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This answer is based on the assumption that you are trying to modify the partition which you are booted off and currently using (/dev/sda1), from what you described. Gparted won't allow you to modify a partition that is mounted and in use. To modify your /dev/sda partitions you can boot from a live CD or other boot media that has Gparted installed on it ...


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In addition to the @bigbadonk420's answer, Instead of doing the following: resize2fs -p /dev/vg_blah/lv_blah 9G lvreduce -L -1G /dev/vg_blah/lv_blah Do: lvreduce -r -L 9G /dev/vg_blah/lv_blah Note the -r which reduces the file system simultaneously and is safe.


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You have to do this in steps, not all at once, and you need to move any free space you want to add next to the partition(s) you want to add space to. First, you need to turn swap off, you can do this from the gparted menu. Next add the free space to the extended partition (sda4) -> apply changes. Then you need to move the swap partition so the free space ...


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Boot into a Ubuntu LiveUSB/CD. Open Gparted and shrink your /dev/sda2/ to have enough space for the Windows installation. Create NTFS storage partition if necessary. Now restart and boot into a Windows installation media in UEFI mode. Assuming that you have a UEFI based system, it would be better to install Windows to an unallocated disk partition. So ...


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No need of commands, use EasyBCD for adding grub again to boot menu. Install windows 7 on a separate drive (Ubuntu previously installed on another drive) After windows installation Ubuntu will not boot. PC will boot into windows automatically. Enter into windows and install EasyBCD for windows Open EasyBCD and select add boot entry. Select grub2 Give any ...


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You are trying to install the wrong version, possibly from a downloaded source. One of the first bad habits you have break coming from windows is downloading software. I know how it can be to be used to downloading an .exe from where ever and running it to install but Ubuntu has a secure repository containing tens of thousands of apps preconfigured for ...


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Partitions need to be aligned on particular boundaries. Although disk data is referred to in 512 byte sectors, modern drives work on much bigger sectors internally. So having a partition boundary that is not aligned to the disk physical page size can have a very serious performance hit. This is especially relevant for SSD drives. These have page sizes of ...


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It is fairly normal to have a few megabytes between partitions (some software do this purposefully, and as some have said, are necessary to have). To remove these few megabytes you will need to move the partitions above the unallocated space down. This will group the unallocated space so that you can combine the space left over into another partition. For a ...


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This seems to be a bug with the particular version of gparted in Ubuntu 14.04. Repeated failures with resizing fat32 partitions using Ubuntu 14.04 is also reported in this Askubuntu question. The solution (for me) is quite simple. Use Ubuntu 12.04 or earlier versions either on another machine or from a liveusb. I was able to shrink fat32 partitions on ...


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I found an answer to my problem. I wasn´t able to shrink the windows partion by more than ≈ 7 GB (I think it´s because Windows won´t let you go under 30 GB free space) in Windows 8.1 Disk management. I therefor downloaded Partition Wizard and used that to shrink my SSD to what I wanted (I shrinked it by 20 GB, leaving me with ≈ 15 GB of free space left on ...


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Have you tried using Windows to resize the partition? I have done this several times with Windows 8.1 and it works very well. It will tell you, if resizing is not possible.


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I think it would be ideal for performance to have your OS installed on the SSD and then file storage on the HDD if that is your setup. However, assuming you don't want to reinstall your OS and just want to use the space on this SSD for files, unmount it in gparted and format it to Ext4. In gparted you can also give it a label, but this can be done later ...


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I went back to the Gparted image in your old question SDA1 almost full. What do i do? These are the steps to increase the size of sda1: Step 1: Backup your data to an external medium. Step 2: Boot from the Live DVD/USB and use the Try Ubuntu without installing option. Disable Swap: Open a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and enter sudo swapoff -a ...


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I'm not 100% positive, but I suspect this is your problem: /dev/sda6 1532825600 1780301823 123738112 83 Linux /dev/sda7 1780301824 1805438975 12568576 82 Linux swap / Solaris Most partitioning tools put at least one empty sector between logical partitions and use that space to store the Extended Boot Record (EBR) that describes the ...


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These instructions worked for me to reformat an 8GB USB flash drive that was made useless after I used dd to write a bootable iso file to the flash drive. I reformatted the flash drive to its original FAT32 format as follows: Remove all of your USB devices except for the 8GB USB pendrive that you want to reformat, so you won't get confused about the device ...


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If you write an file system image onto a medium, the file system won't know, how much space there actually is, so you'll be restricted to its original size, unless you extend it (if the file system type allows it). Additionally, you probably used an image with a ISO 9660 file system, which doesn't support modification at all. If you want to create a ...


