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5

To me the stance the FSF takes is to rigid. I also can understand why; if they do not they tarnish their principle: software needs to be free. Problem though: that would not allow us to play MP3 and MP4 where we need to stick to OGG. Even using a tool to convert it to OGG would violate the FSF stance. So from a users point of view not really user ...


4

You should be able to install it using apt-get. Per "Where do I get a package for GNU Parallel?": sudo apt-get install parallel In your specific case, though, you'll want to run sudo make install instead of just make install. Alternatively, you'll need to specify a new root directory to your configure script.


4

GNU thinks that all software should be open source. They therefore object to things like the proprietary video drivers ( nuovo, and the just discontinued amd drivers ), as well as even the firmware that runs in most of the hardware in a modern PC, which is provided by manufacturers as binary blobs that the linux kernel community is willing to ship with the ...


3

There are a few ways of interpreting your question so I'll be explicit in my answers. Are all command line applications in Ubuntu GNU projects? Of course not, you can install whatever you like and there are many things that are part of Ubuntu or Debian directly that aren't upstream. What about the most the command-line applications that ship with Ubuntu? ...


1

GNU is originally Richard Stallman's project to implement free unix alternative. All modern Linux distributions are based on GNU project toolset. In Stallman's opinion, they should be called as GNU/Linux, instead of just Linux. For example official Debian FAQ does this. With Ubuntu, you already have GNU operating system. As of Unix shell, Linux is (almost ...


1

Almost all Unix commands exist with different versions depending on the OS used. There are significant differences, usually GNU extensions to the POSIX standard. On Ubuntu, you can expect the GNU version to be the standard for most of these commands, but not necessarily all. The most obvious example is /bin/sh which is a link to dash on Ubuntu and not any ...


1

You can see User-land "GNU" from Wikipedia- . So, GNU commands are available for Ubuntu. To see available commands, see List of GNU Packages. And for particular command (Ex : find): findutils from GNU Project


1

Your error message gives you the exact cause of the issue, and I've wrapped it in three asterisks below: file.c:102:0: fatal error: ***error writing to /tmp/ccF9p6T9.s: No space left on device*** This means that your /tmp directory, whIch holds temporary files and such, is full. You've said that you never reboot the box, because it's always computing ...


1

You must install dependencies before installing octave. A dependency is a file that something you are trying to install requires for it's operation. So, to install all the dependencies OCTAVE requires, follow these steps Open terminal. Type sudo apt-get build-dep octave. Enter password and follow instructions. This will install all the dependencies that ...


1

Find root partition You must know what's your root partition to boot Ubuntu. Try: ls Now you can see some disks and partitions. You must list each partition to find where ubuntu is installed. For example: ls (hd0,gpt3) If this is your root partition, you can see the directories boot, dev, etc, usr,... When you find it: set root=(hd0,gptX) where ...


1

Use the apt-src utility. sudo apt-get install apt-src;man apt-src. Then, you can: # I keep the sources in ~/apt-src/, # you may replace that with a directory of your choice mkdir ~/apt-src cd ~/apt-src # download the coreutils source + current patches apt-src install coreutils # build the unmodified source first apt-src build coreutils Now you have ...


1

It is available to install from the Universe repository. In a terminal window just type: sudo apt-get install gnudatalanguage This will also automatically install any needed dependencies. You can find out more information about this package on the Ubuntu website here.


1

grep takes '.' as 'any character'. So grep "t..........t@test.com" will do that. (Nice to solve crossword puzzle :-)


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You can read the output. diff doesn't give different exit status codes other than: 0 if inputs are the same, 1 if different, 2 if trouble. (from man diff) "Trouble" means it couldn't read a file, or pretty much anything else. From a little testing using diff (GNU diffutils) 3.3 and comparing folders, diff outputs messages to stdout or stderr: If one ...



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