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0

I see no error in the screenshot. That Microsoft reserved partition is used by Windows. Probably it is a recovery partition or so. It is hard to say from your screenshot alone. The red symbol in front of it does not signify a problem here. These particular partitions do not have a recognisable filesystem.


0

I solved it by re-writing the .iso file in the USB correctly using dd (as @oldfred suggested) and then formating it twice again with gparted.


1

The first two answers are incredibly bad advice. Formatting or re-writing the partition table, as suggested in the first 2 answers, does NOT delete the data and the data can be recovered in about 20 minutes. This is because deleting and recreating partition table does not delete data at all. You can recover data even after quick format of partition. It is ...


0

Followed the advise of olfred: See the comments above.


0

You have already given the answer from the beginning. Does the following creates another partition in Linux 300 GB NTFS type - FAT32 and then try to reinstall Windows, I believe we will have no problem.


-1

Você já deu a resposta desde o início. Faz o seguinte cria outra partição no Linux de 300 GB do tipo NTFS - FAT32 e então tenta novamente instalar o Windows, acredito que não terá problema nenhum.


0

Few days ago I tried to install Windows 10 using USB stick, but couldn't because Ubuntu didn't boot it. So, that's a misconception here. Ubuntu won't boot from your USB stick. That has to happen before you boot Ubuntu or any other operating system. First off, not all computers can boot from USB, they need to be sufficiently new to support this (the ...


-1

btw the simplest thing to do is wipe your phone , set your partitions as you want em ( there's a ton of app with android ) , then install ubuntu touch in your pre-set partition .... i mean that's what i would do...


0

this is happening because the volume you gotta shrink or expand is the one u are using ( is mounted ) you better use a Live distro in order to do so....sysresccd ( http://www.sysresccd.org/) basically make a live usb of that distro ....and u will be able to modify your partition ....keep in mind that u can't edit mounted partitions and u can't un-mount ...


1

In order to format a partion as lvm2 pv, gparted needs the package lvm2 to be installed. In a terminal run sudo apt-get install lvm2 Then restart gparted


1

You can not just extend any partition you like. There must be some space at least at one side of the partition. If that is not the case, you need to move other partitions to get this space in the right place. Important note: If you move the left side of linux or Windows boot partition, the system will not boot. You will need to re-install grub.


2

You cannot merge two partitions. You can only delete those partitions and combine them. So here is my opinion: Backup your important data Boot from Live DVD. Delete both the ext4 partitions and reinstall Ubuntu 15.04 You want to keep your files without deleting them, but that is not possible. You are rewriting the partitions. So expectedly, the files ...


0

That's because you're looking in the wrong direction. To see your disk partition information, use sudo fdisk -l /dev/sda. Rather than risking fiddling with disk partitions (although I'll get to that), I suggest that you find out what is using 99% of /boot. See the question and my answer at this post And now, how to risk destroying your disk by ...


3

It looks like your 4GB USB stick is broken. To ensure no one uses a destructive test and just copy-pastes the stuff without reading the explanation, you have to type the next command all in lower-case. WARNING Never use the -w option on a device containing an existing file system. This option erases data! If you want to do write-mode testing ...


0

Open a terminal, sudo -i to become root. Run fdisk or parted, delete all partitions, create a new one. Use the fat32 option for type. Run mksfs -t fat32 /dev/sdb (assuming you haven't moved your USB). Done. If that doesn't work, consider providing details as suggested above. Sometimes cat /dev/zero >/dev/sdb will remove corrupted stuff from USB.


0

I disagree with the comments that you need to perform this operation on a Live CD. You're talking about an external USB drive, not a system drive. You definitely can do this operation from your installed system. If gparted is reporting this error, you might have something wrong with the ntfs partition. You should probably run sudo ntfsresize --info ...


2

Boot from Ubuntu LiveUSB and you will be able to extend the partition in gparted. You cannot extend a partition from inside a working system.


5

Extended partitions are like containers for logical volumes. But unfortunately, you can't just move the whole container. Maybe it helps if you imagine partitions as cardboard boxes. A primary partition is a standard box and logical volumes are like little boxes that have to stay inside an extended partition. Now the interesting thing is how the extended ...


1

The easiest way is to boot from LiveCD and use gparted. Move sda3 left. Extend sda4 left. Move sda5 left. Extend sda6 left. Run in terminal sudo mount /dev/sda6 /mnt sudo chroot /mnt sudo grub-install /dev/sda exit This way you will keep the NTFS partition sda3. But it is not recommended to keep NTFS partitions when you do not have Windows installed. ...


0

Looking at your setup, I believe you are having a MBR disk and therefore am using a extended partition. This is why you were experiencing the problem. The limitation with MBR is that you can't have more than 4 primary partitions. So what is usually done when you want more than 4 partitions on a MBR disk is to create 3 primary partitions, and make the fourth ...


0

Here are some simple steps for you to perform right where you were in the video (assuming you really were booting from live cd/usb and that /dev/sda6 really is the partition you have mounted on /home ). Move /dev/sda3 to the "right" far enough to leave unallocated space between it and /dev/sda2 equal or greater to the amount of space you wish to add to ...


5

https://neosmart.net/wiki/recovering-windows-bootloader/ Following advice from here, I downloaded and created a Windows 10 installer usb (which is free) and repaired the Windows bootloader from the installer command prompt: bootrec.exe /fixmbr bootsect.exe nt60 all /force This allowed me to boot from windows again. I then created an Ubuntu live usb; and ...



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