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Just press the "close" button!


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Update: I've received my replacement SSD but was still experiencing the same issues. It turned out that in my BIOS (gigabyte fx990 ud3 rev 4.0) OnChip SATA Port4/5 Type was set to IDE instead of as SATA type. Only the Samsung 840 EVO had the problem being run as IDE.


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By far the best way to dual boot (or triple or quadruple boot) a computer is to follow this sequence: (1) download and burn to CD a standalone version of gparted. (2) Use that to partition your disk as desired, say 75 GB for Windows, 75 GB for Linux, 75 GB for another version of Linux, and 75 GB for pure data to be read/written by both Win 7 and Linux. ...


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Ouch. Sorry, with the possible exception of the make-believe computer tricks on CSI, when a partition is deleted or changed (to a different type,) the data that was there is gone. You will have to do a fresh install of Windows. FYI, to streamline things a bit, I would use a live Linux disk and do a full wipe of the HDD using "gparted" ("disks"), and then ...


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Right click on the swap partitions and select swapoff. This will unlock the extended partition and let you resize/move.


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Just as Fabby said, there is usually no need in extra partitions outside the Ubuntu file system. The partitions you have look totally well for a standard Ubuntu installation. You have a big partition as file system root (/) for Ubuntu and a small extended Partition containing one logical swap volume. There is nothing left from Win7 on this hard disc! But ...


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Create a Primary partition with ext4 file system Right-click on unallocated USB (/dev/sdb) and choose first option new ( insert ) Choose File system type ext4 and click Add. see image below. Now complete this pending operation using green right icon above to the disk information panel. Note: Sometimes you can get an error, but don't panic, unplug and ...


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the short answer is that ecryptfs is a filesystem encryption and only encrypts files not partitions, so it should be safe to resize the partition, but make a backup first! I'm flagging this as a duplicate, because this question has been asked before.


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Open a new terminal session ( Ctrl + Alt + T ) and type the following command : sudo grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg Reboot the system. Windows must have appeared in the grub menu now.


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I've most often seen gparted used for partitioning & formatting, it's quite robust & should give you more detailed error messages than "there were errors." I wouldn't assume the usb were bad just yet. You could use a terminal to check the drive's filesystem too (not really necessary just to repartition / reformat) with fsck /dev/sdb1 probably. It ...


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You are using Logical Volumes and GParted doesn't know about them. Use the Logical Volume Manager's UI: system-config-lvm to manage this kind of volume instead of gparted.


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Use Gparted from live CD and then Unmount as u were saying becoz u cannot unmount the disk from which you are using currently so you have unmount from Gparted bootable pendrive or you change the partition as you want. Kindly notify me if you face any more problem


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I made my GParted live USB from Ubuntu by following the instructions from the GParted Live on USB website at gparted.org. I used the method described under the heading: GNU/Linux Method C: UNetbootin. Install UNetbootin from the Ubuntu Software Center. Download the GParted Live iso file. Run the UNetbootin application, and follow the instructions in the ...


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Firstly I cannot get that which software is installed in your laptop. Download GParted ISO image Then download Unetbootin or Tuxboot to make bootable pendrive. After installing GParted on USB just reboot and go into BIOS set up (Usually we go into BIOS set up by pressing F2 ,F8, F10 when company logo appear (Buttons Depend on your lappie company) After ...


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In addition to Perumal93's advice, also make sure you run sudo grub-install /dev/sda after you delete Windows in gparted and before you reboot. Replace "sda" with another name if you need to. fdisk -l will show you which hard drive is 'dev/sda' and which one is 'dev/sdb'. You should choose the one that has your Linux partition. Also, make sure you do ...


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I did some reading and found that this issue was more common than I thought. Even though it may not be optimal, I just ended up switching my comp to boot in CMS (or legacy/bios/whatever) and reinstalled the disc in that mode. It works fine now. Thank you two for your help.



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