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0

The repository you have added (probably this one) has GCC 4.8.1 only. You can either find a repository which provides GCC 4.8.2 for Ubuntu 10.04, compile it from source, or upgrade to 14.04.


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It looks like you can download any version of GLIBC here: http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/libc/ Then just link like any other I would think..


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The asm/errno.h header is provided by a variety of packages. Odd that gcc would require it, but you can try: sudo apt-get install linux-libc-dev You also need to tell GCC to look for an architecture and OS specific location for the headers: ../configure --build=x86_64-linux-gnu (or i386-linux-gnu for 32-bit Ubuntu). It's highly recommended when ...


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You can continue using the new g++, and specify the standard to be used: -std= Determine the language standard. This option is currently only supported when compiling C or C++. For 12.04, man g++ says: gnu++98 GNU dialect of -std=c++98. This is the default for C++ code. So compile your code with: g++ --std=gnu++98 However, man g++ on ...


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You can install g++ 4.4, 4.6 or 4.7 from the package g++-4.X. (Then compile your program with g++-4.X instead of just g++.) For reference, the default g++ version in Ubuntu 12.04 is 4.6.


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If you have a .cpp file, you can compile it with g++ and then run the compiled file. For example: g++ testfile.cpp -o testfile (The -o option tells the compiler (g++) the executable output file's name. In fact, you can change the output filename to whatever you want apart from source file name.) Then you can execute the compiled file with: ./testfile ...


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In Ubuntu you can append --help onto most commands to see more information about how to run them. In this case: $ g++ --help Usage: g++ [options] file... Options: .... You can also look at man g++ which will tell you lots more but here's the synopsis: SYNOPSIS gcc [-c|-S|-E] [-std=standard] [-g] [-pg] [-Olevel] [-Wwarn...] ...


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I think this is what you are looking for: open terminal with Ctrl+Alt+T enter which [name] (replace [name] with whatever you want) This 'which' will show you where the eecutable is saved. (something similar to /usr/bin[name]) If no message is displayed it isn't installed. To execute the programm enter [name] (replace [name] again with whatever you want) ...


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The Dash only searches for GUI programs. To use a command line program like g++ open a Terminal, either using the Dash or pressing Ctrl+Alt+T, and call the program there.


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I got tired of the error and just uninstalled java. That worked. A little extreme, but with such a small memory quota, the java VM would always be pretty useless anyway.



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