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0

@heemayl and @bashBedlam Thank you. CTRL+L does what I want. But I am used to typing clear all the time. So I kind of worked around it by copying /lib/xterm/x/{xterm, xterm-256color} from ubuntu 12.04. There is an environment variable named $TERM that stores this file. Then I read your answer and tried CTRL+L and it worked. I got curious and was trying to ...


4

What you want is to type CTRL+L instead of clear. This will send a "Form Feed" to the terminal. Basically it will move everything up the height of the terminal window clearing the screen without affecting your scrollback.


3

It may be easier to add something like the code below to your .vimrc file, rather than changing profile settings in the GUI. syntax enable "(syntax on also works) Note that quotes are a comment in .vimrc highlight Folded ctermbg=White ctermfg=Red If you already have a highlight line for other purposes add this as a new line below it, e.g. have two ...


-1

The driver should already be there by default. If it doesn't work, try apt-get update


1

GNOME Terminal should support true color in 16.04. Source: https://gist.github.com/XVilka/8346728 Trying out the test code from that gist:


0

I changed my .bashrc file to a pristine one and the problems were gone. Added one by one the lines of my original .bashrc file and found the one causing the issues: ### Bashhub.com Installation. ### This Should be at the EOF. https://bashhub.com/docs if [ -f ~/.bashhub/bashhub.sh ]; then source ~/.bashhub/bashhub.sh fi


5

Shift+Page Up scrolls up by one page at a time and Ctrl+Shift+↑ scrolls up by one line at a time.


1

Be sure to enable Shortcuts in your gnome-terminal preferences:


0

I had the same problem when I try to install Ubuntu 16.04 on my lenovo laptop. I couldn't open terminal from my live usb installer. I couldn't even be able to open installer to install in my laptop. It happened because Ubuntu image is not downloaded properly even though it shows download successfully. So I posted same problem on Ubuntu forums. You can check ...


0

I had the same problem after upgrading from Ubuntu 15.10. I needed to reconfigure my locales. Before you do this: Remember that you get back to the GUI ("normal screen") by pressing Ctrl + Alt + F7 Open Text-and-Terminal Emulator (without GUI) Press: Ctrl + Alt + F1 Reconfigure Locales $ sudo dpkg-reconfigure locales $ sudo locale-gen "en_US.UTF-8" $ ...


0

What worked for me is putting the font files in ~/.local/share/fonts and then running, $ sudo fc-cache -vf ~/.local/share/fonts The fonts in ~/.local/share/fonts are available for all apps now.


-2

Your problem is that, by the time you open a terminal, the i flag is no longer set in '$-'. Replace: # If not running interactively, don't do anything case $- in *i*) ;; *) return;; esac with: # If not running interactively, remember case $- in *i*) IsInteractive=1;; *) IsInteractive=0;; esac


2

Consider using a proper editor for editing long commands. Set EDITOR to your favourite editor, for example, gedit in your .bashrc: EDITOR=gedit Then, when you want to edit a long command, press CtrlX CtrlE. Gedit should open up, with the current command line already in it. Edit it your heart's content, then save and quit. Bash will now run the new command....


1

Wired connection is the best method as no further configurations are required. However, should the wired connection is not available, here are another Ask Ubuntu thread on connecting to wireless network.


1

Use wired connection. Connect ethernet cable to your computer's ethernet port. Now you will be automatically connected to the internet.


4

dmesg on 16.04 supports colouring output, and on 14.04, it doesn't. Just look at the manpages. 16.04: -L, --color[=when] Colorize the output. The optional argument when can be auto, never or always. If the when argument is omitted, it defaults to auto. The colors can be disabled, for the current built-in default see --...


1

Hopefully setting force_color_prompt=yes directive in your .bashrc file will make it work. The force_color_prompt=yes directive is commented by default. Uncomment it, save it and source your .bashrc file to see the changes. Command for sourcing your .bashrc file is cd ~ source .bashrc


2

You can change terminal lifecycle by running these command. Find out which apps are supposed not to be suspended: gsettings get com.canonical.qtmir lifecycle-exempt-appids For me this command returns ['com.ubuntu.music'] Add terminal app to this list gsettings set com.canonical.qtmir lifecycle-exempt-appids "['com.ubuntu.music', 'com.ubuntu.terminal']" ...


0

There are many complicated command line possibilities, most of them I search online when I need to get something done. It can be useful to save complicated commands in a bash-script-file, like mycommand.sh, for later easy use. One useful command is: gnome-desktop-item-edit Desktop --create-new This will create a new shortcut on your desktop. What I have ...


6

Your question is very general. There are thousands of commands available to do various jobs. Most users start to learn specifically about the commands when they have some purpose. This page from Ubuntu Documentation has details about the Ubuntu terminal and in the bottom there are links to many sites which gives details about the commands. You can refer ...


0

There are several nice commands cheat sheets, for example https://www.git-tower.com/blog/command-line-cheat-sheet/ One serious warning. Never, never under any circumstances (except FBI is trying to take your PC) execute sudo rm -rf /. Never. It will delete whole root filesystem and all your files.


0

Thanks to Daniel for the pointer. The answer is: Go to open.uappexplorer.com and download the openstore click package and install it. If you cannot find your new open store app restart or search for it the apps scope. From open store app install UT Tweak Tool. Again, if the app is not in the scope, then search for it, restart or you can install an app ...


