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Mina, You asked what can be done on a non-modern drive that doesn't remap sectors? You will have to backup your files and then divide the partitions in such a way so that those sectors are not used. My rule of thumb is about a Gigabyte in each direction from the error, to be sure that those bad sectors don't spread (although it may be very old drives where ...


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The partition you are trying to re-size is mounted and in use (since it's your system partition), and you cannot unmount it when it is active (also since it's your system partition). To fix it: Boot from a USB or CD with a Linux live distribution (Ubuntu for example) Now use Gparted to re-size your partition. GParted is part of the default toolset in ...


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Okay. I fixed it. I'll explain for anyone that might ever come across this. On the GParted screenshot you see /dev/sdb/ extended has a key/lock infront of it. When I clicked info it said the following: Status: Busy (At least one logical partition is mounted) Alright. It was because I was booted into my Ubuntu. I burned GParted on a Live CD and booted that. ...


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You could try using apt-get instead of the software center sudo apt-get install gparted if it still complains about unmet dependencies apt-get can try to fix them with: sudo apt-get install -f


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I would use gnome-disk-utility formating the drive, not the partition. Next, (if it is the case) in Windows format in NTFS using Disk Managment. For the (so many) folder/files copying, grsync is a better choice than simple copy-paste. Pay attention at the Source and Destination "?" pop-up! Do a sync simulation first


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There are many factors which can influence drive performance. Transferring 12000 files of any size will not be a quick process, and 3 MB/s is a conceivable transfer rate for such a task. It sounds like your hard drive may also be suffering the effects of age. Full formats also are very time intensive, so the quick format option is nearly always your best ...


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You cannot do this from within a running system. You have to do the partitioning from a live media. Boot from Ubuntu (DVD/USB) installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing. On the Live desktop open GParted ...


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As has been stated in some comments, there is no hardware issue with the number of partitions; disk controllers and disks deal in sector numbers, and neither know nor care what data is on those sectors or to which partition the sector is allocated. AFAIK, OS-level disk caches are also not a concern. The old Master Boot Record (MBR) partitioning system is ...


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Please post a screenshot from gparted ! I was able to implement what you wish to do - resizing my root partition with gparted and it went well. However, you need to back up in a very precisely correct manner and evaluate whether you really need to take from a /home partition which is already too small. "What should I do" is of course the intuitive question ...


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In addition to the above very detailed advice, most of it excellent, I will add the following: 1) Aside from backing up all data which may be jeopardized, I create at least two redundant backups of boot, one by directly copying the entire partition to a new partition using a partition utility such as partition magic or gpart, both of which as I recall may ...


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No, your controller and other hardware do not care how many partitions you have, there is no reason for your specific concern.


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Try with this: sudo apt-get install ntfs-3g


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This did the job for me: sudo ntfsfix /dev/sda1 Where sda1 is the NTFS partition with the issue. After that command and next restart into windows, it will check the disk and things will work fine again.


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To Shrink your Ubuntu Partitions you can use Ubuntu live CD, It has included the GParted partition editor, with its help you can modify your partitions. Note: Please don't do this while it’s in use. Download Link: GParted http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php Download Link: http://www.ubuntu.com/download Document: ...


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You cannot un-mount the disk whilst your system is using it. It is easiest to install windows before linux in order to configure this simply, or put windows on an entirely different drive; Windows is rather an inconsiderate os and will ruin the master boot record of any systems already present, during its instillation process. This can be solved however by ...


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You cannot do this from within a running Ubuntu operating system. The system and the swap partition must be mounted to work at all. So you need a live media and do it from within there. Boot from the Ubuntu (DVD/USB) installation media. Select Try Ubuntu without installing, on Live desktop, Open GParted - the partitions are unmounted - resize. Note ...


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Yes, it is safe, and no there is no real reason to: linux ignores this flag.


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This problem started with the need to increase my /boot partition to make way for a rather large Ubuntu security update (4.2.0-25, meant to address the key ring exploit) which called for 183 MB free space. This was inordinately large, as far as software updates go, especially for users that have /boot separately partitioned (where 250 MB is historically ...


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In newer versions of Ubuntu, the command is: gparted-pkexec There's a bug that can happen in newer versions of Ubuntu where the gparted packages seem installed, but aren't. To fix that, you need to remove gparted and reinstall.


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From tty; Run updates: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade Check for Errors: sudo apt-get -f install Then unmount the deleted drive: umount /media/amit Then update your grub: sudo update-grub Reinstall unity: sudo apt-get aptitude install --reinstall ubuntu-desktop Next Install Terminal: sudo apt-get aptitude install ...


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I would recommend another GUI tool - KVPM. It combines functionality of GParted and system-config-lvm. Moreover, it allows some operations on live (mounted) partitions that system-config-lvm doesn't allow However, the volume has to be unmounted for shrinking. It is in universe repository since Ubuntu 12.04, so just do sudo apt-get install kvpm Note: ...



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