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If your motherboard offers this, there is generally a Hard Drive setting in the BIOs that will allow you to change the setup from IDE to RAID. Once you have made that change, you should be able to configure RAID but you would need to make sure that your motherboard supports SATA RAID or something similar, depending on your setup.


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If you need absolutely to do it from the liveusb then choose something else then select that large partition as the root partition / and use the same username and password and it should just save your home folder and documents, but it will not retain packages in any way reliably.


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If you have internet then go into a terminal and run sudo do-release-upgrade and it will upgrade from 12.04 to 14.04.1 or whatever the latest update is with no data loss or changed settings.


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You go do this all through terminal, but I personally find it easiest to run my file manager (I use nemo but nautilus is default) as root and to change permissions graphically. So open up a terminal and run gksudo nautilus. Open the properties like you did in the screenshot. Since you're root now, you will be able to change it to your user. This, however, ...


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Make use of a recovery software to recover all your data from it. Watch this to find out how it's done http://youtu.be/yjBeBjAvOfM


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I hate Stackexchange for not being able to comment under a certain amount of reputation. How are people like me supposed to solve problems? So this can be converted into a comment, too. However you can get the SMART-status of the disk with sudo smartctl -a /dev/sda Are the sizes of the partitions displayed correctly? Seems like a lot of partitions on ...


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Step 0: Boot from a LiveCD/DVD/USB You have done this. I am writing it for anyone who may read this later. This is important, as you can't change a tire of a car while you are driving it. Step 1: Disable Swap Open a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and enter sudo swapoff -a Step 2: Move or Delete Swap partion Make sure the swap partition is unmounted. ...


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You may upload a screenshot to some service, and rest here a link. Without an error description it is hard to say what you had encountered. About your second part of a question, if I properly understood you, the Windows just erased an old loader. It's not a big problem, unless you may load from USB stick. As the Windows doesn't recognizes an alien ...


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Short answer: When you installed Ubuntu, the installation have used the whole drive as 1 LVM partition, and that's why you can't create another partition, since there is no space left. See if this helps you shrink the partition.


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This will screw up your grub, you can follow this link, to make boot repair after partitioning your disk and installing windows. I recently had to use this method and it works if you install windows on a separate partition after Ubuntu is already installed. Do not see why the reversal would be any different, for any other OS or just for partitioned space ...


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Do you know if the original resize/move failed when moving the partition, or when resizing the partition? If it was during a move, then a good approach is to restore the dd image and try to figure out where the sectors are duplicated, and where the duplication (or copy) of sectors stops. From there you can work backwards to piece the two halves of the ...


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You'll need to move everything that's in your sda4 partition into your sda5 partition, delete sda4, extend the extended partition (sda2) and finally extend sda5. Because you'll be manipulating the Ubuntu partition, you'll either need to do the partition changes from the Backtrack partition or (recommended) in a live CD/USB. (Note that the data moving in the ...


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it's a long tricky process..you have to shift the sda3 partition to the end (it takes a while and DO NOT STOP the process if you're getting bored ^_^) after that you can resize your sda6 partition


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An extended partition is locked whenever any logical partition within it is mounted. In a live session, swap gets automatically enabled, so the swap partition (in this case sda6) will be mounted. Hence sda6 and consequently sda4 become locked. To unlock an extended partition, you have to unmount the logical partitions within it by right clicking them and ...


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You might try an iterative process using a terminal window starting at the root "/" directory such as the following: In a terminal run du -sk * Locate the directory using lots of space, and change into that directory Repeat step 1 until you find the file(s) using all the space, or run out of subdirectories and then need to go back up to the root "/" ...


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First of all, you are using Lubuntu instead of Ubuntu, so you do not have nano installed in your machine. You should use leafpad. The best way to open a text file as root is to type: gksudo leafpad the_file_adress. Second, Lubuntu 14.04 should not be using a swap partition. It must have got one, but its priority should be set as -1 and a zram "device" ...



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