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0

I think newer Gedit versions work with Python 3 instead of 2. So you might want to change the loader in SplitView.plugin. Change line 2 from Loader=python to Loader=python3


-1

i think add spell checker plugin in gedit 1st of all open gedit.then Click preferences inside edit button.then click plugin button, and then add spell checker plugin


5

You are running a graphical program (gedit) with sudo which usually is for command line use. There is a problem defining a graphical environment for root in this case. It is preferably to use gksudo for running graphical programs.


0

At least for Ubuntu 14.04, there is a regex plugin available from the gedit-developers-plugins package. If this package doesn't work for you, as it didn't work for me, here is the solution.


0

You can highlight, copy and paste a 'tab' from your file into the search and replace fields to achieve this in either direction tabs>spaces or spaces>tabs.


1

What you want to do there is not possible. You are probably using an X11 forward and here you need to understand, that the process of Gedit itself starts on the server, and its only a projection of the application that you see (like a video on youtube, with the only difference that this one responds to your actions). For this particular reason it no wonder ...


0

You should place the plugin in $HOME/.local/share/gedit/plugins and after (re)starting Gedit it should be available in Edit=>Preferences=>Plugins


1

The PPA ppa:rabbitvcs/ppa doesn't contain Vivid packages. Therefore you can't install rabbitvcs via this PPA. rabbitvcs-nautilus is also in the Ubuntu repositories sudo apt-get install rabbitvcs-nautilus Output of apt-cache policy rabbitvcs-nautilus rabbitvcs-nautilus: Installed: 0.16-1 Candidate: 0.16-1 Version table: *** 0.16-1 0 ...


-1

2 possibilities I can think of: Sudo ain't giving you "full" root rights. Sudo is just executing stuff with root's rights while still being you - roughly speaking. (It also does not require root password, but sudo password, this might even be the password of the user who is "sudo-ing") It might fix your problem if you try to become root: do "su" in the ...


0

To write a number to a system file you do it like this: echo "5" | sudo tee /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness or sudo tee /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/brightness <<< "5" But in your case it may be not acpi_video0 but intel_backlight. Depending on your laptop model and video adapter this issue can be fixed by adding kernel boot ...


0

run ll /sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0 and you'll probably get something like this % ll /sys/class/backlight/intel_backlight/ total 0 -r--r--r-- 1 root root 4096 Jul 6 14:01 actual_brightness -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4096 Jul 6 14:01 bl_power -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4096 Jul 6 14:01 brightness lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Jul 6 14:01 device -> ...


1

I had the same problem and found out that ~/.config/gedit is not enabled for writing. So you have two options. This is cumbersome, but you could always start gedit as super user via terminal sudo -b gedit. You can change the permissions of ~/.config/gedit and all of its contents: sudo chmod -R 760 ~/.config/gedit


1

The cleanest solution would be of course to edit the code of gedit. Since that seems out of reach, the solution below is a workaround. If the path information of recently used gedit files is important to you, the soluution can be used as a replacement of gedit's own "recently used" overview. It gives you the information, exactly as it appears on your ...


1

A quick hack, just open all files you think you want, then at the top right menu you can find the path of each file, so you can keep what you want and close others.



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