Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

tried to run /opt/COMODO/post_setup.sh and it says "Please run this script with adminstrative priviledges even though I am logged in as an adminstrator. Please note that, even you logged in with your admin user as you say this means nothing in Linux, even you have admin privileges, you in really not using those privileges and in really system treats ...


0

This seems to be a problem related to certain fonts. See https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/ttf-liberation/+bug/299158 Changing to Ubuntu Mono font in gnome-terminal solved the problem for me.


2

You need a sequences of Escape characters: echo -e "\e[9mI\e[0m" or using printf printf "\e[9m%s\e[0m\n" "I" Try this: echo -e "\e[9m" Then type some text and reset with: echo -e "\e[0m" Source


1

All sorts of other options apart from q. Open another terminal and kill it from there. Kill it from the System Monitor task list. Close the terminal window. These assume a desktop environment. Also for servers... Ctrl-Alt-F1 (or F6/F7) and log in again to kill. Connect again (Telnet/SSH) and kill. And finally - it is open source, patch it.


3

If you are using gnome-terminal, yes, you can disable that the F10 key opens the menu: Open gnome-terminal's menu with F10 or with the mouse, select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts, then uncheck "Enable the menu shortcut key (F10 by default)".


1

To also uncheck the Use the system fixed width font checkbox from the command line, use: gconftool-2 --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/use_system_font --type=boolean false Tested on Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.1. Your mileage may vary.


19

TL;DR The standard way to quit htop is F10 or q. Therefore if you can't use F10, use q (lowercase).


12

You always can have the interupt signal keys Ctrl+c. Basically Ctrl+c sends the SIGINT (interrupt) signal, ; by default, this causes the process to terminate. Just like top, htop can be quit by pressing Q. SIGINT The SIGINT signal is sent to a process by its controlling terminal when a user wishes to interrupt the process. This is typically ...


0

TL; DR no with gnome-terminal, but you can do it with [terminator][1]. Install terminator as usual: sudo apt-get install terminator And then run it from the dash, right click, choose "preferences" in the menu, and you can see this: Now if you open multiple tabs you have ...where you can also see a vertical split terminal.


1

TL;DR No. That's (currently) not possible without changes in the source code and I assume that this is not your intention. But the idea has something. I prefer to renounce horizontal space. The only thing you can do is to switch between top and bottom: % gsettings range org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Settings tab-position enum 'top' 'bottom' Move ...


4

Since you mention you solved the problem for your specific situation, below a solution for general purpose. Thanks to xdotool's --sync option, it works pretty reliable in the tests I ran; I could "send" commands to specific terminal windows and it ran perfectly without an exception. How it works in practice The solution exists from a script, which can be ...


0

I wrote a function for this: function begin_install_log() { if [ $# -eq 0 ] then echo "No arguments supplied" HIST_NUM="" else HIST_NUM=$(history|tail -n 1|awk '{ print $1 }') HIST_NUM=$((HIST_NUM + 2)) OUTPUT_FILE=$HOME/environment/ansible/.install_cache/${1} fi } function capture_install_log() { if [ ! $HIST_NUM ] then echo "run ...


0

You can define a new profile, and switch to the defined profile to change the window size. Edit -> Preferences -> Profiles. EDIT: You can also try using the --geometry flag, see here. Additonally, take a look at gconf-editor, you might find a way to configure it under "Apps".


1

Ctrl+Insert for 'copy', Shift+Delete for 'cut' and Shift+Insert for 'paste' also works on most places, including GNOME terminal.


2

for me the following worked in our company network with proxy: cd /etc/apt mv ./apt.conf ./apt.conf.bak this is to force the system to use the new file we create now. cd ./etc/apt/apt.conf.d create new file "95proxies" and add there the content of the apt.conf file Example: Acquire::http::Proxy “http://proxy_url:proxy_port/”; Acquire::ftp::Proxy ...


3

If you want to know the terminal program you are using, use this: ps -o 'cmd=' -p $(ps -o 'ppid=' -p $$) Run this just after opening the terminal (shell) without forking any further shell instance. When you open up the terminal program, it basically spawns a child program, a shell. So the parent of the spawned shell is the terminal itself. In other ...


2

If you just want the name of the terminal program, you'll most probably find it under Help > About.


3

If you want to know which shell: echo $SHELL You can also do ps aux | grep $(echo $$ ) for that same purpose. If you want to know filename or device name which is connected to stdin. (mostly useful in tty), run tty command Many terminals seem to mask themselves as xterm compatible, which is reported by echo $TERM or echo $COLORTERM. Virtual terminals are ...


5

The short version (thx @Serg) cat /etc/alternatives/x-terminal-emulator The long version sudo update-alternatives –config x-terminal-emulator and look for the * in the output ;) Example output There are 7 alternatives which provide `x-terminal-emulator’. Selection Alternative ———————————————– 1 /usr/bin/xterm 2 /usr/bin/uxterm 3 ...


1

Type in printenv from the terminal window to view all variables of the open session. Type in echo $COLORTERM from the terminal window. NOTE: this does not work with all terminals, one like sakura does not report this back. root@terrance-Linux:~# echo $COLORTERM gnome-terminal the one below is from an aterm terminal. root@terrance-Linux:~$ echo ...


1

I recommend checking locale charmap's output (which reports the values set by $LANG, $LC_CTYPE, $LC_ALL). This one does not directly query the terminal, but it's essential for most of the applications that the locale is set up correctly, consistently with the terminal. If it reports anything else than the actual behavior, not only your app but pretty much ...


