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You can not move the left border of the extended partition (/dev/sda2) because it contains a logical volume (/dev/sda5) right at its start. Extended partitions are containers for logical volumes, but they are like a box without a bottom. If you would lift up the bottomless box, all its contents would still rest on the floor in the same place. It's the same ...


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You've got your order wrong, that's why it doesn't work. Instead follow this: Download gparted live and "burn" that to USB Shut down your machine normally turn it on in your BIOS/UEFI settings, choose to boot the USB (I can't tell you how exactly: this is hardware dependent, look through your BIOS/UEFI manual) Voila: now you can resize the partitions! :-...


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After booting from your USB Ubuntu, run the following commands: Use (or install on your USB live system if it's not already there) gnome-disk-utility. If it's not already installed, open a terminal and enter sudo apt-get install gnome-disk-utility which will install it. Open it and look to see what disk and partition number your Ubuntu installation is (...


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/dev/sdb is the entire block device, you don't mount this. You mount a partion that is on the device, example: sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt From the first image, it looks as if there are no partitions on the disk any way, or you have recently made some changes to the partiton table and the kernel is not aware of them, so it is best to run sudo ...


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New hard drives need to have a new partition created on them so that they can be used. I recommend using gparted. To install the program, type in the following from a terminal window: sudo apt install gparted Then gparted needs to be ran with elevated permissions: sudo gparted After your drive is configured, now you need to mount it somewhere. If ...


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Thanks @Curtis Gedak for your comment! From the GParted screen shot I assume that the partition you deleted freed up ~78 GiB of space between logical partitions sda7 and sda8. This makes it easy to grow sda7 to use the extra space. If you need to grow sda8, then that requires first moving the partition to left, then growing the partition which is ...


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Unfortunately we can not "shrink" a virtual hard drive that we accidentally grew too much with using the VBoxManage command. The only means of repair would be to create a new virtual drive of appropriate desired size and copy the data over. Still, there is no harm done on creating such a huge drive as long as we do not actually partition and use it. The ...


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Hopefully, the NTFS partition's list of locations on the disk where the data for each file lies is correct. The fix under that condition is fairly easy if you can copy the files to a different drive. Here's how: Remount the drive read-only The first thing to do is to stop all writing to the drive. Remount it read-only by opening a terminal (press Ctrl+Alt+...


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My apologies in advance to the community for the numerous links in this answer. To avoid losing data it's best practices to backup. While opinions vary widely as to the best approach I recommend imaging the device so you have a complete bit level backup of the entire device (see my answer at the link above). I can't comment on VMware as I typically use ...


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Explanation: The "The volume group setting is not found" error is thrown because there is a "lvm" flag (or in GParted it will display as "lvm2 pv") set for a partition AND there is no actual Volume Group setup in that partitions file system. Which then results in the misleading error msg from Clonezilla "unable to write to device". Solution: Once you ...


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Problem Restoring the MBR does not restore the OS. The OS exists on the partition, and you removed the partition, when you wrote over it with your Ubuntu install. That isn't your only problem though. According to How Can I Get Recovery Disks for a SONY VAIO Model: PCV-A1111L VPCL111FX/B, which I also linked in the comment, you may or may not have a hard ...


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@Harvey, that's why I asked you the question above. Restoring MBR would restore the Windows boot record if you had created a dual boot system, which doesn't seem to be the case. If you want to revert to Windows now, you must boot from the Windows installation DVD and do a brand new Windows installation. Windows will fix your MBR error automatically.


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Back up any important data. This should work fine, but if something goes wrong, your partition table could be corrupted. Boot from a live CD or USB as Ubuntu cannot resize partitions while they're in use. If there's a symbol that looks like a key on your swap partition, right-click on it and click "Swapoff". If you haven't already, resize your NTFS partition....


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This is typical and most users see this message. You can safely ignore it. See the answer here Partition does not start on physical sector boundary?


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Wait for somebody else's opinion, but here's mine. Notice this from your log: Drive: sda _____________________________________________________________________ Disk /dev/sda: 512.1 GB, 512110190592 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 62260 cylinders, total 1000215216 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / ...


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Simple fix. Open a terminal, and run: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g sudo reboot sudo ntfsfix /dev/sdb3 #Replace accordingly



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