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To mount your share with Linux First of all, you can add the nofail option in your fstab line, so that the system does not complain if it does not find your network share. If that happens, you will have to manually mount after booting your windows machine, for example with a sudo mount -a. But there is another approach that I tend to advise in such cases : ...


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Mountpoints for other partitions should be in /media Make a new mountpoint for your NTFS partition: mkdir /media/windows or if not windows then whatever you prefer to call it Now edit your fstab to correspond to that mountpoint: UUID=5CB5FBB62D2AA5D5 /media/windows ntfs rw,auto,users,exec,nls=utf8,umask=003,gid=46,uid=1000 0 0 On reboot the ...


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One way to add your command at startup would be to add it as a cron job. Add your command to the root cron by typing in the following line in a terminal window: sudo crontab -e then at the bottom of the cron add a line that reads like this: @reboot /bin/mount -a or if you want to add a delay of like 10 seconds to it: @reboot /bin/bash -c 'sleep 10 &...


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While Manuel seems to have answered the asked question quite fully, the question you seem to have meant to ask was: "After I unmounted a disk /dev/vdc1 from /Data and formatted it to XFS, I can't remount it. How do I remount it at /Data?" You seem to be misunderstanding (reasonably) the error message help text that results, which is what's caused ...


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Disks GUI program controls fstab. You can go there and put your partitions mount options on automatic by switching it off and on again. I think it will rebuild your fstab to the default mode.



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