, so you cannot install Xubuntu either. So ...


3

It's now under All Settings > System > Software & Updates > Additional Drivers


3

To tell if your graphics card is in use you must run the following command: glxinfo | grep OpenGL. If it says Gallium 0.4 on llvmpipe, then it's using your CPU instead of your GPU. If it's says it's using the Intel GPU, then you'll want to disable that in the BIOS and make sure your video cable is connected to your GPU. Radeon HD 8570M is a GCN/RadeonSI ...


3

The official Intel Linux Graphics Installer is now no longer supported for 12.04 (support for 13.04 will end when 13.10 is released). Near the bottom of this link, it is said that: Ubuntu* 13.04 was released in late April 2013. Support for Ubuntu* 12.04 effectively ended when the Intel® Linux* Graphics Installer version 1.0.1 was released (20 May ...


3

You can use glxinfo for information about your driver and OpenGL. Run glxinfo | grep OpenGL for info about your driver and OpenGL. You can use lspci for info about your PCI devices (so, VGA too). Use lspci -v -s `lspci | awk '/VGA/{print $1}'` for info about you video card.


3

Your xorg.conf has two device sections: Section "Device" Identifier "aticonfig-Device[0]-0" Driver "fglrx" BusID "PCI:1:0:0" EndSection Section "Device" Identifier "intel" Driver "intel" Option "AccelMethod" "uxa" EndSection This is causing your machine to attempt to load both the fglrx and the intel ...


3

UPDATE As of Jan 30, 2014, the bug seems to be fixed. With the latest drivers from oibaf's PPA, there are no graphic glitches in Chrome. Are you using oibaf's ppa with latest graphics drivers? Looks like there's a bug introduced in recent Mesa builds: Bug 73978 - Intel driver breaks hardware accelerated flash on Chrome (supposedly related to Flash ...


3

They're not necessarily. They spec-ed out frame rates on a more minimal linux (Ubuntu without Unity to take weight off the video card) and Left4Dead2 had BETTER frame rates on linux. It's my understanding TF2 runs on the same engine, so in theory if you were running something like XFCE instead of Unity it would have better frame rates on the same ...


3

I have ubuntu 13.04 64 bit and same problem: Nvidia GTX 750ti and no boot. I solve by following these steps: go on nvidea driver download I have get NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-334.21.run put it in a folder you remember (your home) and make it executable (chmod u+x ./NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-334.21.run) sudo apt-get purge nvidia* sudo apt-get purge ...


3

I solved this problem sometime back, by. 1) Upgrading to latest kernel and headers : http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/linux-3.8.y.z-review/2013-09-21-raring/ 2) And getting the latest ATI proprietary driver : http://support.amd.com/us/gpudownload/linux/Pages/radeon_linux.aspx 3) Followed by sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade, ...


3

Following link points to the same issue: ubuntu 12.04 - intel hd4600 haswell graphics issue Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise) uses older kernel, while better support of Intel HD4600 was added into later kernels. It should be solved in Ubuntu 13.04 kernel and command bellow allows to use Ubuntu 13.04 kernel in 12.04 Ubuntu. Install Raring (13.04) kernel and x-server ...


3

No. You appear to have an Intel graphics card. Nvidia drivers only apply for Nvidia cards. Intel graphics drivers are supported by the kernel very well, without the need for any additional driver.


3

In those case, you would try following two methods: 1. Try install the fourth point update to Ubuntu 12.04 LTS. If you are in use of this, skip to 2. Ubuntu 12.04.4 features a new version of the Ubuntu kernel, version 3.11, and matching X.org stack, aimed at providing existing LTS users with improved support for ‘a wider variety of hardware’ including ...



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