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Chances are your partition table is damaged, or possibly just a little bit odd. GParted tends to show disks with such partition tables as being completely empty (with no partitions), which is unhelpful. The solution is to fix the partition table. Unfortunately, it's unclear from your post exactly what's wrong with the partition table. Posting the output of ...


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If you've exhausted all windows recovery methods available with a startup disk, then it may be that your only choice is to reinstall, but it is possible that all your data is still there, so reinstall windows on the same partition And all uncorrupted data will be in the C://windows.old folder. In my case, I still had everything, nothing was corrupted.


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Gparted is unable to read the partition table of your HDD. Take a back-up of your HDD, then boot to Live Image, open the Gparted,and go to Device > Create partition table. ** Note that the by creating/recreating the partition table you'll lose all your data on the Hard Disk. So make a Backup first. Do it on your own risk. **


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The Internet is filled with warnings to not do what you did, but you're right that there should be a warning in the program itself. Posting about it here will do no good, though. You may want to file a bug report to get such a warning inserted into GParted. As to repairing it, I've heard that it can be done, but you're better off asking about that on a ...


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I found out the reason why this didn't work, i erased the EFI partition, and i was trying to boot in UEFI mode, and (don't know why) even without UEFI boot, it woldn't boot, so i created an EFI partition, and now i can boot to ubuntu :P before this, i tried to do something (which went wrong): I had a backup.tgz, and extracted it to my disk, and some files ...


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I had an I/O error that looked a lot like yours. In my case, the solution was easy: the SD-card was manually locked. So I just had to move the small switch in the SD card to unlock it. Afterwards, all errors disappeared.


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Move swap partition sda2 to the end of your disk. Resize sda1 to maximum. Don't be afraid to experiment to the point where you press "Apply All Operations" - this is where actual disk writes will start.


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Okay so after waiting 3 hours I went to sleep and when I woke up it was completed. Didn't know it would take this long but it did. Now I can download games from steam :P


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You have to expand the extended partition (the light blue one, /dev/sda3 in your case) first. Then you will be able to expand /dev/sda5.


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You don't need to run anything from the command line as gparted takes care of this all for you. Simply resize the partition in gparted. You will first need to move sda11 over so that the free space follows sda10 before you can grow it.


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Using gparted, select your USB disk in the right top drop-down. Please be careful, since the next step will remove any data in your USB stick. After that, unmount any active partitions and go to Device > Create Partition Table.... Then select msdos and Apply. Finally, create a new partition using the filesystem you want (usually FAT32) and Apply All ...


1

Wubi? I'm pretty sure that wasn't supported for 14.04...do you mean the 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows' option? However, Helio is right, you can't really modify a partition size once it's made. So, you need to: Backup everything (Windows and Ubuntu) using the backup tools (search 'Backup' in the Dash and Start Screen/Menu) to some large storage that ...


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Your sda4 "extended" is sort of secondary partition table. If you are not planning to use more than 4 partitions in the future - and it looks like you don't, as you want to assign all the available space - just delete it, and then extend your sda3. In other words: sda4 is not an actual partition with files, and you don't have to worry about merging any ...


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It is easiest to install Windows first, if you have the option you should let the Ubuntu installer do most of this work for you. The installer is very intuitive with many special options for computers with windows already installed on it. For my current build I dedicated most of my HDD to Windows because I know I can put my media on it and share it across ...


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There is 510MB of sda2 extended partition in between. You have to get rid of that, only then you can resize sda1. As far as I know there is only one way to achieve this. You have to create the partition table once again


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That's because you have /dev/sda2 "in the middle", and since the scheme you see in gparted is a physical representation of the partitions on the disk, extending /dev/sda1 would actually mean overwhelming /dev/sda2's space, which of course is not allowed. So you need to first remove /dev/sda2 in order to extend /dev/sda1


2

You can only resize partitions to include adjacent free space. In your case there is none, because sda1 is at the beginning of the drive and there's another partition sda2 right behind it. Since sda2 is an empty extended partition, I recommend that you delete it, then resize sda1.


