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3

This is how I would back up secure data like this. I'm assuming because you're using ssh keys that you're comfortable on the command line. Move all the keys to a single folder. Make a tar archive of that folder. tar -cf keys.tar /path/to/keys/folder Then I'd encrypt the tar file with OpenSSL, using the command openssl aes-256-cbc -a -in keys.tar -out ...


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I have encountered the same issue, by adding a ppa(ppa:nathandyer/vocal-stable), it broke my repositories. I was guided from the Author of Web Upd8, on how I can try to fix this, here are his steps that worked me. Backup your .gpg keys, just in case that something goes wrong. Lets make a folder in which we will house our backup in. mkdir ~/gpg-backups ...


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Use this: gpg --decrypt /tmp/directory.tar.gz.gpg | tar xzvf -


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Good! I finaly found the way! I've tested all method's to fix GPG error NO_PUBKEY and nothing working for me. I've deleted the entire contents of the folder /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d cd /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d sudo rm -R * sudo apt-get update And I use the Y-PPA-Manager method because I'm too lazy to create all pubkey's manually (too many): ...


3

You neither must remove GnuPG (1) installed as gpg, nor can safely. It can safely coexist with GnuPG 2 installed as gpg2, which is supported by Enigmail. The "old" GnuPG version 1 gpg is still used intensively by Ubuntu's (and Debian's) package management system and is not ready to be replaced by GnuPG 2 yet, at least doing so is not officially supported ...


1

GnuPG is an important part of the system and used for example by the package manager. You can't remove it without breaking the system.


0

No. The first time you connect to any SSH host, you will be presented with a similar message for that host. That is just how SSH functions.



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