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I'm sure you have sorted this out already, so this is for anybody with similar request run the "change ownership" command on your webroot folder: sudo chown manny -R www This will make you the owner replace "manny" with your username, enabling you to write/read within www folder


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IMO you are best off using one of two options. First would be some sort of virtualization, for example lxc , openvz, or KVM. This option gives the most separation. Your second, and perhaps better option, is to use a feature called "home directories". sudo a2enmod userdir Restart apache2 daemon with following command sudo service apache2 restart Ceate ...


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Yes, you can add ip_conntrack_ftp to /etc/modules. Be attentive, you don't have to enter the modprobe command, just the name of kernel module!


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According to your configuration, you should change AuthOrder mod_auth_file.c by AuthOrder mod_auth_pam.c* mod_auth_unix.c Because mod_auth_file.c is made only for use the proftpd special auth file. You can consult AuthOrder options here ==> Proftpd AuthOrder directive


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You should can try sftp, but if you need ftp then you need to setup and ftp server vsftpd is an FTP daemon available in Ubuntu. It is easy to install, set up, and maintain. To install vsftpd you can run the following command: sudo apt-get install vsftpd Click here for more details on FTP Server setup


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Ok here goes my best shot at explaining this.First of all root is like what the System user name would be. It has the highest level of permissions available. Some apps require you to run them as root in order to unlock their full potential (i.e. to carry out tasks regularly unavailable to just an administrator/user) Secondly, user is kind of a generic term ...


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root: is a special account which is usually locked in Ubuntu. This account is in effect the ultimate super user and can change anything on the system. If you want to enable this account you can but its not recommended see How to enable root login? For how this can be done and a discussion on why its not recommended. user: These are the users of your ...


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Check in /etc/vsftpd.conf is write_enable=YES


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What you are doing is connecting with FTP over SSH (that's what SFTP is). So you are only able to do the operations that your user is permitted to do over SSH - if your user doesn't own or doesn't belong to a group that has write permissions on the files you are trying to edit or the folders you are trying to create files in, you won't be able to do this ...


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Have you tried executing the command ls -l on the folder tou want to read/write on? The user you connect with might not have enough rights. This is usually the case when another user has created the files you want to access. While ls -l lets you check who is the owner of the file/directory you want to access, to change permissions you can use chmod (more ...


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In case someone is still searching for an answer, from the documentation of Proftpd : Filesystem Tricks A typical scenario is one where "DefaultRoot ~" is used to restrict users to their home directories, and where the administrator would like to have a shared upload directory, say /var/ftp/incoming, in each user's home directory. Symbolic links ...



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