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23

You need Terminator: sudo apt-get install terminator For four terminals at startup, do the following: Start terminator Split the terminal Ctrl+Shift+O Split the upper terminal Ctrl+Shift+O Split the lower terminal Ctrl+Shift+O Open Preferences and select Layouts Click Add and enter a usefull layout name and Enter Close Preferences and Terminator Open ...


10

Sound I can't help you with. However, if you append something like && notify-send "Task complete." after your command, you should see a notification pop up in the upper right corner. If the required package is not installed by default, sudo apt-get install libnotify-bin should get it for you. The && will execute a second command if the ...


6

With Dolphin , KDE's file manager, you have two options: Open a terminal as a panel in the same window. Use the keyboard shortcut F4 or the menu: Control → Panels → Terminal. The working directory is synchronized between the two panels; changing directories in either of the two panels will also change it in the other. Sweet! In this screenshot you ...


5

What you want is sudo apt-get update; alert. What follows is explanation and rationale. From the terminal, you can list many commands to be run in sequence. So what you want is first the command which takes a long time, and second a notification command. To run commands in sequence, you separate them with either && or ;. These have two distinct ...


5

Here is a small overview about the three file managers I know: The file manager Nemo (part of the Cinnamon DE) has a built-in context menu option to both "Open as root" and "Open in a terminal". The file manager Thunar (part of the Xubuntu/XFCE DE) even provides a feature to simply create user defined tasks that appear in the context menu. As an example, ...


4

Personally, I use emacs with M-x ansi-term or M-x shell depending on what I am doing. But if you are looking for just a terminal multiplexer then there is always the quietly revered tmux: http://tmux.sourceforge.net/ Edit: JoKeR pointed out that you can install tmux with apt-get: $ sudo apt-get install tmux


4

Just resize your terminal windows, so they all fit a corner of the screen. The Terminal can also have tabs, which might help out. Right click the window and select New Tab. Here's how to make windows able to resize to corners: Run sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager. Run sudo ccsm or search ccsm in Unity Dash. Scroll down until you find ...


4

You can start 4 Terminals with Ctrl+Alt+T and fit them to the edges o your screen with Ctrl+Shift+Numpad[1,3,7,9] or left/right with Ctrl+Shift+Numpad[4/6] or top/bottom Ctrl+Shift+Numpad[8/2] and switch with Alt+Tab to ONE Terminal and with Alt+^ (on my keyboard its the key above Tab) between the terminals if one is active Or you can use tabs with ...


4

Just to leave the answer here to those who are still chasing this. I guess I have learned my lesson in misunderstanding 256 color support in a way. So I found my answer here. To sum it up, themes like Gotham offers 256 support, and I had in mind that it would go both ways in terms of appearances (terminal and gui). This is not the case of course, one would ...


3

As another alternative, I would suggest using byobu. Byobu is a GPLv3 open source text-based window manager and terminal multiplexer. It was originally designed to provide elegant enhancements to the otherwise functional, plain, practical GNU Screen, for the Ubuntu server distribution. Byobu now includes an enhanced profiles, convenient keybindings, ...


3

The default video driver for KVM/qemu libvirt type VMs is the cirrus driver and that is the root issue. Years ago, there were problems with the vmvga driver, and cirrus was made the default. Issues with the vmvga driver have long since been fixed. For a new VM defintion, specify the vmvga driver. To fix an existing VM then use virsh edit and change this ...


3

Create the script bellow , make it executable with chmod +x scriptname, where script name is actual script name. Run the script with 4 parameters. For example, I run it with activetab.sh TAB-1 TAB-2 TAB-3 TAB-4. You can call tabs anything you want, TAB-1 is just example. You will be prompted for which tab you want to focus on, type it exactly as you've ...


2

Doesn't seem to exist and there's no need to figure out nasty workarounds. I opened feature request/bug 1442159 to get developer feedback.


2

Programs use a variety of other programs to determine the default browser sensible-browser & xdg-open being two of them. For xdg-open, you can use it simply by by running xdg-open http://URL, so xdg-open https://www.google.co.uk will open Google for instance.This should be the same as running echo https://www.google.co.uk in terminal and clicking on the ...


