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1

It's quite possible that one in the 'package' is a little funky and may not be the font you actually want, which was the case with me. So, I solved this by manually installing the font in my user space. Note that I prefer Inconsolata-dz to pure Inconsolata, if only because of straight format single and double quotes. First, let's set up the directory we ...


1

This happens because the data is initially copied to the buffer (which is a fast process as it involves writing to the memory) and subsequently, the buffer is written to the external device (which is a slower process owing to the fact that the write speeds are much slower). A good way to ensure that the disk has been written to properly before ejecting is ...


1

Ubuntu enables Write Caching for USB media by default, Windows does not (at least in XP and 7). When using Write Chaching, your files are written to a buffer, which is then gradually written to the USB drive. If the whole file has been written to the buffer, the dialog will tell you that it has finished copying, while the OS is still busy moving the files ...


1

Install the dconf-editor sudo apt-get install dconf-editor Start the application and navigate to org.gnome.terminal.legacy Open the category profiles: and select the wrong profile, or check all profiles. In the right hand pane you will see a key custom-command. Remove the value or use the Button Set to Default in the lower pane.


-2

Try running this in MATE: sudo apt-get purge gnome-terminal; sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get install gnome-terminal This will uninstall and purge the configs, then reinstall the latest version.


0

try gconftool-2 --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/font --type string "Ubuntu Mono derivative Powerline 11"


0

Let me answer my question. Download the gnome-terminal source package $ apt-get source gnome-terminal Install the build requires $ sudo apt-get install build-dep gnome-terminal Rollback the change below https://github.com/GNOME/gnome-terminal/commit/468a18f5e21b42ee0efedf3d86203fbc4e02807e Repackage the source code $ tar zcf ...


0

Execute sudo dpkg-reconfigure locales in an alternative terminal emulator and select en_US.UTF-8 UTF-8 , choose it as the default locale. gnome-terminal should work.


0

Here is another way, in case @Tim's answer doesn't work for some reason. Right click in the terminal, then click "Leave full screen".


0

If you have changed the theme, this is lost likely the reason. See the following bug report: Gnome-terminal in Ubuntu Unity shrinks to minimum size If you are using the ambient theme (default), it would be good if you could update the bug report. I had the same issue with zukimac theme, but not with ambient or arc.


0

Try, right click on terminal. Go to Profiles -> Profile Preferencis then left click. You will got new window. On General tab you have option Use custom default terminal size. Check option and change size of terminal. Go to close. Close terminal. Open terminal. New opened terminal will be in size your specified.


4

I don't think you can force the transparency to display only your wallpaper on a system running Unity. The reason can be found in one of the gconf settings of gnome-terminal on 14.04: $ gconftool-2 --long-docs /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/background_type Type of terminal background. May be "solid" for a solid color, "image" for an ...


3

Try installing the overlay-scrollbar type typing in the following from a terminal window: sudo apt-get install overlay-scrollbar From a terminal type in the following to enable the scrollbar overlays: gsettings reset com.canonical.desktop.interface scrollbar-mode overlay-auto To disable the scrollbar overlays, type in: gsettings set ...


-1

I don't understand why nobody mentioned two easy ways to achieve what op asks. First way: cd - #goes back to previous directory cd -- #goes back to previous of previous directory Second way: cd $OLDPWD For more info check out following link http://superuser.com/questions/113219/go-back-to-previous-directory-in-shell EDIT: I found really a nice ...


1

There are two commands to allow you to easily move back and forth between directories: pushd popd For an example, navigate to the first directory with cd: cd /home/aperson/more/path/to/a/very/long/and/annoying/to/type/ Then use pushd to move to the other directory: pushd /home/aperson/more/path/to/a/different/very/long/and/annoying/to/type/ Now when ...


1

The correct syntax must be: PS1="\[\033[0;33m\]\h:\W\u\$\[\033[m\]" Or if you prefer to use \e instead of \033: PS1="\[\e[0;33m\]\h:\W\u\$\[\e[m\]" Your problem in missing \[ with the \e ASCII escape character (033)


1

This is not exactly navigation, but I am guessing what you're looking for is TAB AUTO COMPLETION. This will allow you to get the full part of any directory without having to know it. Here's a great tutorial for this.


