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The following command you should have done already as you folowwed the tutorial how to downgrade to lower version of gedit (if not do it aswell): sudo apt-get build-dep gedit Then run the following: sudo apt-get build-dep gedit-plugins sudo apt-get install libvte* python-vte libgconf* Then I assume you used /usr/local as prefix to build your gedit do: ...


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Have you tried downloading the right version of the package compiled for an older release and installing it manually? http://www.ubuntuupdates.org/package/core/trusty/universe/base/gedit-plugins for 3.10.1-1ubuntu2 from 14.04 http://www.ubuntuupdates.org/package/core/vivid/universe/base/gedit-plugins for 3.10.1-1ubuntu3 from 14.10 You can either use the ...


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In gedit 3.18 text wrapping can be turned on and off from the status bar.


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My answer is heavily based on this post: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2011495 An alias does not work like that, arguments are always passed to the end of the command. Using your alias as an example, gedit filename will actually run the following: gedit $@ > /dev/null 2>&1 & filename instead of gedit filename > /dev/null ...


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This is a known bug: Launchpad: Gedit didn't close after saving a new file which has a fix released upstream: Bug 734068 - gedit should quit after saving through "Save before closing?" dialog An annoying bug that at the moment has only recompiling and patching as an option. Patch is here...


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Imho GEdit is far from being an ideal base for an IDE. You would be better off with an actual IDE like Eclipse and its various plug-ins. In my experience it's also better to use IDEs specialized to a particular language, task set, or framework like JetBrains' IDEA (Java), PyCharm (Python), WebStorm (JavaScript, non-free), and CLion (C/C++, non-free) – they ...


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You can use vipe to edit pipelines: SYNOPSIS command1 | vipe | command2 DESCRIPTION vipe allows you to run your editor in the middle of a unix pipeline and edit the data that is being piped between programs. Your editor will have the full data being piped from command1 loaded into it, and when you save, that data will be ...


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When starting an application from the command line, you can avoid verbose output in the terminal after starting the application by using the NOHUP flag before the command and an ampersand following the command. For example, in this instance you would use: nohup gedit & or nohup gedit If you need sudo permission, you should use sudo -i instead of ...


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LibreOffice Write would be massively too heavy for you I suspect but well worth a look is Abiword which has the features you are after: Relatively lightweight Highlights bad spelling Allows right click suggestions for spelling I would say that it is not as fast as Leafpad but the extra features do come at a price. Abiword is certainly fast enough on my ...


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If you want to use gedit, open a terminal : strg+alt+t and type gksu gedit /etc/fstab. If gksu ist not installed run sudo apt-get install gksu to install it. An alternative would be using an command line editor like nano, in the terminal type: sudo nano /etc/fstab.


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Save the file somewhere as program.cpp then open a terminal and cd to the directory you saved the file. To compile the program with gcc run gcc -o program program.cpp. If there are no errors in the program this will output a binary with your compiled program called program which you can run with ./program in the terminal.



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