Hot answers tagged

3

You haven't told g++ where to find them: by default, it only looks in the top-level /usr/include directory, whereas the headers you are trying to include are in a gtk-2.0 subdirectory. You can either add the include path manually e.g. gcc -I /usr/include/gtk-2.0 test.c or (the recommended way) use pkg-config to pull the required paths and flags directly ...


1

Here is the finished file (setup-gcc.sh): #################################### echo Stage 1 - Building Dependencies #################################### # make a working directory cd $HOME/Documents rm -rf Cross mkdir Cross cd Cross # install or update all apt-get dependencies sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install gcc ...


1

This answer was lifted from the vmware community forum and describes manually compiling the VMWare services because the kernel being used is newer than the distro available. cd /usr/lib/vmware/modules/source unpack vmnet.tar cd vmnet-only make cd .. unpack vmmon.tar cd vmmon-only make cd .. cp vmmon.o /lib/modules/`uname -r`/misc/vmmon.ko cp vmnet.o ...


1

First run these commands sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install build-essential sudo apt-get install aptitude and then try sudo apt-get install libstdc++6 or try this search result and install one desired package from listed http://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=libstdc%2B%2B


1

There isn't actually a package called libstdc++ (possibly you are trying to install libstdc++6?) When apt doesn't find an exact match to a package name, it treats the given string as a regular expression. In this case the ++ causes it to try to install any package whose name matches libstd followed by one or more c - many of which conflict, as you can see. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible