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Open the file /etc/vsftpd.conf - sudo nano /etc/vsftpd.conf Change the pam_service_name entry so that it becomes - pam_service_name=ftp Press CTRL+X followed by Y to save. Restart vsftpd - sudo service vsftpd restart Alternatively, you may reinstall vsftpd - sudo apt-get remove vsftpd sudo rm /etc/pam.d/vsftpd sudo apt-get install vsftpd This has ...


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Now Muru's excellent 100% correct answer in human speak: If you want access yourself to your own machine, sudo apt-get install ssh is all you need! If you want to allow other people into your machine, better create another (sub) directory and limit those users to that directory! ;-)


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Both guides are for securing SSH access and limiting users to an SFTP-only chroot. For just SFTP access, all you need to do is: sudo apt-get install ssh Nothing more.


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Hm, of course it was not an Ubuntu error. I moved to a new flat recently, and the router the internet provider gave me was the culprit. I logged into the router, and saw it had a firewall switched to a default security level verbosely called "medium". I set it to security level "low", and now both FTP and browser connections via non-standard ports work ...


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Try disabling the WMM on your router and check your download speed, Just google on to, how to disable WMM ?


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This answer is based on the tip Rmano gave at the end of his answer, even though the file access control list method didn't work. It didn't work, because the full path, e.g. /path/to/dir requires at least read+execute permission: sudo chmod -R g+rx /path. This solved my issue, and I can now access the symbolic link in A's home directory, and write to the ...


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I prefer vsftpd in Ubuntu. They have a guide with the anonymous access configuration. This is taken from https://help.ubuntu.com/10.04/serverguide/ftp-server.html By default vsftpd is configured to only allow anonymous download. During installation a ftp user is created with a home directory of /home/ftp. This is the default FTP directory. If you wish to ...


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If your directory is in an ext4 filesystem, you can use ACL. Best explained by example; my user is romano and the other user is default. As romano: [romano:~/tmp] % mkdir -p a/b/c/d [romano:~/tmp] % cd !$ cd a/b/c/d [romano:~/tmp/a/b/c/d] % touch f1 [romano:~/tmp/a/b/c/d] % ls -l total 0 -rw-rw-r-- 1 romano romano 0 nov 27 17:15 f1 Obviously I can ...



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