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From man gnome-terminal: -x, --execute Execute the remainder of the command line inside the termi‐ nal. When sh -c xinput set-prop 10 "Device Enabled" 0 is evaluated in order to be executed, sh is interpreted as the executable to be run, and the arguments to sh are splitted on spaces; so xinput is intepreted as ...


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By default, standard Ubuntu with Unity Desktop comes with the terminal emulators gnome-terminal and the more basic xterm. Normally the shortcut Ctrl+Alt+T should bring up one, usually the gnome-terminal. You can also search in the Dash's application lens for terminal emulators: No idea why it shows the Sudoku there... :D In case you (or anybody else) ...


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[Adding an answer since the accepted one no longer works.] GNOME Terminal has flip flopped several times on this subject. This configuration feature was removed in gnome-terminal 3.14 (included in Ubuntu 15.04 Vivid) https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=727743 https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=730632 Then in gnome-terminal 3.16 (included ...


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See also "keeping persistent history in bash" for another alternative. It rigs your prompt to send all commands ever typed into any terminal into a "persistent history" file (alongside what's usually done for the regular .history).


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Great solution by Walter Tross, but if you don't want to do all the job, here is the download link: FixedsysExcelsiorIIIb-L2_Mono.ttf


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No, the terminal is not a text editor (even though it can be used as one). The terminal is a program where you can issue commands to your system. Commands are nothing but binaries (executables in the form of binary language) and scripts located in specific paths of your system. Each command executes one specific task. There are a few text editors for the ...


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Open System Settings and go into User Accounts. Select your user, and there should now be an option on the right to enable automatic login. Turn that on and you're done.


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As taken from SuperUser.com, The process is a little complex to explain here since it is different for every shell you use. Rather I'll give you two links: How to Change the Title of an xterm (Comprehensive instructions for many different shells) Show the current Command in your Bash window Title. A nice step by step procedure on how the author went on ...


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The title can be set using escape sequences as shown in How to change xterm title. ( Specifically for bash ). In their example, they use case statement that sets PS1 with an enclosed escape sequence. case $TERM in xterm*) PS1="\[\033]0;\u@\h: \w\007\]bash\\$ " ;; *) PS1="bash\\$ " ;; esac The basic idea is to ...


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You could install and use xttitle (Note the doubled t in the name). I use it like this in a file sourced by my ~/.bashrc: # from the "xttitle(1)" man page - put info in window title update_title() { [ $TERM = xterm -o $TERM = xterm-color ] && xttitle "[$$] ${USER}@${HOSTNAME}:$PWD" } cd() { [ -z "$*" ] && builtin cd $HOME [ -n ...



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