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0

Yes it is but it depends on whether you have free space. You can mount a windows NTFS file system to a temporary directory and move all files necessary to the suitable place on your Linux file system directories. If you have no free space it gets a bit trickier.


0

The solution that @UncleZeiv proposed, is not working when there is really no more space left, since sort is using the /tmp folder when there is multiple lines to sort. du -a | sort -nr | head sort: write failed: /tmp/sortuCYq8E: No space left on device An alternative, is a combination of the answer from @UncleZeiv and @Yoav Weiss plus adding another path ...


-1

Terminal: sudo nano /proc/sys/net/ipv4 ip_forward after change it, save with CTRL + O and exit with CTRL + X


0

I had the same problem and solved it myself, here is the way: Go to search and type "disks" open the app named disks a window will open and it will show you your partitions now browse the partition where your soured file lies (file or folder you wish to create the shortcut) select that partition and click settings click "edit mount options" ...


0

The answers have made it obvious that du is the tool to find the total size of a directory. However, there are a couple of factors to consider: Occasionally, du output can be misleading because it reports the space allocated by the filesystem, which may be different from the sum of the sizes of the individual files. Typically the filesystem will allocate ...


0

You should only have read-only access to /home. User files are stored in /home/<user> (replace <user> with your username). It's part of why Unix/Linux is more secure than other operating systems. Open the Home directory, and you will see an icon for the right directory. BTW, when you are logged in, your encrypted home directory has a decrypted ...


1

Most likely your filesystem is slightly corrupted. The usual culprit is an unclean shutdown. When you use a file explorer it tries to access one of the corrupted directories, the kernel discovers the corruption and remounts it read-only. To verify whether this is the case open a command line immediately after the filesystem becomes read-only and type ...


2

I recently had the same problem and I fixed it. I have dual booted my system in Windows 10 and Ubuntu 15.10. So if you too are having dual booted system, this is how to do it : Boot into windows Search for and open Power options in the Start Menu Click Choose what the power buttons do on the left side of the window Click Change settings that are currently ...


5

TL;DR : that's how the developers have implemented the ls.c. Depending on the filetype, the output string for long option -l will be build up differently. GNU documentation fails to mention the format difference(see side note about OpenBSD man page). Device files and ls source code /dev/sda is a block device (explained later in the section). It's different ...


4

I can't find any documentation for why ls shows them instead of a plain 0 like du or stat, but, as Byte Commander says, they are the major and minor device numbers of that special file. From the source: if (f->stat_ok && (S_ISCHR (f->stat.st_mode) || S_ISBLK (f->stat.st_mode))) { char majorbuf[INT_BUFSIZE_BOUND (uintmax_t)]; char ...


3

It seems you missed the concept of 'everything-is-a-file'. In the world of UNIX everything (data, devices, sockets, ..) is mapped to a file. Those files have types - in the case of your home directory you will (mostly) find so called regular files (text, programs,...). In contrast to these regular files the /dev-directory holds - implied by the name - ...


1

You can not use mount with different options for the 2nd time you mount it. So that is a no. This is possible: mount -t ext3 /dev/sda7 /home/first mount -t ext3 /dev/sda7 /home/second This is not ... mount -t ext3 /dev/sda7 /home/first mount -t ext4 /dev/sda7 /home/second The disk you mount does not magically transform from ext3 to ext4 when you tell ...


4

Where rw is read-write, ro is read-only: sudo mount -o remount,ro / See man 8 mount.


2

Boot into Windows and shut it down fully. That message claims it's in hibernation mode, or some equivalent. I've seen this error before multiple times, so I assume that is the solution. Please resume and shutdown Windows fully (no hibernation or fast restarting)


1

And if you don't want to use the -p option, you could type: mkdir ~/test ~/test/panda ~/test/panda/fat


2

Try using the -p argument to create the parent directories as needed. -p, --parents no error if existing, make parent directories as needed


8

Use the -p option of mkdir: mkdir -p ~/test/panda/fat From man mkdir: -p, --parents no error if existing, make parent directories as needed Example: % mkdir /tmp/foo/bar mkdir: cannot create directory ‘/tmp/foo/bar’: No such file or directory % mkdir -p /tmp/foo/bar ## Done Now about a file creation after automatically creating ...


0

The fsck.ext4 shipped with Ubuntu 15.10 is much better than the version shipped with 14.04 and was able to recover the file system. Many files are now in lost+found, but at least nothing seems to be completely lost.


0

You can try to change the partition type in fdisk. To do this, run fdisk /dev/sda with t you can change your partition type in fdisk, which will lead you through the process. Your partition number should be 1 (because of /dev/sda1) and you should choose the partition type 83 (Linux). Then try again to run mkfs.ext4 /dev/sda. EDIT: To have a better check for ...


0

It's been four days, and accepting the comments from the original question, I took the opportunity to do a fresh install of the system. (And that's why it's good for your home directory to be in a different disk...) On the other hand, I think I accidentally (not again...) found the tool(s) that could have been used that time. "Could" was highlighted since ...


0

I'm too frustrated with this and not really receiving a lot of support, sorry for wasting your time im just going to buy a copy of windows tomorrow..


1

Workaround..Workaround..Workarounds! Sorry to start this way, but this what I could come up with after following Debian/Ubuntu for few years. There is a Debian packaging and repository specification in place. Quiet old, they were written years ago. Ubuntu comes to a place where it wants to add more features for software repository. And for known reasons, ...


-1

Unfortunately, it looks like the filesystem on your passport is corrupted. If chkdsk hasn't fixed the issue it would suggest that the filesystem is corrupted beyond repair (at least the repair offered by chkdsk). If you still have the data on your windows machine, the quickest fix would probably be to reformat the drive and re-copy the data.



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