Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

With a dual-boot system, any partition changes can be dangerous. Make a clonezilla (or similar program) backup of your entire drive before making any changes to your system. This way, if you muck it up, you can always restore the image and try again. I cannot stress this enough. Make a good backup first! If you boot into windows (Vista or newer), you ...


0

DO NOT USE GPARTED FIRST OFF (Its only good for live cd/usb to install the os, IMHO) Insert USB Verify the OS recognizes it by opening nautilus Close nautilus Click Super Key (windows key on most laptops) Search for 'disks' Select 'disks' Select correct volume in the left column (Should say usb flash) Click 'more settings' in the top right of the ...


0

According to answers like this, Linux has only partial support of HFS+. You will not be able to resize it from Gparted or any other way, except doing it from Mac. You can only read HFS partition. The only error of Gparted is that it crushes instead of telling you that this action is impossible.


0

It is possible that you encountered a bug in the version of GParted packaged for Xubuntu 14.0. I suggest booting from media containing GParted Live, of which the most recent version is 0.19.1-4. A newer release is anticipated early next week.


0

In Ubuntu, you could use the following command in your terminal(Ctrl+Alt+t) to locate these. df -h for file system mount points: phlin@ubuntu:~$ df -h<br> Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on<br> /dev/sda1 451G 270G 159G 63% / udev 3.9G 4.0K 3.9G 1% /dev tmpfs 786M 948K 785M 1% /run none ...


0

You should use pkexec gparted. The desktop and/or launcher shortcuts already do this.


2

Its very much likely that you might have extended your partition over a partition that didn't have enough space, so you might have overwritten some data. However, thats not the only case. Probably nautilus is failing to pick up the C: drive. So, for starters, try accessing disks as a superuser, that is, Ctrl+Alt+T to open the terminal, and type in: sudo ...


1

Managed to solve my issue, reflecting on Nattgew's comment. Since you cannot move an extended partition through gparted, you have to expand it, then move the inside partitions and then shrink it on the other side. The problem was that the partition was set to be aligned to MiB, and after taking the available space it became unaligned on the right, leaving ...


0

I made the silly mistake of formatting a partition by accident. I was installing a linux distribution called crunchbang on my netbook, so I don't have to bring my laptop to class every week. I was intending to format a USB flash drive for this purpose, when, to my dismay, I formatted an ext4 partition containing over 500gb of data to fat32. This is a ...


2

That unknown partition is the windows system reserved created by the Windows 7 or 8 when doing their respective installation. It is approximately 128 MB for system reserved stuff, which includes part of the installation process and booting. You do not want to delete that partition except if you want to remove Windows completely. The flag shown in the image ...


0

If I delete my Windows partition, can I still boot ubuntu from a live usb (DriveDroid) and install it into the newly unallocated space? Yes. It looks like the Windows partition is corrupted. This will not prevent you from booting from a live usb. Formatting the partition should allow you to safely install a version of ubuntu assuming the hard drive ...


1

I have recently done something very similar. I erased the MBR of my hard disk. (Dont ask !!). Anyway, it was very easy to recover the lost partitions using a tool called testdisk. sudo apt-get install testdisk Run testdisk from the command line. I'm not in front of my main PC right now so I can't run it and give you exact instructions but I am sure a ...


0

Here a link to a related question we had some time ago: Recovering Very Important Lost Data From Ntfs Partition If the data is REALLY important. Stop using the disk/partition NOW. Unmount it! And do a read only copy of the disk. Every time you try to recover something on the original disk you are in danger of loosing more data. Then try recovery tools on ...


0

After you delete unneeded files, a simple way to empty /boot/.Trash-0 is: 1) open a terminal 2) use sudo xterm (or whatever terminal you like) to open a second terminal session 3) in the second terminal, go to the trash folder with cd /boot/.Trash-0 4) check to make sure you're in /boot/.Trash-0 with pwd 5) remove everything in .Trash-0 with rm -r (be ...


0

I don't think you'll be able to 'extend it' due to it's position on the drive, at least in the classical sense. Regardless of your decision after the fact, you will have to format the unallocated space, ideally with ext4 since that is what you used for your Ubuntu install partition. You will then be able to mount the new space. If your Ubuntu install was ...


