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Keep in mind there are no IPv6 "local ranges" - each IPv6 "local range" is its own (at least) /64 segment of v6 addresses in a specifically defined prefix. As such, any 'private range' address you receive is going to be specific to the subnet your router sets you up on rather than the external v6 address you have (there's logic inside routers to set up the ...


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If I understand, you will block more then 3 fail connection on some service on server? You can do that with iptables - firewall sudo iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -i eth0 -m state --state NEW -m recent --set sudo iptables -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -i eth0 -m state --state NEW -m recent --update --seconds 60 --hitcount 4 -j DROP This rule will ...


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This is what I had to do. 1) Do a netstat to find the PID of kodi.bin on the Local Kodi server sudo netstat -lp --inet 2) Then get the pid and do a grep on it, this will tell me the udp and tcp ports it uses. sudo netstat -lp --inet | grep "$7609/" Link to example of it


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Your question looks really broad, however just to mention that "Ubuntu has pre installed firewall and a Set of Rules what so called "IPTABLES". You can do sudo ufw status #this gives you the status if firewall is active or inactive or sudo ufw enable #enables the firewall or sudo ufw -h #displays all possible options To enable ...


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Before opening up ports, try turning off the firewall and see whether it works then. If not you've got another problem. If turning off the firewall works, turn it back on and add 8200 and 1900 (That's what I have for miniDLNA and it works flawlessly). By the way: UPnP is not needed to make DLNA work.


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Should be pretty easy with UFW. Assuming your range is something like 192.168.1.x it would be something like sudo ufw allow from 192.168.1.0/24 to any port 22 sudo ufw allow from 192.168.1.0/24 to any port 80 sudo ufw allow from 192.168.1.0/24 to any port 443 If you want to limit access to an exact IP address it would be something like sudo ufw allow ...


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You can't explicitly restrict "all incoming connections not originating from OpenVPN" ... you can restrict by port number, which often strongly correlates to the application - but there's no way for the local machine to know WITH ABSOLUTE CERTAINTY what the source of the connection is. That said, since this stuff all runs under what are presumed to be ...


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nmap shows open ports if the server is listening on that port on the interface scanned. As you can see from the netstat output, no process is listening on port 80.



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