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You have an extended partition /dev/sda2 which contains unallocated space, delete the partition first and then extend the 1st partition /dev/sda1


3

Compare the free mem: line with the swap: used line and you can see that there isn't enough available RAM to turn swap off. You will need to increase the amount of RAM available to the VM. You do this in the setting for the machine in the manager by moving the Base memory pointer or keying in a higher value in the box to the right of the pointer as below:


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No, Just keep it at the end of the disk to optimize performance as long as you don't need the unallocated space. Once you need it, just do the necessary steps before you go to bed (moving partitions takes a long time) and let the computer work all night. Yes. It just means that gparted will do an extend and move behind the scenes for you. `


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Never ever stop a resize or an e2fsck! If your files are not all lost by now, let the e2fsck finish! Sorry to be the harbinger of bad news... :-(


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Yes, that's possible. In gparted just resize the Windows partition a bit and add the space to the Ubuntu partition. Depending on the order of the partitions on your drive you may need to move them in order to get the freed up space near the Ubuntu partition. BTW: there's a good chance that Windows wants the hard drive to be checked after this just because ...


0

You have to do this in steps. First add the unallocated space to the extneded partition, sda4 -> apply changes Next you have to move your partitions one at a time until the unallocated space is adjacent to your / partition. You have to do it is steps -> move a partition, apply changes ... move a partition -> apply changes


0

Your partition table is damaged, or at least quirky enough for parted to not know how to deal with it. It looks like you've probably just got stray GPT data, which is easily removed by fixparts (part of the gdisk package in Ubuntu). See this page or the FixParts documentation for further details.


2

Just as in a bare metal system we can also boot our virtual machine from a live CD .iso we had mounted as a CD-ROM to our virtual machine. Make sure you leave the hard disk boot order allowing to boot from CD-ROM first. After that we will boot this machine from a live session where we can access the still attached virtual drive from GParted. Consider ...


3

You only can resize (except expanding by moving the right border; depending on the file system) partitions that are unmounted. Every partition that is in use by your system is mounted. You can see it in gParted when there is this key symbol right to the partition name. So you have to unmount the partitions inside the extended partition (sda5, sda6, sda7) ...


2

First backup your data. Any time you resize you run a risk of losing data. Since you can't resize a mounted partition, Boot from a Live media, Open a terminal and issue the command sudo swapoff -a to insure the swap partition on the drive you are working with isn't in use. Run sudo gparted or gksu gparted. Right-click your extended partition and choose ...


1

You cant extend the partition, you have booted Ubuntu from. This is the reason, why it is locked. Additionally you have to move the Partition /dev/sdb2 so that the unused space is behind of it.* Booting from your Ubuntu disk will solve the Problem of the locked device. GParted is contained in the Ubuntu disk/stick. EDIT: * @Bytecommander told me, that you ...


0

If the goal is to have a live ubuntu on flash drive with persistent partition, you do not even need a Gparted Live CD. You can set up partitions first and then install live ubuntu later with usb-creator-gtk. Just boot from ubuntu cd or even use virtualbox to run ubuntu and all can be done in one session. The version of Gparted available for Ubuntu can ...


1

The problem is that you selected to use LVM (Logical Volume Management) when you installed Ubuntu. It provides to functionality to easily resize your Ubuntu partitions. THEORETICALLY! I tried that too on my first install and I found it not so easy. Well, first of all it creates one large partition with all the space you gave to Ubuntu. Inside this ...


0

I think you'll want to use clonezilla. From the clonezilla website: Clonezilla is a partition and disk imaging/cloning program similar to True Image® or Norton Ghost®. It helps you to do system deployment, bare metal backup and recovery. This will allow you to very simply create a .iso from a partition (I'm not too sure about multiple partitions but ...


3

Update At first the question was only about how create a smaller partition-image. So this answer is missing the part how to create a bootable Raspberry-pi OS, which will need two partitions and a MBR. Old guide on how to create a smaller sized parition image Create a new file which is exactly 16gb size. fallocate -l 16G sixteen.img Create a file-system ...


1

The crash during a partition merge likely damaged the file system. That's why you should create backups beforehand. The easiest “fix” is to re-format the partition, if you don't care about any data that may be recoverable. If you're lucky, you can salvage most of the data with fsck, but you should create a raw copy of /dev/sda5 and work on the image, in ...


2

Try this: Launch parted as superuser: in a terminal: sudo parted /dev/sdd (you will be prompted for your sudo password) Create a new partition table: in parted: mklabel gpt Exit: in parted: q And see if now gparted is able to handle the device



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