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it's the same issue in the following link Getting + installing gcc/g++ 4.9 on Ubuntu? it says , download all these: binutils_2.24-3_amd64.deb cpp-4.9_4.9-20140218-1_amd64.deb g++-4.9_4.9-20140218-1_amd64.deb gcc-4.9_4.9-20140218-1_amd64.deb gcc-4.9-base_4.9-20140218-1_amd64.deb libasan1_4.9-20140218-1_amd64.deb libatomic1_4.9-20140218-1_amd64.deb ...


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You can usually do this by passing --prefix=/path/to/empty/folder to configure. This will put the installed components into your previously-empty folder in the correct structure once you run make install. Then, you can copy all the contents of this folder onto your target system.


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Install g++. This can be done e.g. by sudo apt-get install g++ Not sure whether you really need a particular version. In most cases system default should be ok for it.


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You need to install g++ or some similarly named package to compile c++ code.


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You basically need to depend on g++-4.8: Build-Depends: g++-4.8


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Use these specific environment variables: export ROOTLIBDIR=your-root-lib-path export ROOTINCDIR=your-root-headers-path Reference: VINCIA ROOT Interface Linking


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The linpack.gcda file should get created when you execute the program that you compiled with the profile flags. Since you didn't supply an output file name (using the -o option) on the gcc command line, you will need to execute it as a.out. For example: $ gcc -fprofile-arcs -ftest-coverage -O2 hello.c $ ls hello.* hello.c hello.gcno $ $ ./a.out Hello ...


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which which gives location of binary installation directory. It is used as which <pkgname> So the command which gcc gives /usr/bin/gcc dpkg -i dpkg -i is used for installation.It has nothing to do with finding a package directory. dpkg -l dpkg -l is used to find if a package is installed or not.dpkg -l <pkgname> will give ...



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