2

You can move and extend system partitions with GParted from a live system: Unmount and swap off all partitions with a key symbol in front of them (if any) through the context menu. Grow the extended partition (sda4) to include the unallocated space in front of it. Move and resize the logical partitions (sda5 and sda6) to your liking. Commit the changes and ...


0

I too tried and failed many times till I found these instructions: http://www.wdong.org/wordpress/blog/2014/05/28/installing-ubuntu-14-04-to-bcache/ They sound somewhat hairy but this is probably the only feasible way to get bcache going, at least until bcache becomes part of the ubuntu installer. The only curious omission in the instructions is the very ...


0

Follow the steps below: Delete the 4GB ext4 disk partition (previously, swap) so that File System shows unallocated space. Now, right-click the linux partiton (in your case, /dev/sda2) and select resize. Include the unallocated disk space into the linux partition by allocating as per your requirement. UPDATE In your case : Use, Ctrl+Alt+T Execute sudo ...


0

You are using LVM. GParted cannot see beyond the LVM volume, it can only see that the LVM volume is present. 115 GiB = 115*1024*1024*1024 bytes ~ 123480000000 = 123.48*1000*1000*100 = 123.48 GB (close enough to your SSD size) - that's an artifact of using SI decimal prefixes in some places and binary prefixes in others. Presumably the 4GB swap partition ...


0

You might try using the latest version of GParted Live (currently 0.19.1-4). The error appears to be in the mkntfs command which is part of the ntfs-3g package.


0

You might try using the command line utility gdisk to re-set the GPT partition to the following values (start: 2,048, end: 27,341,617,151). The start and end values are from the gparted_details.htm log file that you provided.


0

By switching the "u" units. The default sector size will show up when you create the partition. If you are starting to partition a new disk and you get this error, you can. create a partion with the defaut. n,p,1,Enter, Enter Display and get the partition error message. "p". switch units "u" delete the partition. "d" Now create again. this time the ...


0

Boot from gparted live cd http://gparted.org/livecd.php If you dont't want to have /dev/sda5 partition any more right click on it and remove - this 100MB of data will be lost. (You can't do this right now because it is mounted). Right click on /dev/sda6 and resize. or down size /dev/sda5 and then resize dev/sda6 Be aware that there is always risk, ...


0

You must boot from a live-dvd/usb. Once in the live-session run gparted with root attributes: Open a terminal. Run it: sudo -i gparted From gparted, unmount partitions, delete /dev/sda5, increase /dev/sda6 merging the unallocated space with /dev/sda6. Possibly Ubuntu becomes unusable. Continue running: blkid /dev/sda6 #The output will say like: ...


1

You are only allowed four (4) Primary partitions. If you have to create a fifth (5) partition, then you will have to create it as logical partition. This option is available in Gparted.


0

You won't be able to do this while running Ubuntu. The reason is that you're extended partition (/dev/sda4) is currently being used, and so you cannot modify it. You'll need to boot to an Ubuntu live CD/USB. Once you do that, you can run GParted, extend (resize) the extended partition (/dev/sda4), then create more partitions, resize or move around ...


0

Just right click on the unallocated space and choose New. After that, choose partition type, File system type, add it, and then Apply. See images for detail.


0

Before you begin, backup all your files just in case! First, unplug and plug the card back in. Then, open a terminal and type the following command to list your device names: df These next two commands should give you similar results: sudo blkid and lsblk The device should be listed as /dev/sdb1 or /dev/sdc1. It is important you use the proper ...


0

Warning: Before performing any partitioning operation (e.g. resizing), make sure you have your data backed up somewhere other than the disk you're using. The problem is that you're trying to resize the partition Ubuntu is running off of. The little key icon next to /dev/sda1 indicates that you can't do anything with that partition, as it's mounted (in use). ...


0

Do not encrypt your entire root. If you need to, encrypt only /home. It's probably the encryption that's blocking things in GParted.


0

My suggestion: start over with a clean install and choose those options from the get go. There IS a way to convert ext2 to ext4 but it is a bit involved. If this is a brand new install, might just be easier to start over. Likewise, you can resize your partition but not when it's mounted (i.e. you are booted into it). Use the Gparted livecd or liveusb



Top 50 recent answers are included