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Disk Management has some restrictions. You can only shrink a partition or volume up to half of its free space, and you can only extend a partition having contiguous unallocated space to the right of it. Disk management cannot extend a basic partition using an unallocated space to its left. You can use a third party disk manager software, such as aomei ...


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Firstly, you can not work with mounted partitions. Since you are trying to modify the partition on which Ubuntu is installed, you can't do this from your installed OS as you cant unmount the partition. So what you have to do is: Create a live USB/CD and mood into Ubuntu Live In Gparted you start from the live environment, unmount the partition. If the ...


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If you don’t create a separate home partition while installing Ubuntu, you don’t have to reinstall Ubuntu from scratch. To migrate to a separate home partition after installation, you’ll have to create a new partition (which may require resizing your existing partitions), copy the files from your existing home directory to that partition, and tell Ubuntu to ...


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First of all you need to boot from Ubuntu LiveCD to be able to move Ubuntu partitions. You see that now they are locked with "key" sign. After that you will be able to move all partitions. But do not mount them in Nautilus, otherwise they will be locked again. But you can unmount partitions using right-click in Gparted. But you may have trouble with ...


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Have you tried using the dd command? It's a low level disk command, which means it can be very dangerous if you type incorrectly, so proceed with caution! You will need an Ubuntu live CD or USB to boot from, or an Ubuntu installation on another disk, and you need to know the device name for your SSD, eg /dev/sda. It's really important that you get the ...


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In principle (without actually seeing your partition layout) you should be able to simply extend the Ubuntu partition using the unallocated space. This process ought to be perfectly safe. However, in real life, nothing is guaranteed. Why not use disk imaging software (e.g. Macrium Reflect Free Edition for Windows, Clonezilla for Linux) to make a backup of ...


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This is normal, formatting will always use up some space. For example, my 2TB HDD is recognised as 1.819 TB. This is for a couple of reasons, the first being the manufacuturer lies about the volume (they will say 1 TB is 1000 MB, not 1024, and so on down). This means my 2 TB HDD is actually 2,000,398,934,016 bytes. This translates to 2,000,398,934,016 / ...


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If you don't mind to reinstall, I propose to reinstall instead of dealing with Gparted and all those partitions. Boot into Ubuntu Installation media. This can be either CD or USB stick. Start the installation. Proceed to Step 4 and choose "Something else": You will see your disk as /dev/sda Click "New Partition Table..." You will see that you have free ...


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You can find information on Dual Booting Windows and Ubuntu here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/WindowsDualBoot It is recommended that you first install Windows and then Ubuntu. Also, Ubuntu gives you an option to create a new partition table, when you install. You can also find detailed installation instruction here: ...


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Especially if you are moving and/or resizing existing partitions, make sure you backup all important data in case it is lost or damaged. Firstly, if you are running Gparted from a installed Ubuntu, you can't resize the partitions on which it is installed (it can unmount other partitions though), so you need to use a live disk (explained here). Then you can ...


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I tried to install Ubuntu 15.04 on an Acer Aspire-E15 laptop which has the preinstalled Windows 8.1 and had no Linux before. My first reboot after finishing the Ubuntu installation still automatically went to Windows 8.1 without any clue. The following are the steps I used to solve my problem and may also be useful to those people who want to get the ...


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The message about the missing NTFS files and the blinking cursor after the successful formatting of the partition both point toward the fact that you're not booting from the Ubuntu Live CD / DVD but from the hard drive instead. Most recent laptops (or laptops using a recent enough BIOS) usually have a dedicated key to choose the boot device upon startup ...


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There may be a couple options you can go with, but first I would be sure to check the partitions again. If you boot your computer up using Ubuntu on a live USB, and open GParted what do you see as partitions? Normally on a Windows machine you will see the following: /dev/sda - /dev/sda1 ntfs xGiB /dev/sda2 ntfs xxxGib ...


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You're extremely lucky not to have lost any data... If I were you, I would: Take a file back-up of all my files, delete the partition and then re-create the partition and restore the files. For more info read here for user type 4.