2

You have two ways to upgrade your terminal from 3.6.2 (stable) to the latest 3.12.3 and read step by step do not run apt-upgrade unless you done installing. 1st solution with Gnome3/staging PPA sudo add-apt-repository ppa:gnome3-team/gnome3-staging sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install --reinstall gnome-terminal 2nd solution with this PPA: sudo ...


2

That's because --active is a window option; if used before the first --window or --tab argument, it sets the default for all windows. On top of that, that parameter sets the last specified tab as the active one in its window... (which is the default anyway) So what you want to do is impossible.... (For a certain definition of "impossible"; this is ...


2

You can change the system alerts sound level by this way: Go to the "gear cog" in the upper right corner of the screen. Select System settings... Click on Sound. Click on the Sound Effects tab. Lower the Alert volume to a comfortable level (or mute it). Here you're a screenshot:


2

I think you mean this: spd-say "$(date)"


2

It is gnome-terminal itself that sets these variables. The relevant code resides in gnome-terminal's source, src/terminal-util.c, method terminal_util_add_proxy_env(). The values are taken from Gnome's settings, and the feature serves the purpose to have Gnome's proxy settings take effect on as many apps/utilities as possible, including console ones.


2

Answered here I quote: The user title code was removed1 from gnome-terminal 3.14. There's only one way to set the title, using an escape sequence - e.g. with bash: PROMPT_COMMAND='echo -ne "\033]0;YOUR TITLE GOES HERE\007"' 1: see gnome bug 724110 and gnome bug 740188.


2

Setting $PROMPT_COMMAND as shown above has zero effect here. No surprise, because Bash runs inside the terminal and parent processes (here: gnome-terminal) can't read a child's environment on a unix-like OS. Using something more simple, like PROMPT_COMMAND='echo bla' Executes echo bla, nothing else happens. Edit: one has to wrap this in escape ...


2

It's not possible with current gnome-terminal. If you're not afraid of recompiling it from source, well, there's a patch available at https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=709109.


2

Yes, the typical shortcut for copy and paste on the terminal (not only on gnome and not even only on gnu/linux is ctr + shift + v. Ctrl + c is Interrupt/Kill whatever you are running (SIGINT). It would not be prudent to change that. These shortcuts are older than Ctrl + c, ctrl + v. A more elaborate and better answer is here: ...


1

First of all I'd like to confirm what you've already figured out, namely that directly under gnome-terminal (that is, outside of tmux or screen) you should set TERM=xterm-256color, whereas inside tmux or screen it should be set to TERM=screen-256color. Apparently your .zshrc segment properly sets it for the shell that's run directly by gnome-terminal. I'm ...


1

Now I've investigated this for the better part of a day and finally found a way to set this title. It's done via escape sequences which start with \e]0; and end with a BEL character ( = \007 = \a). Unlike I stated above, communications from the shell back to the terminal application is possible, very limited, through such escape sequences (there are a few ...


1

I can't believe they removed such a user friendly feature like this one. I'm switching to ROXTerm (http://roxterm.sourceforge.net), which does the job nicely. It's packaged in Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install roxterm Then, let the dinosaur continue its own way ;-)


1

I installed Gramp and tried it here, and this should really work: Exec=/bin/bash -c "LANGUAGE=en_GB gramps" LANGUAGE= takes precedence over LANG= Note Make sure you run the application from the local .desktop file: After editing the local one, make sure you log out / in before running it again.


1

A more generic way, compared to playing with a .desktop file, ~/.bashrc, etc., is to create the file ~/bin/gramps and give it this contents: #!/bin/sh export LANGUAGE=en_GB exec /usr/bin/gramps $@ Also run chmod +x ~/bin/gramps. Then, next time you log in, English will be the display language however you start gramps.


1

If I understood correctly e.g. nautilus ~ were ~ is your home folder and can be replaced by the folder you have in mind.


1

For gnome-terminal Edit the profile settings in gnome-termninal: Replace /bin/bash with your shell command and use your parameter for TERM. You can also edit the entries with dconf. Open a terminal and start dconf-editor: dconf-editor Open the entry org/gnome/terminal/legacy/profiles: and select your profile. Change the value for custom-command.



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