0

Finally worked this out. The alt+number conflicts with gnome-terminal's keyboard shortcuts to switch between tabs. That was always the case, but in older versions of gnome-terminal the combo would switch tabs if there were tabs to switch to and switch IRSSI windows if there weren't. If you disable or re-map the "Switch to Tab ..." shortcuts (at Terminal > ...


0

Switch on your computer. Press and hold the Shift key, which will bring up the Grub menu. Select the line which starts with Advanced options. Select the line ending with recovery mode. Your PC should display a menu with a number of options. Select the line ending with Drop to root shell prompt In the terminal enter the commands # mount -o remount,rw ...


0

Here is a half-solution, addressing the problem of determining the encoding when /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/encoding is equal to the string current. Assuming that the string current means that gnome-terminal should use the current locale. It is tempting to check the LANG variable to determine the encoding, but according to this question, that ...


2

if xdotool is installed: sudo apt-get install xdotool and assuming the current session's window is in front (since the command needs to be typed), just run: xdotool getactivewindow getwindowname How to get the current session's title without installing additional software If you'd like to do it without installing anything additional, you can use: ...


1

Run sudo update-alternatives --set x-terminal-emulator $(which gnome-terminal.wrapper) The system has x-terminal-emulator , which is symlinked to a particular program. When you've installed terminator , that symlink has been somehow changed to terminator. The command above will restore that to gnome terminal.


0

OPs answer Problem was a custom locale. Now using standard en_US.utf8 and gnome-terminal works normally.


0

Run xterm from your dash and install gnome-terminal and USC again: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install gnome-terminal sudo apt-get install software-cente If you don't have xterm then swtich to one of your virtual consoles tty's using the CTRL+ Alt+ F1 or f2..6 Then run the same commands above after your login with your username and password.


0

None of the above worked for me on Debian Jessie. I worked out the following solution from recent gnome docs ## Find profile, see also Edit -> Profile Preferences -> Profile ID gsettings get org.gnome.Terminal.ProfilesList list ## Substitute the relevant profile for UUID below - but include all / and : gsettings set ...


0

OK, it's a bug. Probably the nautilus issue is launched before the shell that sets up the SSH* variable. Workaround (ugly). open a terminal kill the file manager: nautilus -q restart it again: nautilus close the terminal Now the new nautilus session in the desktop is descendent from a shell with the SSH_AUTH_SOCK correctly set up, and the spawned ...


1

First install sudo apt-get install python-setuptools Then sudo easy_install simplegui You don't have permission to write to /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/test-easy-install-8242.write-test it is owned by root.


1

The gnome-terminal option --title is often overridden by your .bashrc file which updates your terminal (or tab) title as the prompt changes. case "$TERM" in xterm*|rxvt*) PS1="\[\e]0;${debian_chroot:+($debian_chroot)}\u@\h: \w\a\]$PS1" ;; *) ;; esac Other posts have recommended commenting out this logic in the .bashrc, but ...


0

Some guy on IRC helped me figure out what the issue was. The syntax in the example was not correct (at least for me) and the error spit back by the terminal is really hard to follow. in a nutshell, the mount command that worked was this: sudo mount -t cifs -o "username=myUserName,password=myPassword" //ip_of_network_destination/dir . the terminal doesn't ...


1

There could be a file with a very long name, consisting mainly of spaces, in the directory. This will force the file list into a single column. To test for the presence of such a file name, do this: find . -name *\ \ \ * This will find filenames with three or more consecutive spaces.


1

Are you sure you are not mixing lowercase L with 1? ls -l (list long) shows a long list of 1 file per line but with as many lines as the terminal shows. If "ls" is the only command that does this you might have used the "1" (digit one) option somewhere. [man ls][1]: -1 Prints one entry per line of output. Your command could be aliased to using a ...


0

use the command ls | tr "\n" " " This will remove the new line and thus will list all files on the same line. You can make an alias to this command and add it to your .bashrc so you can use the alias instead. gedit .bashrc add the following line: alias lll=' ls | tr "\n" " " ' Save an close then source your .bashrc source .bashrc Now you can ...


0

Ctrl-J is the keyboard mapping for Linefeed. When you map ctrl-C to ctrl-J, it means that it will interrupt the command any time you push the return key over ssh, which is basically right when you run the command. Try mapping interrupt to a different hotkey so that it doesn't overlap with another common key combination.


0

xterm doesn't have built in transparency, from what I know. You may be able to use a compositing window manager to change the transparency of an xterm window, but I think you'll be hard pressed to do it natively in xterm.


1

I guess this is how you fix this. You can change the locale in /etc/default/locale. You can try setting the contents of that file to: LANG="en_US.UTF-8" LANGUAGE="en_US" source Blog post


0

As described in my comment: apt-get install is for installing software which is not yet present on your computer. For doing the same job as update-manager does, you have to run apt-get upgrade i personally prefer apt-get dist-upgrade because it also installs kernel upgrades etc. Probably update-manager acts more like dist-upgrade. man apt-get is a good help ...


0

SSH connection multiplexing or connection sharing might solve your problem. Take a look at this ssh multiplexing wiki. It might be able to cut down the number of connections you are making to the server and therefore not trigger the brute force settings. To answer the second part of the question -- How to do this in a bash script/close other windows. ...


0

If you want to see output in the terminal from which you call another terminal to run a command, why not execute the command in the calling terminal in the first place ? But perhaps you have your reasons. I'd suggest using a file to output the command to that file, and then cat it inside the calling terminal. xterm -hold -e 'tty 2&>1 testfile' ; ...



Top 50 recent answers are included