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5

Because those values aren't UUIDs; they're NTFS serial numbers. They're identified as UUIDs in /etc/fstab (and elsewhere) because the developers chose to use the identifier "UUID" for fundamentally non-UUID data, rather than use some other identifier. The same is true of FAT, by the way, but FAT serial numbers are even shorter than NTFS serial numbers.


2

The Microsoft filesystems (NTFS and the FAT brothers) don't support UUIDs the way ext*/btrfs/other Unixy filesystems do. What you see reported as UUIDs are some sort of serial numbers (64 bits long for NTFS, 32 bits long for FAT32). The only concrete information I can dig up from the Linux world is from the ntfslabel(8) manpage: ...


2

Try this: Make your script: make a new text document and put this in: #!/bin/sh mkdir -p /path/to/custom-mount sudo umount /dev/sdaX ((This is the drive you want to mount in the custom location)) sudo mount -t filesystem-type -o rw /dev/sdaX /path/to/custom-mount Put this script under /etc/init.d. Make it executable by running sudo chmod -x ...


1

If you use the nofail option in /etc/fstab, the system will look for your disk (and partition) on boot time. If the device is plugged, the filesystem will be mounted. If not, the boot will continue as normal. See arch wiki: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fstab Example UUID=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX /myusbhdd ntfs nofail,auto,noatime,rw,user 0 0 ...


1

I solved the same problem by adding the UID info as an admin user from my Linux machine, so my /etc/fstab line now looks like this: //192.168.1.X/Multimedia /media/dungeonmultimedia cifs uid=[linuxadminuser],username=[nasadminuser],password=[nasadminpass] 0 0


1

Easy: Remove the following lines from fstab: # #Bind mounts for AeroFS to sync outside it's folder: # /home/user/Desktop /home/user/AeroFS/Desktop none bind 0 0 /home/user/Documents /home/user/AeroFS/Documents none bind 0 0 /home/user/Music /home/user/AeroFS/Music none bind 0 0 /home/user/Pictures ...


1

According to the community wiki: As of Ubuntu 14.04 and for ext4, the above is not required as acl are already default: sudo tune2fs -l /dev/sdaX |grep acl Default mount options: user_xattr acl So, neither, since you're using 14.04 and ext4. However, if you absolutely must change the mount options: There should be no space after the comma. It ...



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