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Try this: Boot with a live DVD/USB. Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: $ sudo -i # apt-get update # apt-get install --reinstall gparted # umount /dev/sda7 # umount /dev/sda6 # umount /dev/sda5 # umount /dev/sda3 # gparted Now from gparted, you can add the unallocated space to the extended partition /dev/sda3. Later, you can increase the size of ...


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Are you saying those unallocated spaces have some partitions in-between? If yes - yo need to move them close to each other. In "gparted", the graphical interface for parted, there is a way to drag partition edges to move/resize them. If you have multiple versions, you may need to boot into another one to move the first one's partition ;-). Or boot from the ...


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Write zeros to the usb stick with terminal if you have another machine with Ubuntu. It will wipe the partition sudo shred -v /dev/sda or sdb etc.


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I don't partition memory sticks. I fixed the not recognizing the memory stick problem this way. Using Startup Disk Creator to make a boot-able memory stick works OK as long as you don't try to Erase the memory stick. The memory stick looses its FAT32 table if you Erase, making it unrecognizable to the OS. I could not find an App on Ubuntu 15.04 to re-format ...


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If you have a good backup everything is safe. There is one thing you should know. Your home folder has all your "user configured" stuff in it. When you restore your home folder, if you want a true "fresh" install, do not copy over the entire folder. Only copy over what you need. For example don't copy back ~/.config instead copy only what you actually see ...


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It probably really depends on your setup. I have done similar backups before and it worked out fairly well (save the home folder, reinstall Ubuntu, move home folder back). I'm no expert on Linux/Ubuntu, but I would imagine that some program dependencies might become an issue (you might have to reinstall/configure some things). Overall, I would say it is ...


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It looks like /deb/sda2 is an extended partition. It can contain multiple logical partitions. In your case you can increase size of /dev/sda2 and create some more logical partitions in it, or create a new primary partition. You need to consider that you can have only one extended partition and no more than 4 primary partitions (including extended).


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Unfortunately, you are using LVM, so this is not just as simple as resizing a partition in gparted. What you are seeing in gparted is not a plain partition but an LVM physical volume. This is an area of space on the disk reserved for LVM to put its logical volumes. Then, inside those logical volumes are the partitions your system uses. However, gparted ...


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You shouldn’t have any issues, the issues occur when you have to dual boot an EXISTING Windows 8 OS and older Ubuntu versions. But if you are using 15.04 and you are installing Windows 8 after that there really should not be any issues or special procedures that you have to follow. You just may want to make a Ubuntu Livecd/flashdive and a boot repair cd/usb ...


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Deleting Windows caused your Master Boot Record / GPT to behave aberrantly. You need to fix it so that it can locate the appropriate OS while booting. Burn Ubuntu Live USB / DVD (You can do it via Unetbootin). Boot the machine in Live Ubuntu environment. Open up terminal and type sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair; \ sudo apt-get ...


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My suggestion is to try: Plug your external hdd. Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it: sudo -i fdisk -l Suppose your disk is /dev/sdg, continue running: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdg bs=1M gparted By gparted create a GPT partition table. If your PC is (U)EFI aware via the BIOS, create a first partition EFI bootloader (ef00 EFI System) 500 Mg If ...


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Given your current state, and assuming the amount of free space is what you want to add to Windows, you must: Move your Ubuntu partition (/dev/sda5) to the right. Shrink your extended partition (/dev/sda4) to its smallest possible size. (You must shrink it from its left side.) Grow your Windows partition (/dev/sda2) to fill the free space. Unfortunately, ...


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At least I found what the trigger for this is: Gnome disk utility /usr/bin/gnome-disks. If a standby timeout or APM is activated for any drive, it causes the launchers for all unmounted partitions to be shown. This misbehavior was recently introduced.


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My guess is that you had a Debian image on your hard disk (either in a file or written "raw" to a partition) and that it just happens to have been stored where your /dev/sda2 now begins. Because /dev/sda2 is basically just a placeholder for your /dev/sda5, which is swap space, it could be that enough of the original disc image remains on the disk to confuse ...



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