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This is typical and most users see this message. You can safely ignore it. See the answer here Partition does not start on physical sector boundary?


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Wait for somebody else's opinion, but here's mine. Notice this from your log: Drive: sda _____________________________________________________________________ Disk /dev/sda: 512.1 GB, 512110190592 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 62260 cylinders, total 1000215216 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / ...


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Simple fix. Open a terminal, and run: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g sudo reboot sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdb3 #Replace accordingly


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You can't "merge" partitions in Gparted. You can create, delete, or resize them. There was no need to format swap partition to ext4. You need to unmount your sda6 partition, delete sda5 and sda7, then expand the sda6. Consider leaving space for a swap partition and do not forget to add the new UUID of it to /etc/fstab. Note: After you move the start of ...


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When trying to resize internal disk linux partition ALWAYS use a LiveCD/USB, because all internal partitions must be unmounted (not blocked by the installed Ubuntu). You are doing that, which is very good. In GParted, right-click on the swap partition and choose swapoff. You can't resize or move it if it's not off (unused). Then move it out of the way, ...


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The message about the kernel using the old table, appears because you are trying to modify partitions on a disk that's in use by the system. Either boot from a LiveCD and make the changes you want on your disk or, as Rinzwind said, do a clean install. If this disk is not your system disk, you can also unmount it before you start making this kind of changes....


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Answer by OP I followed the wiki TestDisk 7.0, Data Recovery Utility, April 2015 Christophe GRENIER <grenier@cgsecurity.org> Disk /dev/sdc - 124 GB / 115 GiB - CHS 15102 255 63 Partition Start End Size in sectors No partition found or selected for recovery But this tool testdisk is without doubt most awesome. In the main ...


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exfat should be fine doing so. No read write was happening, the partition does not use journaling The fact that the file system does not use journaling is the exact opposite of "being fine" removing a drive without unmounting it properly. ;) The OS can't easily fix inconsistencies because there is no such journal. Use TestDisk Briefly, your drive still ...


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The recommended/easiest way is to boot Ubuntu (Studio) from the live USB and either simply let the automatic installer (install Ubuntu 16.04 and let the installer do the partitioning for you) or, when it asks you how you want to partition, click 'Something Else' and use the installer's manual partitioner that comes up. Naturally I would expect that you would ...


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UPDATE: Can't create more than one extended partition (thanks @ByteCommander), so creating a primary partition would still work in this case. This would be my course of action in your case: Start up a LiveUSB and open gparted. Alternatively, if your /dev/sda6 partition is bootable and can run gparted, you can do this operation from there too. Shrink /dev/...


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You have two options. the quick one: using Gparted, format the 100Gb block as ext4. Let's say most of your stuff is in /home/username/Videos. Create a new directory called /home/username/NewVideos. Mount the new partition at /home/username/NewVideos. Move all of your stuff from Videos to NewVideos. Remove the (now empty) directory Videos, and rename ...


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/dev/sda1/ext4 can not exist. The device name must be only /dev/sda1.


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As stated, you can't resize partitions while you are using them. To resize root partition, boot via Ubuntu LiveUSB/DVD or dedicated GParted Live CD/USB. If you use Ubuntu liveUSB/DVD, open the terminal and type sudo apt install gparted Then, open gparted and shrink (top menu - Partition->resize) the partition you don't need to be so big (not SWAP!) and ...


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You can't resize the root partition while you're in Ubuntu. You must use the GParted Live CD/USB, and then, according to your picture, shrink sda5 and grow sda9


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In your case, you will have to shift all the partitions that are located to the left of your root partition to the left, to in the end create a 50 GB space at the left of your root partition. You cannot bridge two partitions if you are asking that. Mind you that this will take a long time, and may result in data loss if the operation is interrupted. Please ...


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SOLVED: I was able to split the SSD with a live usb stick with Kubuntu on it. The default partion manager didnt work, but I installed gparted on the live stick and could do what Ubuntu and Windows refused to do for me. No idea why the other ways didnt work, but now I know that i can install programs in live-stick session! Thanks for your great help!


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I finally managed to solve the problem. It's quite easy once you gain the basic understanding. The main thing is that in Linux you should never use graphical user interface and always stick with terminal. I did the following in terminal: sudo su This makes me sudo user by default without the need to put sudo at first everytime fdisk -l This checks for ...


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Try mkfs.vfat. Assuming your pendrive is /dev/sdb sudo mkfs.vfat -I -n "Name you want" /dev/sdb will create a new FAT32 filesystem on /dev/sdb. (If you want NTFS, replace mkfs.vfat with mkfs.ntfs) Explanation of -I: -I creates a filesystem on the entire /dev/sdb device, removing any previous partitions. From man mkfs.vfat: -I It is typical for fixed ...


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You can try to select "Create partition table", under the device menu in Gparted, in order to fully reformat it. (Select msdos as the partition table type). Then, you should be able to create a new partition on the USB stick. If that doesn't work, a very simple (But slow, and I'm sure there's a better way) way to fix this would be to simply overwrite the ...


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It is found that the problem is due to a bug in usb-creator-gtk. It is setting improper block-size during the creation of bootable media. If this bug affects you, you can mark it here : https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/usb-creator/+bug/1589028


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A command-line method to make a live USB for UEFI systems Please note: this deletes all data on the target device. Install prerequisite: sudo apt-get install p7zip-full Assuming the target USB is at /dev/sdb (please check first with gnome-disks or sudo fdisk -l and be sure you know what you are formatting) Destroy existing partition table: sudo ...


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Try dd if=/path/to/my/ubuntuiso/ubuntu.iso of=/dev/sdb this way never failed me. (Note b not b1 at the end - will destroy other partitions if present) Did you check if the ISO is corrupted? Also doing this from TTY while not logged in the graphical environment could help in tracking down the problem. Edit: instead of using the ISO you could use /dev/null ...


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I use UNetbootin on Ubuntu (both older version and 16.04) and it works fine on my PC. Here's the link for more info. sudo apt-get install unetbootin



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