Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You have to resize the logical volume. First, backup all your important files. lvresize -l +100%FREE -r /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg--root I cannot test here, but it should use all the free space, and -r will auto resize the file system.


1

Here is the general approach you would be taking. You first have to boot into a live Ubuntu environment. To do that, burn an Ubuntu image on a CD/DVD/USB and boot from it as if you're installing Ubuntu but choose "Try Ubuntu" instead of "Install Ubuntu", then open GParted. Right click on sda5 and Delete. So you'll end up with sda6, sda7, followed by a big ...


0

/dev/sda1 is your root partition, which indeed can not be unmounted while Ubuntu is running off of it, because this is where the operating system is. What I usually do in such cases is to boot from a live CD (my favorite is systemrescuecd) and then resize the partition while it is not active.


0

thanks everyone ! I did use Fabby's suggestion and ran chkdsk and there were errors that windows corrected, but it did not solve the issue I had. I've decided that it could be that the pen drive itself is the source of the problem so I replaced it with another pen drive and repeated the steps (formatting to FAT32, installing a bootable live Ubuntu with ...


1

Once a hard drive starts to fail , you will start to have problems. You can continue to use the drive for some time, by re-formatting it, etc as you suggest. The drive may have some life in it, for example, I used a drive like this for over a year. Just make sure you have reliable back ups. Sometimes (rarely) they fail gradually, but eventually the drive ...


1

There are a number of issues which are probably going to make this difficult for you: Traditionally, partitioning software liked to align partitions to logical tracks, so if you have 63 sectors per track, this meant aligning partitions to multiples of 63 sectors. In practice this is a small amount of data much smaller than a megabyte. However, hard ...


-1

I had the same problem yesterday. Ctrl+Alt+T sudo GParted, did the trick


2

You can either go with a swap file, like the answer to the question you link to, or you can add a swap partition. Using a swap file: Command borrowed from #Qasim in Does it make sense to create swap partitions for new installations nowadways? First switch to the root user sudo su Then run the following command mkdir /swap && cd /swap && ...


-1

-> Create a new partition at your unallocated space. -> Remember your new partition's name (should be /dev/sda5). -> Open up a shell -> Type sudo mkswap /dev/sda5 -> Then mount it as swap using sudo swapon -U UUID (Replace UUID with the one you get from blkid /dev/sda5) -> Now edit the FSTAB to automatically mount your new swap sudo nano ...


1

Well the flash has been simply locked by its internal mechanisma, and the manufacturer of the flash just replaced it. So step-by-step navigator follows: I wrote the same letter to the company's support and got the answer in which they said that: Write protection happens to prevent data loss from a potential fault. We recommend to backup your data ...


0

Ubuntu or any linux based os does not recognize unused space in the disk so to install windows insert any bootable pen devices and will installing it will show you the different partition on your disk .From there you can make a new partition and install windows in it.As per as your second question few things that I can tell is first may be your ISO image ...


0

I would advise repeating but in a different manner, providing my assumption is correct and you installed boot-repair internally. Did you run BOOT-REPAIR by installing it under your installation and running it, or by booting your computer to an external boot repair CD. I'm asking because I've had numerous successes using boot repair CDs but the one and only ...


0

If you're using Ubuntu, you can just use Disks (It's installed by default and on liveCD) to create a new partition table by formatting the whole drive. I've never used a Samsung SSD, but sometimes on Intel SSDs updating firmware can solve a lot of issues.


0

Linux's fschk doesn't reliably fix all FAT errors. If you can lay your hands on a Windows machine, do a `chkdsk /f x:" where x: is the drive letter of the USB on that machine and then resize again. If you do not have access to a Windows machine, download FreeDOS.


1

Your filesystem has MBR (Master Boot Record), in MBR maximum partition size is 2TB(tera byte) only, so that's why you are not able to do this. To make the system capable of this, you need to replace your MBR with GPT (GUID Partition Table). It allows you to create one partition up to 2PB(peta byte). To replace you can read this link : How can I ...


0

It is pretty weird but I solved problem (like 75% of it exactly). Here's what I did: I backuped my partiton table by sudo sfdisk -d /dev/sda > sda-backup.txt I created file to edit partition table by sudo sfdisk -d /dev/sda > sda-new.txt I edited my "sda-new.txt" to change partition table and saved it. I swapped off my /dev/sda6 by swapoff /dev/sda6 ...


0

You can't move the partitions that are mounted (the ones with the key icon), and you can't unmount the system you are running. You can unmount the swap drive, but that's not enough. So, you need to boot Linux from a cd or usb drive, then run gparted. The original Ubuntu disk will work, just don't install, but use the feature to try it out without making ...


0

Have you plugged this USB into a modern windows computer? If so, it is quite possible that you have been plagued by the new Microsoft "fix". It is most commonly referred to as the FTDI kill...Microsoft has modified the code from "bad usb" exploit to identify "counterfeit" usb controllers (the chip that controls the usb device) The new "update"(which I ...


0

using sudo fdisk /dev/sdc folow the help, using o option to create a new partition table after that you can use Disk Utility or GPart to format you flashdisk Alternative way: sudo parted -a optimal /dev/sdc mklabel msdos If success, continue to use Disk Utilities Good luck!


0

I know this is not a ubuntu program however https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatter_4/ is confirmed to be very good by most manufacturers and has gotten me out of situations sd card related. Also failing that you may want to do a low level format of the sd


0

I got this hint from http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2084152 Try one or both. Since I have an extended partition containing many logical partitions including swap and boot, I used a USB install of GParted to add the label "lba". I booted into Windows Vista and ran chkdsk /f twice. The first time showed a lot of errors / bad sectors but ...


0

I don't see the unallocated space. But yes, using parted to move your extended partition boundaries and then to recover the partitions inside. note where they are supposed to be.


0

Yes, you should be able to resize your extended partition (just sda4) to include free space on either side of it (adjacent to it), after shrinking/resizing sda3. An extended partition can hold many other partitions, it's like a container for "more than just 4" partitions. I think if you didn't already have an extended partition you would have to delete one ...


0

You have 4 primary partions used .. three ntfs and one extended(extendable). So yes, partion 3 as extended would have been nice. Now, resizing one of the ntfs would leave you with empty space .. if it's adjacent to your extended partition, you could then resize that.


0

Next time. Make sure your PC Stays Plugged in,and that in your power option you configured it to stay awake. go to system settings -> power. Set "Suspend when inactive" to "Don't Suspend"


1

As I said the process was killed. And nothing bad happened, huh ;) That partition has NTFS, so I tried to fix it with command ntfsfix but it didn't help too. Then I loaded Windows 8 and tried to run CHKDSK D: /F in cmd. Finally! That was right solution. But I've lost about 20 Gb of data. Note, this trouble was because of using Acronis Disk Director 11. I ...


1

to do it safely you remove space from DATA using windows (since partitioning using windows' Disk manager is safe). and leave that free space. and boot into live ubuntu using USB/DVD and merge that free space with / using gparted.


0

To be able to extend a partition, you need free space adjacent to it. In your case you would have to move /dev/sda3. This can take a very long time. Extend the extended partition (/dev/sda4) to include the free space. Finally extend /dev/sda5.


0

This is standard practice in many large organisations - you take a "clean" installation with everything set up correctly, then take basically a dump of the entire disk and store that in an image file, then when you deploy a new desktop you deploy from that image file. You can basically do a dd of the whole drive, including all partitions, with, say dd ...



Top 50 recent answers are included