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That is normal! Disk partitioning changed a while back to aligning partitions on 1MB boundaries (which improves performance on some modern hard disks and RAID arrays; IBM has an in-depth article on it). Logical partitions require one sector prior to each defined partition for a necessary data structure. If you do not want them: change the alignment ...


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Found workaround: At first, create ext3 instead of ext4 partitions by GParted. Than format ext3 as ext4. Do not use formatting at all during installation. Works!


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Why not? Yes There was, it's parted. you can use it in terminal. just install Gparted with following the command and then use it in terminal by running parted sudo apt-get install gparted GParted is a graphical (plus) front end to the libparted library used by the Parted project. If you want to use the command line then use parted instead (note: no g in ...


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Ntfsprogs are included in the package ntfs-3g. To install it run: sudo su apt-get install ntfs-3g ntfs-config To repair the file system must use ntfsfix. Ntfsfix is a utility that fixes some common NTFS problems. Ntfsfix is NOT a Linux version of chkdsk. It only repairs some fundamental NTFS inconsistencies. To run it: sudo su ntfsfix <options> ...


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You might try zeroing out the drive as mentioned in the comments by running... # dd count=1 bs=512 if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdx && sync ... where sdx is the drive you're wanting to format. BE VERY CAREFUL TO ENSURE THAT YOU ARE DOING THIS AGAINST THE RIGHT DRIVE! Then create a new partition table... # cfdisk /dev/sdx # mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdx1 # e2label ...


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You need to boot from a live DVD, set up an internet connection, open a terminal and download the script. After downloading the script into a ~/Downloads directory you can use... sudo ~/Downloads/bootinfoscript This will create a RESULTS.txt in the same directory holding all the information the script collected. Source bootscript help (link has more ...


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Note these lines: /dev/sdb5 6.9G 6.3G 236M 97% / /dev/sdb1 138G 130G 8.7G 94% /media/randy/New Volume /dev/sda1 75G 48G 27G 64% /media/randy/F440B04040B00B7E The first line is important. That shows how much space your Ubuntu installation has in its root partition. As you can see, it has very little (not that it had much to ...


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A certain amount of disk space will be reserved for the: root user so that that user will always be able to function even if regular users are erroring because of no space. A secondary reason for the reservation is that the file-system itself requires a certain amount of free space to operate correctly. This is related to why Linux file-systems do not need ...


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No, you will not damage your drive (unless you have bad sectors). Think of LVM as a partition that can hold other partitions. You can delete LVM the same way as you delete any partition. It's perfectly safe. I would recommend re-formatting the entire drive to NTFS, anyways.


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You can't do it while your partitions are mounted, so as alluded to: download the GParted ISO burn it to a disc and then boot off of that. It will allow you to resize your partitions to your heart's content. Be warned: as with any low-level disk operations there is always the possibility of data loss so if there is anything important you have that you ...


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First a little background. You seem to have two physical hard drives in your computer, sda and sdb. These are each split into separate partitions. Based on your df output, sda is the 24GB HD and sdb the 750. The sdb2 partition is mounted at /media/blah/534E-B317. Since this is not a standard mount point, I am assuming you have set it up yourself and that it ...


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Let's split the problem into two parts Verify if you have the swap partition Verify if your swap partition is actually used. ad 1) Partition /dev/sda7 was the most probably supposed to be the swap partition. Most probably it somehow got damaged, as otherwise filesystem would be recognized as swap. ad 2) Command free shows you how much swap you have ...


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As an alternative to using a live CD you can simply attach your storage device to another computer. As an auxiliary storage device you will be able to do anything to your auxiliary storage device's boot partition that your partition editor will allow you to do.


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The answer to your question can be found in this post. You'll need to boot a liveCD/USB in order to re-size a system partition, and the Ubuntu 14.04.1 LiveCD/USB image comes with GParted. Click on the partition you wish to expand, then click the orange arrow to expand it. If another partition exists, you may need to delete it. To ...


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Just zero out the drive and create a new partition table. Zeroing the Drive: sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/mmcblk0 To create a new parition table, simply use GParted or a similar tool.


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I'd try good old fdisk and see if that can create the partition. I'd also use dmesg to see if there are any disk IO errors appearing to indicate that perhaps it's not been able to write. What's the disk - is it a normal USB flash drive or something special?


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On the top bar of Gparted there is tab called "Device", it has the option called "Create Partition Table", or maybe you can try using any other partioning tool, "Disks" comes installed with ubuntu 14.04


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There are several possibilities here. First off, is the current system bootable (Win. 7-8)? -If so, you may need to boot into the current OS, then "Restart" into the Ubuntu install medium. -If not, the volume may be locked (encrypted), try to mount the volume. In the case you are able to mount the volume in RW "Read/Write" mode, try GParted again. If all ...


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Test gdisk. It is available in Ubuntu Trusty Tahr 14.04.1 Live Iso. Open a terminal. Execute: sudo su gdisk /dev/sd? The gdisk program employs a user interface similar to that of Linux's fdisk, but gdisk modifies GPT partitions. It also has the capability of transforming MBR partitions or BSD disklabels into GPT partitions. Like the original fdisk ...


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Yes, you can abort dd. Just go to the terminal where dd is running and press Ctrl+C. Aborting dd will not roll things back to the way they were before dd started writing a stream of data to the disk. But that's fine, because you don't need that. If your goal is just to clear out all the partitions on the disk and make a new partition table, you can do ...


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In summary, a. Install the Windows OS pointing to the extended partition (formatted for Windows used) b. Configure either OS' boot loader (run boot repair) c. Enjoy (Grub will now give you 2 OS options to load upon boot) Regardless of what I said, you can see tons of tutorials on how to do this, either Ubuntu first or Windows first. Here is an example of ...


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If your motherboard offers this, there is generally a Hard Drive setting in the BIOs that will allow you to change the setup from IDE to RAID. Once you have made that change, you should be able to configure RAID but you would need to make sure that your motherboard supports SATA RAID or something similar, depending on your setup.


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If you need absolutely to do it from the liveusb then choose something else then select that large partition as the root partition / and use the same username and password and it should just save your home folder and documents, but it will not retain packages in any way reliably.


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If you have internet then go into a terminal and run sudo do-release-upgrade and it will upgrade from 12.04 to 14.04.1 or whatever the latest update is with no data loss or changed settings.



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