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2

Mounting your Windows filesystems read-only seems a little more straight-forward to me than the umask option: UUID=3E98352E9834E655 /mnt/hiro1 ntfs ro,noauto 0 0 UUID=24F62FADF62F7E64 /mnt/hiro2 ntfs ro,noauto 0 0 I also made separate mount-points for each filesystem, in case you ever wanted to have them both mounted at the same time


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I see an issue but it may just be a misprint .. the line should be : //freenas/mast/ /media/plexshare cifs guest,uid=1000,iocharset=utf8 0 0 you have a space after uid and iocharset and it should be a comma As you mentioned you are getting an error about only being able to mount as root. I also suggested trying //freenas/mast/ /media/plexshare cifs ...


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Ok so after lots of reading: Since Ubuntu 15.04, fstab entries are converted into systemd units (*.mount files found under /run/systemd/generator) by systemd-fstab-generator and are then mounted in no particular order, which is why mine was failing. However systemd supports dependencies, and these can be specified using the fstab option ...


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As a general rule, it's inadvisable (at best) to make /root a separate partition from the root (/) filesystem. The reason is that this is the root user's home directory, and it's critical that this location remain accessible even in the event of a severe problem, such as damage to the /etc/fstab file. I don't know if that's related to your problem, but it ...


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After you've installed Ubuntu, it will never do anything to modify those Windows drives unless you explicitly tell it to. In reality, I would never even worry about modifying your fstab file, but keeping the 'noauto' flag won't hurt anything and will, in fact, prevent Ubuntu from trying to mount the drives automatically (just in case, I suppose)



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