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You can do the following: open ~/.bashrc with your favourite editor and add the following lines to the end of the file: if [ -d "/opt/eclipse" ] ; then PATH="/opt/eclipse:$PATH" fi Close and open the terminal. This is what I did in Unity and it worked for me. I am not quite sure if it will work on the Gnome environment.


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Closest solution to my question is proot but it doesn't work as intended. For example when I run it like proot -w ~/mychroot and when I change to parent directory cd .. and run ls it really changes to parent directory, it must have confined in ~/mychroot directory Anyway I found a script in one of the forums and modified it to my needs. In ...


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Probably the easiest option is using wmctrl. You might have to install it first: sudo apt-get install wmctrl then to close a window named "example" (no matter what application it belongs to), use the command: wmctrl -c "example" see also: man wmctrl


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This is some issue in one of the Graphite libraries. See bug #1166125.


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After many hours of searching $ sudo apt-get purge pango-graphite worked for me. This was broken on a dist upgrade to 14.10, and since I spend 90+% of my time in mate-terminal or gnome-terminal this was truly driving me crazy. Thanks!


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This is a confirmed bug (see launchpad) The current work-around is: From a terminal: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install unity dconf reset -f /org/compiz/ This will reinstall unity and reset the config. If that doesn't works then: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install ubuntu-desktop rm -f /home/user/.config/dconf/user but be aware that this ...


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Solution with Terminator from this site. sudo vi /usr/share/terminator/terminatorlib/terminal.py Look for function : on_buttonpress Revert button test (contextual menu go to middle click, paste on right click) : def on_buttonpress(self, widget, event): ... if event.button == 1: ... elif event.button == 3: ... elif ...


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To change your working directory, try using the following command gnome-terminal --working-directory=/path/to/dir You can check whether the changes have taken plac using the pwd command. Alternatively, open "~/.bashrc", scroll to the bottom and add a change directory command - cd ~/mychroot


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What terminal is this? Add the output of echo $TERM to your question. This can happen when you have escape sequences (as generated by tput) in your prompt that are not surrounded by \[ and \]. Those backslashed brackets tell Bash that the escape sequences do not take up any horizontal space on the screen. Without them around the escape sequences, Bash ...


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go to the directory where you want to open in terminal. make sure your cursor in inside in window(where files are displayed). then press Option key. then context menu pops up. now you can select the open in terminal option.


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You will probably have your script named similarly (starting) like an existing application or executable in $PATH (or, as Oli mentions, you forgot to make it executable). Another thing is that it is bad practice to use language extensions in executables in $PATH, see this link


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Even scripts need the executable bit set.


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Does your problem reproduce under different conditions? Can you reproduce the problem under different conditions and benchmark the time it takes to perform various operations (ex: time cat largefile.txt). Example scenarios: using GNU screen instead of tmux; without using a terminal multiplexor; using another terminal emulator (tilda, terminator, rxvt or ...


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Even faster without having to fiddle with chown and chmod: Logged in as the user whose history is not saved: sudo rm ~/.bash_history touch ~/.bash_history Make sure not to type any command between the 2 above


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If it's working from your internal network and not from outside, the normal reason is that the incoming port for you machine (port 22 by default) is closed by a firewall. Which, by the way, is the expected thing. You should contact your office/campus IT administrator and ask them to open the port for you. After that, you must take seriously the security ...


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You should add these values to the end of your /etc/sysctl.conf file, or create a file under /etc/sysctl.d. There are plenty of examples online, but this file is loaded with every boot, so the values are reloaded everytime. The values are most likely defaulted in the kernel config, so you need to reload them. If you want to load them during the current ...


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If the only thing you did was running export SWT_GTK3=0 then you did nothing permanent. What the command does is to set an environment variable SWT_GTK3 and set its value to 0 for that terminal session only. If you close the terminal window and open a new one it will be gone or reset. If you want to unset it in the current terminal window you can also do: ...


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Turns out that the problem was incorrect setting of my locale. My locale was set to en_IL.UTF-8, which apparently isn't recognized/supported. I changed all entries in /etc/default/locales to be en_US.UTF-8, and then logged out and logged in again - now I can type in Hebrew where previously I couldn't.


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It looks like your terminal profile is trying to run an empty shell command - choose the 'Profile Preferences' button and then navigate to the 'Title and Command' tab and make sure that the 'Run a custom command instead of my shell' is not selected (or if it is selected, that it contains the path to a valid shell program)


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I don't think that there is a specific option to fit the image according to the window size. The only options supported by gnome-terminal to modify the background are listed below: $ gconftool-2 --recursive-list /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default | grep background scroll_background = false background_darkness = 0.58315799999999995 background_image = ...


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Determined by trial and error by adding and/or removing options: let g:fzf_launcher='gnome-terminal --disable-factory -x bash -ic %s'


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The window placement is defined by the "Place Windows" Compiz plugin. Try to change the default "smart" setting with "Pace accross all outputs". Type in a terminal the following command to change the placement behaviour: dconf write /org/compiz/profiles/unity/plugins/place/multioutput-mode 3 To restore the default setting: dconf write ...


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Go to "system settings" - "details". There should be an option for default applications. Is terminal in there ?


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Switch between open instances of one program: Alt + ~ or Super + ~ Switch between open tabs of one program instance: Ctrl + Tab Switch between programs: Alt + Tab or Super + Tab



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