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-2

hope this can help you. Just try to go into your home folder, press Ctrl+H (to see hidden folders) and there they should be. Cheers


7

Via dpkg-query: dpkg-query -L maven dpkg-query -L ant or with a filter using grep dpkg-query -L maven | grep '^/usr/bin' sample output $ dpkg-query -L mc /. /usr /usr/share /usr/share/applications /usr/share/applications/mc.desktop /usr/share/doc /usr/share/doc/mc /usr/share/doc/mc/README.Debian /usr/share/doc/mc/NEWS.Debian.gz ...


0

HOW TO TRANSFER THESE APPS TO PENDRIVE AND INSTALL THEM TO OTHER LINUX OS'S...emphasized text


0

Yes, in theory this is possible, as long as you make sure that neither service is running at the time of the copy/paste, and the new server is the same version as the old one. However, as you are well aware, it is not the recommended way.


1

It's a file for the bamfdaemon. Also called Window matching library - daemon. bamf matches application windows to desktop files This package contains the daemon used by the library and a gio module that facilitates the matching of applications started through GDesktopAppInfo When you open a program, Unity will either pop up a new icon on the ...


0

As alternative, tree command gives you more complex information regarding directories in tree view. Install it with sudo apt-get install tree and try to type tree /


1

Your question is quite vague and the filesystem type is completely up to you, but for most installations, ext4 does the job well, which is the reason Ubuntu will format your drive as ext4 during installation unless you specify otherwise. Take a look here to find out which filesystem is best suited for your need.


1

Ubuntu does have Minimal CDs that are 35MB - 40MB in size that install the base system and allow you to do command line installation. They also let you choose only the packages that you want to install. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Installation/MinimalCD


0

You can run command in terminal: sudo du -hs /* And check which folder takes the most.


0

As you didn't do a 'ls -l ~/Desktop' it is hard to know what exactly is the problem. Would be nice if you could update your post with that. The absolute simplest solution is to let the terminal find out the exact name itself by autocompletion. Genereally you just start to write the command and then hit the tab key. rm F[Tab-key] It should then write out ...


1

Open a terminal and type: rm or sudo rm remember this is for a file not a directory, if it's directory then rm -r, more detailed man rm. Now when you typed rm command just drag&drop that file to a terminal, it will also print/show you a complete and correct path to that file, out of it you can notice if you made any mistakes when providing a path to a ...


0

I was having similar issue with my ubuntu install. Using gksudo solved my issue. One should not use sudo for any Windowing program, gksudo gives a graphical prompt for superuser password which is logically correct way of providing target program with a su session.


1

the name of the file must contain a non-printing character i.e. a character that is not printed even if is there. you should try this: ls -b <your file> | xargs rm you should get the full name of that file by typing the first few letters then pressing tab


4

Upstart is the init system in Ubuntu (till 14.10). It manages services and starts/stops them at appropriate times, and captures their output into logs stored at appropriate locations. Upstart is also able to run services for each user, and the logs of these user-specific services are stored in ~/.cache/upstart by default. Here is it's documentation As to ...


1

Since the answer is a bit old and did not work for me, I share with you my solution. I mistyped an option in fstab for the / directory (very bad, I know). In order to mount in recovery mode with read write option the mentioned solutions did not work for me. I simply chose the kernel with recovery mode option and pressed e to modify the boot parameter from ...


0

Appears to be a problem with how the camera formats the XQD card. If I format the XQD card as exFAT on windows and then copy the exact same files onto it, it works. So it must be how either camera is formatting the card or how the camera is writing to the card.


1

I'd suggest splitting the files into separate subfolders using the command line before proceeding to view your files. Its unlikely that you will be able to productively view and browse the images until you reduce the file count per folder. For example you can split the files by date. If there is a date stamp in the file, you can use a command like cd ...


1

I'm using it on a pretty small SSD. In general it works quite well and I'll keep it, but wouldn't recommend it to an inexperienced user. However, maybe due to the limited space, I have the impression that it slows my system down a bit (compared to ext4). But the main downside is the need for balancing, which must be done regularly if you don't want to end up ...


4

On the BTRFS Wiki you can find companies that are using it in production or testing it in production so out of the development/testing/staging stages. So you can use it for your semester project as long as you don't forget to make back-ups! (But you are making back-ups already, aren't you?)


3

300MB of zero size files is few millions files in a single directory, it is gonna take time to remove Since disc seems ok and nothing is blocking files try using mc (Midnight Commander)to delete KAzdyLisjm and skip directory scanning this way You will at least see progress if any


0

The blocks are used for adding more group descriptors to the table, to describe the new groups added by the resize. Online resize is the only reason for the reserved space, and so the only thing you lose by not having it.


-1

I suspect you're blindly following some instructions on how to mount an Ubuntu ISO image using the loop device. sudo mkdir -p /media/cdrom This creates a directory cdrom owned by root in /media if not existing, and it's meant to be used as the to be mounted filesystem's mount point; cd ~ This changes the current working directory of your terminal ...


1

First make sure you have mounted loop device kernel module. So run: lsmod | grep loop If you get no output, that means you have to mount the loop device kernel module . So: modprobe loop Re-run the following to make sure the module is loaded. You should get some outputs: lsmod | grep loop Now, to mount an ISO file as loop device do the ...


1

It depends on you, i would suggest not to use any place designated to store system wide binary files. Although you can put it in /usr/local/bin or any other designated place to store system wide binary files but as it is not a regular binary file you better put somewhere else. Your home directory may be a good place too. Actually it does not matter where ...


1

There is no definite location that you 'should' store your executable jars in. It is based solely on user preference. I find that keeping my executable jars on the desktop works best so i don't need to continuously travel through my file system to use them which can sometimes get lost if your memory isn't the best. Also little sidenote, if you install Java ...


1

Looks like someone forgot to add a "/" to some parameter: the files start with /tmp so I would assume for now that is the directory "/tmp"). Besides that: files like this in /tmp are normal and are temporary files for instance to track user sessions. December 30th is a long time ago so I doubt you still know what you installed back then. "bleachbit" uses ...


1

The answer is obvious. You HDD has limited read/write speed. When it is busy with copying files, it takes more time to read files from disk. That is why applications start slower and you have slowdowns and drops when watching video. It is normal. If it is really important to watch a video while copying, you can set a higher priority to your media player, ...


0

I've experienced this bug that made my computer runs very slow. At first I thought it's because the new ppa I've just added. But then I discover that it's a bug that has been confirmed in the launchpad: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/vivid/+source/apt/+bug/1445239 It turns out there's a problem in the ServerState::HeaderLine() where it parses ...


0

As far as viewing Ubuntu's root ( / ) directory (same as Windows' C:\ folder) , Pilot6 has already gave you the correct solution: click on the "Computer" icon in file manager's left panel. Alternatively use CtrlL shortcut, which opens address bar, type in / , and hit Enter. File manager will jump right to the root directory. Now , as far as listing all ...


2

Your Ubuntu partitions are mount at start. That's why they are not shown as separate "disks" in file manager. You can see all these system files and directories if you click on "Computer" in your file manager. In most cases you do not need to do anything with system files. All your files are in your home folder.


0

For those that find this later, it turned out that upgrading the kernel to 3.19 fixed everything. I upgraded, rebooted and the disk mounted on boot without errors. BTRFS check came back OK, as did the scrub.



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