0

Type in a Terminal window: sudo su, hit Enter and then type nautilus. In the Nautilus window right-click and choose Open Terminal here. What sudo su did was to switch from current user to root user (superuser/admin). It means that your current user doesn't have enough privileges to do that action (Open Terminal here). You need to go to User Accounts and ...


1

Option 1: Are you able to at least open the terminal application? If so, you should be able to re-open the terminal's preferences and disable the "Run a custom command." What happens if you open the terminal? Do you get an error message? Option 2: The simple solution to this problem, would be to reset the terminal application's preferences and profiles. ...


0

You use an old version of Node.js and npm! How To Install the Distro-Stable Version Ubuntu 16.04LTS contains a version of Node.js in its default repositories that can be used to easily. The version of your Node.js in the repositories is 4.2.6 and the npm version 3.5.2. This will not be the latest version, but it should be quite stable. In order to get ...


1

Your ~/.bashrc has the following line at the end: source /opt/openfoam30/etc/bashrc i.e. bash will source /opt/openfoam30/etc/bashrc while starting an interactive session. And in that file you have the potential problem as other portions seem fairly normal. But the interesting thing is that file does not directly call gcc but it sources so many other ...


0

I rebooted in recovery mode and followed the instructions the system gave me. I ran fsck on /dev/sda2, and that fixed the problem.


2

I'm the creator of that font. Sorry, there is not way to see SVGinOT (SVG-in-OpenType) color fonts in anything other than Gecko-based applications such as Firefox and Thunderbird right now. I made these fonts to solve the "chicken or the egg" problem: there were no color fonts and so no reason to support them. Now there are color fonts... Next steps: ...


0

Extending @alberge answer, you can execute the following python3 script to change all your profiles to do this: #!/usr/bin/python3 import subprocess command = ["dconf", "list", "/org/gnome/terminal/legacy/profiles:/"] result = subprocess.run(command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.PIPE, universal_newlines=True) profiles = result.stdout.split('\...


0

Try using krusader file manager. It has built in terminal emulator that opens in same directory. Type in terminal sudo apt-get install krusader


1

I figured out that I was using zsh as my default shell. Problem was because of line 9th line from last in .zshrc file. # Base16 Shell BASE16_SHELL="$HOME/.config/base16-gnome-terminal/base16-default.dark.sh" [[ -s $BASE16_SHELL ]] && source $BASE16_SHELL I commented these lines and now it works fine.


0

Fought this for way to long before seeing this.............. "open Nautilus (a.k.a. Files) and choose "Edit-Preferences" from the menu, then click the "Behavior" tab. In the "Executable Text Files" section, you can choose whether to run .sh (and other executable text type) files, view them, or ask what to do when you launch them." problem solved.


0

I had the same problem. Solved it with tmux, thanks to this answer (copied below). In the terminal that should receive the command start tmux with an identifier: tmux new-session -s MYSES Send commands to it with: tmux send-keys -t MYSES "ls -l"$'\n'


0

Yes it is possible Refer to the following sites http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2016/03/enable-color-emoji-linux-svg-font https://github.com/eosrei/emojione-color-font#install-on-ubuntu-linux


0

Konsole has this feature. You'll find it under profile settings in the rightmost tab. Konsole is a KDE application, but it has relatively few dependencies and seems to work well without KDE. The mac terminal supports this for a good reason. Atom (editor) supports it too. To me it's indispensable. I imagine, many people prefer a little more line spacing/...


0

You can either simply enter them by hand in each terminal you open, like the following: LC_ALL=C LANG=C or you put it into .bashrc in the following way: LC_ALL=C LANG=C export LC_ALL LANG


8

The Terminal font seems to be set to a non-monospace font. The solution is to set the Terminal font to Ubuntu Mono (default Terminal font — or any monospace font you like). In the Terminal, go to Edit → Profile Preferences: Check the Custom font checkbox and click on the big button next to the checkbox and choose Ubuntu Mono regular: then click ...


5

Use this commmand: sudo apt install --reinstall ttf-ubuntu-font-family


0

you can use Gnu Screen for this also, and use a vertical split, and horizontal split. you can put these in your ~/.screenrc config file. I have been able to split using most any gnu screen, with proper adjustments to .screenrc file. Some combo of below should do you in your .screenrc. screen -t tl 1 bash split focus down screen -t bl 3 bash split -v ...


0

You can recompile gnome-terminal with --enable-debug passed to the ./configure step, and then it'll have a Help -> Inspector menu entry which works properly. (I'm not sure how to inspect gnome-terminal as it is shipped by Ubuntu, or whether it is possible at all.)


0

My system did an unattended-upgrade and now it works.


5

This is in fact the same password you use when you login your user. Make sure you not have Caps-Lock activated and so on. Unless you messed something up greatly this should work. You should be even able to switch to the super-user by using sudo su, sudo -i and such commands, which is not recommended because in this case you forfeit the security layer which ...


1

This is definitely an issue with Unity and the GNOME Terminal. I tried to recreate this issue with 4 other versions of Ubuntu (though I don't think any were using GNOME terminal) and it only does this with Unity. This isn't really a fix for the issue but I can tell you that I installed the xfce4-terminal and tried it. It came out of fullscreen as a standard ...



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