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11

Probably the most powerful solution you can use is GnuCash. It's not the easiest to learn, but there is quite a bit of documentation available to teach it, and it has a lot of useful features such as double-entry, hierarchical accounts, and the ability to import from Quicken. The GnuCash developers have specifically stated that they will not take on the ...


11

Homebank Homebank is, as the name suggests, a home banking application. It targets home users rather than businesses so seems well suited to your need. As far as encryption is concerned, I don't think this is an inbuilt ability. However, you can keep all of your files in a particular folder and encrypt that separately. An encrypted /home might be useful ...


9

You might want to try gnucash it's a good all around personal finace manager, i even think it can open Quicken files (not sure though!)


9

I am the main developer of Skrooge and I would like to suggest you: Try to change the extension of your file by .OFX and try to import it with Skrooge. Most of the time, it works. Send me by email an example of OFC file (you can find me email in the about page of skrooge), I will add the OFC import in the application. Regards.


6

Firstly i assume that you are talking about OFX and not OFC since Open Financial Connectivity (OFC) is an obsolete file format for financial transaction information. It has since been replaced by OFX. HomeBank (Click to Install) HomeBank is free software. Use it to manage your personal accounts. It is designed to easy to use. Analyse your ...


5

Gnucash is one option. It's available in the repositories.


5

Homebank «HomeBank» is free software. Use it to manage your personal accounts. It is designed to easy to use. Analyse your finances in detail using powerful filtering tools and graphs.


5

Have you thought of taking it to the cloud? I believe Quickens online version has been replaced with Mint. That will free you from platform dependencies altogether. I haven't used it myself as its really targeted at US users and I am not in the US, so I can't say if it does everything your parents would need, but its worth a look. Regarding Linux native ...


4

Grisbi is what I use, and I really find it easy and full-featured. It allows for crypting your files if needed.


4

As said here, homebank is also a pretty good alternative. I have had to find a similar application for my father, and I would suggest Skrooge . We eventually settled on using MS Money anyway, since I managed to get 2005 working in wine (a bit too much work) and he could just open the old files we had to recover directly. However I would highly suggest ...


3

There is also kmymoney


3

I personally have never used SPB Finance, However I use gnucash for basic financial tracking. It pretty much has all the necessary functionality one would need to track money and can import your bank statements as well as generate basic graphs #sudo apt-get install gnucash if you don't like it... #sudo apt-get purge gnucash :) You could also try the ...


2

I use wxBanker https://wiki.ubuntu.com/wxBanker


1

It's worth mentioning that kmymoney is also a good option. It's part of the KDE family, but I've been using it with Gnome for several years. It has a very Quicken-like interface, and it has good tools for managing multiple accounts, setting up budgets, and running reports. I've always found its interface much more attractive and easier to use than ...


1

I've had good luck with Moneydance, which seems to handle most formats and has most of the features you ask for (including OFC import, according to their support site). It's not free, but it's cross-platform and they have an excellent pricing scheme.


1

As the OP pointed in his comment, indicator-stocks does the job. To install it, run the following commands in terminal: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ce3a/indicator-stocks sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install indicator-stocks


1

Alternatively, depending on your desktop environment and requirements, a lot of other solutions are available, as e.g. KMyMoney for KDE and more. Wikipedia has a specific category on Linux accounting software, and there's also a Comparison of accounting software you might want to check.


1

Not sure of all the details, but codeweavers provide a lot of support for wine. Have a look at this link for more details


1

WINE project is financed by users and Codeweavers is the major contributor of Wine. You can read it on their website : http://www.winehq.org/about/


1

There are many companies that support Wine. Here is a link to the FAQ on the Wine website that answers this question. Acknowledgements The Wine Project does a good job on this page stating how they were supported by the various companies listed Even the companies that may not give direct financial support can provide just as valuable support by adding ...


1

Quasar Accounting might meet your needs. The most recent version is commercially licensed (with a free license for a single workstation), but an earlier version is GPL-licensed. I've been running the GPL version with PostGreSQL for a number of years. It is a full accounting package with a chart of accounts, vendors, clients, quotes, invoices, payments, ...



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