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18

The obvious way to go is to launch such applications in background by adding an & sign to the end of the command, like this: firefox & Please note that Firefox is now a child process of your shell and your terminal window. If you exit them, Firefox gets killed if it's still running. To avoid this and make sure it continues running even after ...


6

You can type firefox & to tell firefox to run in the background, then you can keep using your terminal session... Edit: And @ByteCommander has explained this much more thoroughly than me. But sometimes Firefox (or another process that has been told to run in the background) will print some warnings and so on to the terminal, even if the process is ...


3

This is a hardware problem. Choose the RAM test (memtest86+) from the GRUB boot menu. Run the test to determine if you have a bad stick of RAM. If you have multiple sticks and are having trouble determining which is to blame based on the failing address, test one stick at a time. If the RAM passes check smart status of the drive as shown here If that ...


2

To resolve .bit domains, you can add a new DNS entry on your system to use a provder the maps these domains. OpenNIC is one such provider.


1

In order to make a desktop notification appear put this code into a file whose extension you should put as .html, then run it using Firefox. Double-clicking it should do the trick in most cases. <!DOCTYPE html><html><head><script type='text/javascript'> var RunOnDomReady = function() { function authorizeNotification(){Notification....


1

Usually in Linux world all user's own data and configurations are placed in home directory /home/username/ For example Firefox save its profile data in /home/username/.mozilla/firefox/profilename.default So to backup or sync application data between computers you need to find where it stored in your home directory and just copy application's data ...



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