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You could monitor the output of netstat. the flags -tpan allow viewing which program uses which port. In theory you could write a simple script that constantly checks number of those connections with grep, and if the number of connections have changed, you could get a notification. Note, that sshd won't be shown unless you run that command with sudo, so the ...


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Below is a guide I found on Airvpn forums. It was very helpful in understanding the same problem I had. In the following quick tutorial I will try to give you some guidance to get a simple setup (hopefully) working. This is only for general guidance. Adjust addresses, port numbers and protocols as needed. E.g. If your router is on a different IP-address ...


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These NetworkManager errors and UFW blocking are related to router solicitation messages. ICMPv6 TYPE=133 are your host originating requests for IPv6 configuration. If you use IPv6, add a rule in (g)ufw: Policy: Allow, Direction: Out, To: ff02::2 and the messages won't appear any more. If you don't use IPv6, disable it by following the answer to this ...


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Based on your comments, I think you've failed to understand what ufw is, and what the scope of coverage is for software firewalls on individual systems. This is a breakdown of the situation, and provides insight into the specifics of ufw and the rules on a network: ufw will only affect one system - the system it's enabled on. That is to say, Ubuntu ...


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Firewall-applet is a tray applet for firewalld. Check to see if firewalld is running on your host. Firewall-applet and firewalld are both installed separately, so there is a good chance when you remove firewall-applet, firewalld is still installed and running. ps -ef | grep firewalld if it is running, you can remove it by typing in: sudo apt-get remove ...


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firewalld can be controlled through the firewall-cmd tool. To open port 22 temporarily use: sudo firewall-cmd --add-port=22/tcp To add it permanently (so it remains open when you reboot), you will also need to use: sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=22/tcp


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You could, but it would be a bad idea: your notify system will be overwhelmed by the constant sniffing/probing from the Internet and your outgoing connections … If you still want to move ahead, I would: First move the iptables log to it's own file and then open a terminal window and do a: tail --follow /var/log/iptables.log and then you'll understand ...



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