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4

I wouldn't remove it. Given it is the default terminal emulator for the Unity/Gnome desktop environment, there could be some obscure program/script that use it unconditionally and you'll have an error (probably two years from now when you didn't remember what can have caused it). The preferred way is: Install the new terminal emulator, for example ...


0

Yes, there are a few methods to remove the terminal. You can use the Software Centre, and search for Terminal, then uninstall it. Alternatively, you can use a terminal application (like Guake or Terminator, for example) to remove the original with this command: sudo apt-get remove gnome-terminal Simple as that! Hope this helps.


2

What needs to be done In principle not a complicated question, however, you need to take care of a few things: You need (as I understand) to copy hidden files/directories recursively You will run into name clashes (duplicate names, I tried) The (python) script below takes care of both: It searches for files and directories recursively in given ...


3

If all the hidden files start with a dot (.), then you can do cp .?* /path/to/directory from the directory the hidden files are in. This command says copy all the files starting with a dot (.?*) to the directory specified. '*' is a wildcard. .?* requires at least one character after the dot '.'


0

The two answers I've liked best to solve this are using expect and this one where they recommend using the --init-file flag either in the shebang or when executing the terminal: #!/bin/bash --init-file commands to run ... and execute it as: xterm -e /path/to/script # or gnome-terminal -e /path/to/script # or the-terminal -e bash --init-file ...


0

You could redirect the output into a file then edit it with gedit COMMAND > output.txt then gedit output.txt


2

Edit your ~/.bashrc file and add this at the end: function cfinfo(){ cf target | awk '$1=="Org:"{printf "%s-", $2} $1=="Space:"{print $2}' } That function generates the string IB-Production depending on the output of the command cf target -s production. Then add this after that function definition in ~/.bashrc: ...


1

Try adding an ampersand at the end of the lines to put processes into background. #!/bin/bash gnome-terminal -x /bin/bash haguichi -d & cd /home/reed/StarMade gnome-terminal -x java -jar StarMade.jar -force & gnome-terminal -x ./StarMade-dedicated-server-linux.sh &


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What system you have? If Ubuntu, use terminal (CTRL+ALT+T) put in windows 'ssh user@111.222.333.444' user - username in remote system 111.222.333.444 - ip addres remote host.


0

Are you sure you have installed openssh server during ubuntu installation? If not you can install it like this from the terminal: sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install openssh-server And have a look at the ssh configuration guide: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SSH/OpenSSH/Configuring


0

127.0,.0.1 is the loopback address, meaning the machine "talks to itself" You need to enter the address of the ubuntu machine you want to connect to. You can find out on your router, or from a terminal prompt (on the ubuntu machine) with ifconfig and look for an ip address near one of the interfaces (wlan0,eth0 etc..) (not interface lo)


0

This is a hack! sudo cp /usr/bin/gnome-terminal ~/bin/detly-terminal Now change your Irssi.desktop file to use detly-terminal Tested and works on Unity If that would fail and you're ready to program something anyway, I would: download the source code, do a sed and replace gnome-terminal with detley-terminal, and recompile...


1

Along with the other answers you can also use the full path to the executable. For example, if your python executable is in /home/user/some_dir/python then running the following command from in the terminal will do the job: user@user-home:~$ /home/user/some_dir/python For ease of use you can create an alias for the above command so that you don't have to ...


6

Specify the path. If you're in the directory with the binary, that's as simple as: ./python Or yes, do as Muru suggested and add it to the path. That said, changing the path could interfere with how applications (running under your user) call Python. If you deflect them to the wrong version, they may function incorrectly. There is not a good way to ...


5

The default terminal being used in Ubuntu is actually intended for Gnome environment, where you can see top Menubars of applications you are running constantly . However, Unity - the default environment in Ubuntu, always auto hides Menubars.Thus the "Show Menu Bar" option is useful when in Gnome environment, and as you stated doesn't make any difference in ...


1

Please see this Ubuntu help entry: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ChangeTTYResolution


0

There are usually at least 2 common reasons: Either you aren't executing this command as root (typing id shows you who you're logged in as or Something else is managing packages at the same time you're trying to install a new one. To verify if there's anything else managing packages at this time, run ps -ef | grep dpkg - if you get dpkg processes in the ...


2

I've uploaded a Unicode test file which you should download and then cat in your terminal. E.g.: cat ~/Downloads/Unicode-sample.txt and then use Shift+PgUp and Shift+PgDn in the terminal to verify whether all characters display correctly. If you get the same results in your terminal as opening the original source file in your browser, your font is fine; ...


0

It's perfectly normal that locate still finds a file after it's been deleted as locate uses a database to perform its search. (and that's why it's so much faster then find). An example: Go to a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and type the following command: touch errakesh123.txt Now do an ls. It's there isn't it? Now do: locate errakesh123.txt It's ...


0

You can easily restore your 60 seconds graph by opening the System Monitor Preferences menu: Open the Resources Tab and set the interval to 1,00 as shown below: Or from the command line: dconf write /org/gnome/gnome-system-monitor/graph-update-interval 1000


2

Since I don't have enough reputation points to add a comment to the answer to improve it. It would seem that the only way I can add information is to create a second answer. So, I will repeat what was said as the answer and build on that. Edit the .bashrc file for the user that you want to have the date stamp modified for. If you see "user@host:~$" you're ...


0

Are you sure you didn't typo when did it, as that is command. It may be easier on you if your in the home directory of the user to just mv my_static /home/user/static


2

From mv manpage: SYNOPSIS mv [OPTION]... [-T] SOURCE DEST mv [OPTION]... SOURCE... DIRECTORY DESCRIPTION Rename SOURCE to DEST, or move SOURCE(s) to DIRECTORY. If the destination (your "new location") is a directory, the source ("old location") will be moved into that directory. So, in order to rename a file/directory you have to ...



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