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If you want to redirect all traffic to VPN, then do sudo route del default sudo route add default dev ppp0 You can also set it up in ppp config by adding option replacedefaultroute


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You have to delete the deny rule as the deny rule will trump the allow rule. Because the deny is still in place, allow will not work.


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These NetworkManager errors and UFW blocking are related to router solicitation messages. ICMPv6 TYPE=133 are your host originating requests for IPv6 configuration. If you use IPv6, add a rule in (g)ufw: Policy: Allow, Direction: Out, To: ff02::2 and the messages won't appear any more. If you don't use IPv6, disable it by following the answer to this ...


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No. When you make your Ubuntu server into a firewall/router, it does become a complete firewall protecting your entire LAN (Local Area Network) from the WAN (Wide Area Network), or internet in general. The quaility of that protection depends on how good and complete your iptables rules set is. Now, and if I understand correctly, you are asking if your ...


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firewalld can be controlled through the firewall-cmd tool. To open port 22 temporarily use: sudo firewall-cmd --add-port=22/tcp To add it permanently (so it remains open when you reboot), you will also need to use: sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=22/tcp


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Firewall-applet is a tray applet for firewalld. Check to see if firewalld is running on your host. Firewall-applet and firewalld are both installed separately, so there is a good chance when you remove firewall-applet, firewalld is still installed and running. ps -ef | grep firewalld if it is running, you can remove it by typing in: sudo apt-get remove ...


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Based on your comments, I think you've failed to understand what ufw is, and what the scope of coverage is for software firewalls on individual systems. This is a breakdown of the situation, and provides insight into the specifics of ufw and the rules on a network: ufw will only affect one system - the system it's enabled on. That is to say, Ubuntu ...


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I don't fully understand your iptables listing, or how it came to be so. However, there does appear to be nat and mangle tables, and therefore it is entirely conceivable that your problem packets do not traverse the normal INPUT chain, but rather are directed through the iptables via another path at the prerouting stage (which would only be traversed once ...


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Most of the time, whatever the firewall tool you use, the low level firewalling stuff is made with iptables. So with iptables -L, you should be able to tell if there is a firewall running. Not making one. Just checking. Unless you use nftables, but this could hardly be the case.


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iptables (or ufw, which is just a front end for iptables) would do what you want. The default response timeout for UDP packets is 30 seconds (or very close to it). So you would just need to allow the answer related packet back in and DROP the rest (the below assumes your external IF is eth0): sudo iptables -A INPUT -i eth0 -d your_external_IP_address -m ...


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Quoted from this perfect answer ISC ntpd (the ntp package) will open UDP 123 on all your interfaces regardless of what you do with it. It will work anyway even if you block this port in iptables, assuming that you're allowing responses to established traffic as usual - your outbound mobilization requests to your chosen servers will be enough to allow ...


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How does your computer get its IP address? If it is via DHCP, then you need to allow UDP replies to port 68 (or from port 67, see later on): sudo iptables -A INPUT -p udp --sport 67 --dport 68 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT If your objective is to just allow website browsing, then the connection would always be initiated from your end so ...



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