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I think you'll want to use clonezilla. From the clonezilla website: Clonezilla is a partition and disk imaging/cloning program similar to True Image® or Norton Ghost®. It helps you to do system deployment, bare metal backup and recovery. This will allow you to very simply create a .iso from a partition (I'm not too sure about multiple partitions but ...


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Create a new file which is exactly 16gb size. fallocate -l 16G sixteen.img Create a file-system within it. mkfs.vfat sixteen.img Mount it. mkdir sixteen sudo mount sixteen.img sixteen This will open a nautilus window with your newly mounted image file. Now insert your SD card. It will automatically mount and open a second nautilus window. Copy your ...


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The crash during a partition merge likely damaged the file system. That's why you should create backups beforehand. The easiest “fix” is to re-format the partition, if you don't care about any data that may be recoverable. If you're lucky, you can salvage most of the data with fsck, but you should create a raw copy of /dev/sda5 and work on the image, in ...


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Try this: Launch parted as superuser: in a terminal: sudo parted /dev/sdd (you will be prompted for your sudo password) Create a new partition table: in parted: mklabel gpt Exit: in parted: q And see if now gparted is able to handle the device


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Typically this means that there was an error reading from the disk. In other words, you have a bad sector. You should check dmesg or /var/log/kern.log to see if there are more detailed error messages bout the drive, as well as the SMART health in the disk utility, and if the drive has many reallocated or pending bad sectors, you need to back up what you ...


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To repartition your disk, the partitions you want to change (every operation except enlarging) have to be unmounted. This means that the running OS is not accessing them. You can recognize a mounted partition by the key symbol next to its name in gParted and you will see that both of your partitions (mount points / and swap) are mounted. So it is ...


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My 'active distro' occupied another drive, I just wanted to get rid of the Fedora LVM - fedora doesn't play nice with other distro's destroyed my 'grub2' list and wouldn't allow any other distro to boot, so needed to 'get rid' lvscan + lvremove as sudo worked a treat $ sudo lvscan ACTIVE '/dev/fedora_localhost/swap' [7.81 GiB] inherit ACTIVE ...


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Resize sda6, then move it to the right ( this will take a very long time, and if you lose power in the middle your data is lost, so make sure you have an updated backup ), then move sda5 to the right, then move the start of sda2 to the right, and finally you will have free space following sda1 that you can expand it into. To manipulate these partitions ...


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Download the .iso image from here Burn the .iso image using unetbootin In the bios setup set priority to where you burned the image (example usb or dvd) Check the choice 'Install Ubuntu' Follow the instructions given. Note:You should be careful with partitioning.You don't want to mess these things up.


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Your USB stick definitely has a physical defect, so you have to go and replace it. It looks like a memory cell at some position around 3GB has died. This is not repairable at all (especially not by software)! You can see this because the dd command you used should just write 00h (all bits to zero) to every memory cell on your device, without caring about ...


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While installing Ubuntu, I defined swap partition but got same problem and solved like that; -- list blocks root@kerem:~# blkid /dev/sda1: UUID="4e098809-7c30-41b2-99d6-c548c50a3108" TYPE="ext2" /dev/sda5: UUID="f10cb0a9-0310-4318-883c-b38506bc8942" TYPE="swap" /dev/sda6: UUID="f1514d98-d032-49f4-a027-0677cc83dc14" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda7: ...


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/dev/sda5 is a logical partition inside an extended partition (/dev/sda4), while the unallocated space lies outside of that extended partition. You need to resize /dev/sda4 to include the unallocated space first, then resize /dev/sda8. Unfortunately GParted won't let you touch /dev/sda4 (note the key symbol), because some of its children partitions are ...


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Simply freeing up space in windows partition will not give you extra space in ubuntu partition.The space you have freed is currently not utilized by either ubuntu or windows. What you have to do now, is increase the size of Ubuntu partition to add that un-utilized space into the Ubuntu partition. But, as @owang pointed out, you cannot modify a mounted ...


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Are you using the ubuntu partition right now? You cant modify a mounted partition. You have to boot up with a live environment, e.g. Ubuntu from a USB stick to modify the partition.


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There isn't a merge; and anyway, you have sda5 (swap) in between these two. You would have to copy your data from sda6 to sda1, remove sda2-6, expand sda1 & add a new swap partition. Assuming you have space on sda1, otherwise you may need a second (USB?) drive. That said, it is generally recommended to have at least a 3rd partition for /home as well, so ...


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I've had the same problem, both with gparted and fatresize. It seems to be a bug, specifically bug #1313600. In the end, my solution was to format the USB drive manually and not use any move or resize operations for FAT32. FYI, note that using the command-line tool parted to resize/move the partition doesn't work either, as it is not filesystem-aware and ...


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I had the same problem. The issue at my case was that it was formatted as Ubuntu live CD. And instead of listing the mounpoint of the USB itself in /etc/mtab, the Live-Folder within the USB was listed. Therefore, it was impossible to unmount the USB-drive itself. My solution was to remove the mountpoint of the USB with the command $ sudo rm -rf ...


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"Great security comes with great responsibility"... ;-) The conclusion of @user68186 is correct: backup everything and recreate. I would back up everything twice: one system back-up using CloneZilla disk-to-image (will be encrypted as well) and one file backup (please do that one unencrypted to avoid more trouble later on, use your current back-up ...


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Don't forget to set the mount point to "/" then in terminal: sudo update_grub The swap of 4 GB is more than enough if you have RAM >= 8 GB .


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The previous modified volume just needed a boot-repair. I booted into live cd and installed boot-repair. It automatically fixed my issue.



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