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1

Make a backup. Messing around with partitions can cause data loss if something goes wrong, or make your system unable to boot. You'll need to boot off a LiveCD/USB, because you can't work on mounted partitions. Note that you won't be able to view mountpoints easily. Select the NTFS partition, and shrink it from the left. Then expand the extended partition ...


2

Yes, it's possible if you use a live USB/CD system. Step by step guide: Find an USB drive with ~1.5 GiB of free space I highly recommend that you back up any important data from that USB drive before continuing Download any recent Ubuntu image from the Download page (if you don't have one lying around already). Launch the Startup Disk Creator ...


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You could use parted or gparted to do this from a live CD since the partitions must not be in use while this is done for extending this should be done before resizing the filesystem, when shrinking a partition you should first resize the filesystem then the physical partition. Resizing the filesystem is done by resize2fs command if it is an ext[2-4] ...


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Support for resizing LUKS partitions is being added right now to KDE Partition Manager. Grow support is already done in unreleased git versions and shrinking will be added soon. It will probably take a while until it reaches distributions and in particular Ubuntu but it will work at some point. Growing and shrinking LUKS in action: ...


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Running gparted can be very problematic if you're acting on the drive containing linux, you might want to try using a live version of linux, or try windows if you're dual booting in the current state I guess even on windows it'll show the partition as RAW. But some windows programs can help you recover your data, look around a little bit you might even ...


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This is a bug and this is affecting multiple users. I figured out an work around to install any flavour of Ubuntu 16.04 as this bug is present in all of them. Bug is related to grub so, Install Ubuntu 16.04 as usual (yes do this) Wait for Installer to crash As Installer crashes shut your PC down. Create a Ubuntu 14.04 live USB or use CD. Perform ...


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Had a similar problem upgrading from 14.04 LTS to 16 earlier today. Error message says cant install bootloader (Grub) on /sda. Several options given but no matter what selected the install program will not respond to an option and pressing ok on the menu. Only way out (for me) was to crash the install program by a HW reboot. I also think its a bug.


1

You don't combine partitions, you delete the old windows partition and grow the linux partition via GParted to claim all unused space. In your case, if you made a new partition to start clean, just delete it again. Make sure that there is no data to salvage from it before the delete. After this, you can grow the linux partition via GParted, but not if it ...


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As Alexiy stated what your describing can't be done because the disk being modified or partitioned can't be mounted or in use. Although what you can do is use a live USB version of gparted,or any live usb, and use the partitioning software. Gparted Live USB


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No, what you describe is not possible. You must create a live GParted media and boot from it to edit partitions.


2

Start a shell and type du /home/elliot/BigData This will return the used space, as caulculated by the files that exist on the partition. You can append -h for human readable and -s for summary. Per your comment, it's only showing 6.1GB used so something seems to be wrong with the partition. You can attempt to fix this with fsck. You need to unmount the ...


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If the only reason you want to encrypt your Ubuntu partition is because of fear for malware from Windows, then you probably don't want to do it. It is almost impossible for Windows malware to harm Ubuntu as Ubuntu generally speaking does not understand EXE files (unless you use Wine). If you want to encrypt your Ubuntu partition because you fear that ...


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I backed up my files from ubuntu to windows, the in windows I deleted both ubuntu partitions. Then I created a partition for my files. Then reinstalled windows. Now I have 2 partitions for windows, 1 partition for my files, and 1 partition for ubuntu. I am now waiting for ubuntu 16.04 and then I am going to install it. When installing I will create an ...


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actually gparted itself can help. When you initialize the disk/format it as linux type 8e, it actually assigns /dev/sda3 as disk id. Then you can use " fdisk /dev/sda" to see and list it.. Rest is easy, extending the volume group to see the disk, with vgextend, lvdisplay, pvextend ...


0

Try to get use to command line. Take advantage and explore fdisk command. You need to use sudo for this. Or I suggest the application gparted. You may have to install it from the Ubuntu repository or Software Center. It will give you user friendly interface that will make things easy for you. Note- If any of the partitions that you want to merge is in ...


1

Since the swap doesn't have any data stored on it, you can swapoff, remove the swap volume, extend your home-partition and recreate the swap at the end of the drive.


3

Maybe the GParted Live media is not created properly ... but did you know that you even can add GParted to the GRUB menu and boot directly from the GParted .iso file ? Here is how it works : Open a terminal and execute : sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install gksu gksudo gedit /etc/grub.d/40_custom Copy the following into the empty file : ...


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The small partition before Windows partition is probably needed to boot your windows partition and you mustn't touch it. You can try to follow these steps to install Ubuntu: Move the content of /dev/sda4 (1.39GiB) in a secure place (like Windows partition or an external USB); Now reboot your PC from Ubuntu live drive (DVD or USB) and delete /dev/sda4 ...


0

Well I checked /etc/fstab: # swap was on /dev/sda3 #UUID=b04d45f1-b892-4700-8f68-f1ad1ca21fbf none swap sw 0 0 #/dev/mapper/cryptswap1 none swap sw 0 0 Turned out it was a swap partition. I solved all my problems using Ubuntu bootable USB stick and gparted.


1

My FixParts utility (part of the gdisk package in Ubuntu) might be able to fix the problem; however, I can't promise that -- the fact that your logical partition resides entirely outside the space allocated to the extended partition might throw it for a loop. (That problem is extremely rare, and I don't recall enough details of how FixParts reads MBR ...


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You can see all files sorted with size sudo find / -type f -exec du -h {} + | sort --human-numeric-sort or show only files bigger than e.g. 100 MB sudo find / -type f -size +100M -exec du -h {} + | sort --human-numeric-sort You can monitor disk activity with iotop sudo apt-get install iotop then run it sudo iotop -ao and check disk write ...


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First, there's no such thing as an "unallocated partition." A partition is, by definition, a section of disk that has been allocated in the partition table. What most people mean by "unallocated partition" is unallocated disk space -- sectors of the disk that have not been allocated, and that are therefore part of no partition. Thus, "merging" unallocated ...


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You can move allocated partitions to the end of the disk right-clicking them one by one and choosing Resize/Move, so you obtain your unallocated space adjacent /dev/sda1. Then you right-click on /dev/sda1 and choose Resize/Move to increase its dimension. Pay attention: You must boot GParted from Live CD/USB in order to edit your disk.


3

From the screenshot we see that there are 17GB of unpartitioned space at the end of the drive. We see that there is only the swap partition (/dev/sda9) between the / (/dev/sda8) partition you want to grow and the free space. So we can do this in few simple steps, even from your running system without having to boot from a live disk: Launch gparted. Unmount ...


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You not have enough contiguous space for Partition 8 to grow because of the location of your swap partition. You will need to delete the swap partition and recreate it, which will change it's UUID (how fstab knows partitions). 1) Boot into your live environment 2) Delete your swap partition and commit the change 3) Resize your root ext4 partition as needed ...



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