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The inconsistency is because you're using the Linux Logical Volume Manager (LVM). GParted can't read "inside" an LVM partition, so it's feeding you misleading information. You don't say why you want to resize your storage space, so I can't be sure how you should do the job. There are two broad possibilities: Using the space within Ubuntu -- If you want to ...


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I have not had this problem but try just unplugging if it is not doing any work. sudo umount /mnt/share


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Using gparted you should be able to select the ntfs partitions you want to delete and delete them - Once deleted you have to format the unpartitioned space into ext4 or fat32 (again using gparted) - If you dont want to completely remove windows you can shrink the windows partition down using diskmgmt.msc from windows If you decide to completely remove ...


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The sgdisk -v error output summarizes the problem. Basically, the disk is roughly half the size that the GPT data structures claim it is -- the disk's actual size (as determined by the Linux kernel) is 250,069,680 sectors (119 GiB), but the GPT claims that the disk is 457,179,647 sectors (218 GiB). This problem might occur if: You pulled a single disk out ...


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Chances are you need to repair the Windows 7 disk from within Windows. There are no tools in Ubuntu that can do this job. (The ntfsfix program does only the most basic checks and then flags the partition as needing repair in Windows.) Also, be sure you shut down the computer in Windows; do not perform a suspend-to-disk operation. The latter leaves the ...


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If writing with dd to the disk fails then it's quite possible your USB is bricked and will not function right again. USB drives do wear out - whether it be an external USB hard drive with spinning platters or a standard flash drive. Input/Output error indicates a problem with data write/read which can indicate broken hardware.


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By reading my own question I got a new search term were I found my answer. I'm still posting this so people in my situation don't give up on their drives. You can download GParted iso file from Sourceforge (230MB) and use Rufus to "burn" it to you're USB. Follow directions here. Boot from the USB and resize the partitions with right file system.


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Quoted from the OP's edit to his/her own question: By reading my own question I got a new search term were I found my answer. I'm still posting this so people in my situation don't give up on their drives. You can download GParted iso file from Sourceforge (230MB) and use Rufus to "burn" it to you're USB. Follow directions here. Boot from the USB and ...


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OPs answer. It seems like I have deleted the bios boot partition by mistake.(I realized this fact only after executing "boot-repair". ) and I created the partition - and followed the "boot repair" instructions. This worked fined for me. I found this to be very relevant as well . How to resolve the "GPT detected. Please create a BIOS-Boot ...


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When you install Windows after you installed ubuntu then Windows installs his own boot manager which will boot windows only. You can fix it with booting from a Linux Live DVD/USB and then reinstall Grub.


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According to Wikipedia, the maximum size of FAT32 on a disk with 512-byte sectors is 2TB. Taking that literally, it works out to 1.8TiB; but I suspect 2TiB was actually meant. Either way, that's still larger than what you're getting, but it's at least in the same ballpark. It could be that mkdosfs and related tools in Linux have a bug or intentional limit ...


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gParted will NOT let you format a disk beyond the limits of that filesystem. fat32 is not the correct filesystem for this (32 Gb is the max volume size). It probably is exFat you need (Windows will silently format it into exFat and call it fat32) exFat is not supported in gParted. fat32 is obsolete. Prone to filesystem errors and it is slow. I have no ...


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it looks like you want 2 different partitions for 2 different windows OS's and Ubuntu. Why don't you format the whole disk, divide your 300GB into 3 partitions only ..100gb each. I agree this is an overambitious partition configuration. I have 3 partitions 2 for windows and 1 for linux, I always use the 2nd NTFS as storage so that every time I have to ...


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First of all you need to understand that sda5, sda6, sda7 and sda8 are inside sda3. After that it looks simpler. Boot from LiveCD. Do not mount any partitions by clicking them. Run sudo swapoff -a Expand sda3 left. Move sda5, sda6, sda7 left. Expand sda8 left. Do not forget to press "Apply" button. After you do it you also need to update grub this way. ...


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Your partitioning scheme seems overambitious, but here goes. The structure of partitions on the disk has to be kept simple, since the BIOS has to be able to find something to boot. Thus, the restriction that you can only expand/move a partition to adjacent free space and cannot have fancy split partitions. Thus, if you MUST expand / (mounted on /dev/sda8), ...


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I had the same problem with NTFS in GParted to install Ubuntu 14.04.2 (told me to install NTFS-3G that was already installed) and I follow the simple solution of Curtis Gedak: shutdown Ubuntu, boot into Windows, shut it down normally and boot into Ubuntu again. And it worked perfectly for me.


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You need to boot from Ubuntu LiveUSB and start gparted there. I see that you have 19.53 unallocated space. You can use it to extend sda7. Move left side of sda4 left. Move left sda5, or remove it, if you do not need this "New Volume". Now you can extend sda7 left. Do not forget to press "Apply" button in gparted After you move the Ubuntu boot partiton ...


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You can't use the active OS to alter the media that hosts the active OS. It's like you doing brain surgery on yourself. You need to boot to an OS hosted on different media. A live-booting version of Ubuntu on a USB flash drive would be excellent, but back up everything you don't want to lose first!


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You can not resize partitions because they are locked. You need to boot from Ubuntu LiveUSB to do it. It is impossible to resize Ubuntu partitions from inside a working system.


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Disk Management has some restrictions. You can only shrink a partition or volume up to half of its free space, and you can only extend a partition having contiguous unallocated space to the right of it. Disk management cannot extend a basic partition using an unallocated space to its left. You can use a third party disk manager software, such as aomei ...


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Firstly, you can not work with mounted partitions. Since you are trying to modify the partition on which Ubuntu is installed, you can't do this from your installed OS as you cant unmount the partition. So what you have to do is: Create a live USB/CD and mood into Ubuntu Live In Gparted you start from the live environment, unmount the partition. If the ...



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