0

Another option, that's more akin to the GUI 'cut and paste' idea. cd /long/path/to/wherever/the/file/is/now mv file_to_move /tmp/ cd /destination/directory/somewhere/else/ mv /tmp/file_to_move ./ But really, it involves much more typing than a simple single cp <source> <destination>


0

Yes and no. Yes: You can install a different terminal emulator. The "terminal" itself is the thing you get when pressing ctrl+alt+shift+Fx (actually not right either, those are virtual terminals). You can get a fancier terminal emulator with - transparency - diverse options - color themes - shortcuts - tabs - etc. Also you can change the font. Yiu can ...


2

The simplest, working answer to the question "How to save terminal history manually?": history -a It may also be worth to consider switching to zsh, which has setopt inc_append_history ("save every command before it is executed"). And this question is relevant as well: Is it possible to make writing to .bash_history immediate?


1

There is no support for a transparent gnome-terminal in GNOME 3.14. You need gnome-terminal win the version > 3.15 for that and therefore GNOME 3.16 And as @muru said: To clarify: The upstream version does not support transparency. This is a feature patched in. sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3 sudo add-apt-repository ...


1

The base16-default.dark.sh script in base16-gnome-terminal installs the Base 16 Default Dark profile for the Gnome terminal. In order to actually use it, you need to activate the profile via Terminal → Change Profile → Base 16 Default Dark which applies the profile to the current session. You probably want to use it as default profile. In order to do that, ...


0

tried to run /opt/COMODO/post_setup.sh and it says "Please run this script with adminstrative priviledges even though I am logged in as an adminstrator. Please note that, even you logged in with your admin user as you say this means nothing in Linux, even you have admin privileges, you in really not using those privileges and in really system treats ...


1

This seems to be a problem related to certain fonts. See https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/ttf-liberation/+bug/299158 Changing to Ubuntu Mono font in gnome-terminal solved the problem for me.


2

You need a sequences of Escape characters: echo -e "\e[9mI\e[0m" or using printf printf "\e[9m%s\e[0m\n" "I" Try this: echo -e "\e[9m" Then type some text and reset with: echo -e "\e[0m" Source


1

All sorts of other options apart from q. Open another terminal and kill it from there. Kill it from the System Monitor task list. Close the terminal window. These assume a desktop environment. Also for servers... Ctrl-Alt-F1 (or F6/F7) and log in again to kill. Connect again (Telnet/SSH) and kill. And finally - it is open source, patch it.


3

If you are using gnome-terminal, yes, you can disable that the F10 key opens the menu: Open gnome-terminal's menu with F10 or with the mouse, select Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts, then uncheck "Enable the menu shortcut key (F10 by default)".


1

To also uncheck the Use the system fixed width font checkbox from the command line, use: gconftool-2 --set /apps/gnome-terminal/profiles/Default/use_system_font --type=boolean false Tested on Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.1. Your mileage may vary.


24

TL;DR The standard way to quit htop is F10 or q. Therefore if you can't use F10, use q (lowercase).


18

You always can have the interupt signal keys Ctrl+c. Basically Ctrl+c sends the SIGINT (interrupt) signal, ; by default, this causes the process to terminate. Just like top, htop can be quit by pressing Q. SIGINT The SIGINT signal is sent to a process by its controlling terminal when a user wishes to interrupt the process. This is typically ...


1

TL; DR no with gnome-terminal, but you can do it with [terminator][1]. Install terminator as usual: sudo apt-get install terminator And then run it from the dash, right click, choose "preferences" in the menu, and you can see this: Now if you open multiple tabs you have ...where you can also see a vertical split terminal.


1

TL;DR No. That's (currently) not possible without changes in the source code and I assume that this is not your intention. But the idea has something. I prefer to renounce horizontal space. The only thing you can do is to switch between top and bottom: % gsettings range org.gnome.Terminal.Legacy.Settings tab-position enum 'top' 'bottom' Move ...


4

Since you mention you solved the problem for your specific situation, below a solution for general purpose. Thanks to xdotool's --sync option, it works pretty reliable in the tests I ran; I could "send" commands to specific terminal windows and it ran perfectly without an exception. How it works in practice The solution exists from a script, which can be ...



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