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Ok, so Here's what I did :- 1) Booted into a windows system , formatted the usb as fat32. The problem was still as it is although on windows I was able to read/write from the usb. So, I rebooted my system and the usb stick worked as before. I don't know why this happened.


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Flash devices don't last forever. When they fail, they sometimes exhibit symptoms similar to what you're reporting. Although it's worth trying other suggestions here, there's a high probability that your device is simply dead and that you must replace it.


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Run gparted, choose your flash drive, then go to Device -> Create Partition Table and then choose one from thes list, msdos is just fine, then you should be able to create new partition(s).


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It sounds like a permissions problem. A few things I've found can cause this quirky problem: Saving the data from one account/system, and try to add from another? Using a protected name for the folder (such as Documents). That almost always messes with permissions, and locks a user out of the folder or drive. I've found that Gparted is a good tool for ...


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It's impossible to say with certainty without seeing detailed partition table data (as in sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda or sudo parted /dev/sda unit s print. In some cases, though, the FixParts program, which is part of the gdisk package in Ubuntu, can do the job. The FixParts documentation (just linked) describes the details of how to do it. In a worst-case ...


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Warning about the currently most voted answer: To NOT destroy your fresh default installation with LVM option (14.04 Trusty Tahr), 1) read the whole page, 2) delete swap 3) and probably modify the command for "Reduce the size of the logical volume" like this: lvreduce -L -1g /dev/vg_blah/lv_blah I strongly recommend system-config-lvm.


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You seem to have not just only a GPT but also a UEFI installation. In that case there will be no overwritten MBR bootloader, which is what the link in your question is mostly about. I'm pretty sure that machine shipped with Windows 8, so you should have followed the instructions in my answer on How to use manual partitioning during installation? and kept ...


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Before starting please backup your files, because re-sizing and creating partition can lead to loss of data. After that Open Gparted. Select the disk with largest amount of free space and click on "Move/Resize the selected partition" choose how much space you want to allocate to your windows 7 installation. When you are satisfied click on Resize/Move. ...


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The installation of Windows 7 in dual boot has been unambiguously described in the link that you have mentioned in your question. If you want to know how GParted works, check the following steps: To launch gParted you may use either of the methods: the Dash (Ubuntu 11.04 and next): click the Ubuntu logo in the top-left corner of the screen, then type ...


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You just need a free space on hard disk, you can manage partition for your windows 7 OS from the windows OS installer. Use Disks (it's an application) to make a partiton with free space. Notice that you cannot install Win 7 on GPT formatted disks.


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(I know, I know not so much links, right? But hey what can I do, this man needs help!) Hiren's BootCD might have a tool that could help. But before you download take a look at the tools list and make up your own opinion. As a sysadmin such a CD is always in my reach. Here is the list of the MBR tools MBR (Master Boot Record) Tools BellaVista 1.1.0.71 ...


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I was able to expand it using lvextend -L +XG /dev/HOSTNAME-vg/root As seen here


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Try the following to see if ROOT is the owner of your configuration file (this can happen when you use 'sudo' instead of 'gksudo' in launching app with a GUI). find $HOME -not -user $USER -exec ls -lad {} \; In this case use: sudo chown -R %YOUR_USERNAME%:%YOUR_USERNAME% %TARGET_FILE_OR_DIRECTORY% to change configuration files' owner. Cheers


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In the first screenshot, there is a KEY next to the blue square in the third line. That means that the partition is mounted, so theoretically, you ought to be able to access it, and I think you ARE accessing it without realizing it. By giving it the mount point of /home, one of the "homes" of your directory system is that entire partition. I'm guessing it ...


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Click on the folder that is called "home" and then click on your username folder; the partition should be mounted and available here. Open a terminal and type the following command to confirm this: lsblk You should see the partition listed here and it should have a mountpoint listed as well. If no mount point is listed, you need to edit /etc/fstab to ...


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Ok. Thanks to everyone who tried to help. It seems like this had not much to do with ubuntu, and was basically a BIOS bug. Some Gigabyte motherboards write a copy of their BIOS to hard disks immediately when the disks are connected. So, simply by connecting a new HD on the motherboard it is likely that it will be written to, and HPA will be activated ...


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While it's possible to repartition the system from recovery mode with a tmpfs to copy essential system tools to, I really wouldn't recommend it: It's tedious, more error prone, and requires a lot of experience. You'll likely shoot yourself in the foot for something unurgent like increasing swap space. Additionally I presume, that you won't be able to create ...



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