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(I am confident this will work and as I am going to travel right now, I will leave this as an answer that I can delete in the future if it does not work.) First, to be safe, run find ~/.local/share/Trash/files/devices/ -exec echo {} \; Second, if the output of "1" did not show any important file, then run find ~/.local/share/Trash/files/devices/ -exec ...


4

Windows' disk check is a filesystem verification tool, and so works on a partition-by-partition basis. Your Lubuntu installation should be fine because chkdsk won't recognize the filesystem type, and so will exit without modifying it.


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Often faster than find, if your locate database is up to date: # locate '' | sed 's|/[^/]*$|/|g' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n | tee filesperdirectory.txt | tail This dumps the entire locate database, strips off everything past the last '/' in the path, then the sort and "uniq -c" get you the number of files/directories per directory. "sort -n" piped to tail ...


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I'm not sure this accurately answers the question. If a file is open for reading (say, by a shared library with its contents loaded in memory), you really don't want those contents over-written unexpectedly. So, I believe the normal way (ie when data=ordered) is to write the data to disk, update the inodes/metadata, point the directory entry to the new ...


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Get hold of a PC running windows, download a program called SD Formatting, install and reformat the SD card, making sure the option is set to "ON", it will then be recognised on a Linux machine! without the read only option.


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There could be some problems with dotfiles (files that start with dots and are normally hidden), but no, there shouldn't be any new file that you need to create for Ubuntu to work normally.


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So today I got a little frustrated with trying to run kill in a loop while dd was running, and came up with this method for running them in parallel, easily: function vdd { sudo dd "$@" & sudo sh -c "while pkill -10 ^dd$; do sleep 5; done" } Now just use vdd anywhere you'd normally use dd (it passes all arguments directly through) and you'll ...


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When you cancel the copying of file there might appear a problem in the filesystem. So reboot into Windows and run chkdsk /F <drive> It should find and fix errors that can't be fixed inside Ubuntu. Offtopic: I dream about such application that would scan disk in Ubuntu without need to boot Windows…


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What you meant by lost? Whether the partition still intact? If so you can use active file recovery. If you formated the partition accidentally then you can try active partition recovery. Sorry, I missed the point. You need it in Ubuntu right, you can install gddrescue and run ddrecue to recover the files. Please check this link for more details on ddrescue. ...


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None of the recommendations here mention that in a manual partitioning set up one MUST include at least 35mb IEF boot partition for the grub and other boot data to go into. I didn't know this and wonder why my 2tb hard drive would not boot up after installation. Luckily when I went to reinstall and selected the option to "Erase and reinstall" on ubuntu ...


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If you did not mark the partitions to be reformatted, then "deleted" them, and overwrote the previous partitions with the same partition format (ext4 etc) then the data that was on the drive is still technically there so when you reinstall, it is theoretically possible to read the data from a previous install Source: I have had this happen also


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There are various levels of corruption resistance in file systems in the event of loss of power, from least to most corruption-resistant. File systems with no journalling. Examples: ext2, fat32, fat16 Such file systems have no protection against file system corruption due to loss of power. After a power loss during a write, the metadata for the file may ...


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The default filesystem, ext4, will be just fine in the event of a power loss, in terms of the filesystem itself, as is any journaling filesystem. If you were thinking about individual files that were not completely saved at the time of the failure, then no filesystem can help those.


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ISO file is special file format called ISO 9660. Here is quote from wikipedia Since ISO 9660 is by design a read-only, pre-mastered file system, all the data has to be written in one go or "session" to the medium. So as a file system is read-only, you cannot mount it with write access. But you can recreate ISO file, if you want. You should mount ...


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Mounting an ISO file (a CD-ROM image) read-write is not possible. By nature, this is a read-only filesystem that has to be written in one go. To alter the content of the ISO file, once mounted like you've done, you can copy the content to another directory, make your changes there and recreate the ISO file from there too. You can use the command mkisofs to ...


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sda2 is just an extended partition. You cannot access it, it just "holds" sda5 and sda6.


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As a workaround, you can simply redirect the output yourself instead of using the -f option: adb logcat > log I am guessing that the program might change it's working directory so it's trying to create log somewhere where you have no write access. If so, you should also be able to get it to work using an absolute path: adb logcat > ...


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You should run this command in a terminal after you boot into Ubuntu and login. This should solve a few of the problems with not being able to boot Win7: sudo update-grub Until you fix you WIn7 boot, you can access your other partitions (apart from linux partitions) by running a few commands in a terminal. Make sure you have installed the following ...


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You can also do gnome-open .. gnome-open is similar to open on Mac which tries to open the file using the best matching application. By default, gnome-open . on Ubuntu will open the current directory in Nautilus. There is an open command in Ubuntu as well but it does not work in this case.


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Basically ICE is a inter process communication protocol, with authentication, protocol negotiation and potentially multiplexing built in. It allows two X clients to talk directly to each other, for example, a video player program could potentially talk to a jukebox program to update each other. As Richard Holloway says, the .ICEAuthority file is for ...


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Fusecompress would have been a ideal, since that lives in virtual filesystem and thus has no requirement on changing the actual filesystem run. However, sadly, the project is dead upstream and I would recommend to stay away from it for this reason. BtrFS supports only ZLIB and LZO compression at the time of writing. ZFS-on-Linux (non-FUSE) offers more ...


2

Your question seems to be the XY problem. Furthermore, the question sound like: How to walk from New York to Washington without passing through London. This because you probably have misunderstood the meaning of a symbolic link: A symbolic link (also symlink or soft link) is a special type of file that contains a reference to another file or ...


2

It would be better if you create symlinks for each file/directory instead. mkdir /home/pt/Dropbox/pt for d in /home/pt/*; do ln -s "$d" '/home/pt/Dropbox/pt/'; done Then delete the link Videos and Dropbox rm /home/pt/Dropbox/pt/Videos rm /home/pt/Dropbox/pt/Dropbox To delete every link, use rm /home/pt/Dropbox/pt/* rmdir /home/pt/Dropbox/pt


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No, you still have a raid1, and the total size is as expected: half of the sum total. You seem to be thinking of a 4 way raid1 ( 4 copies instead of 2 ), which you can't do with btrfs.


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If you're using a journaling filesystem it's possible a bad block or other hiccup was encountered during the writing of the journal. That would force the filesystem to go read-only.


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cp doesn't create directories on its own(it throws and error saying that the destination is not a file or directory), so if at all the files were "copied" to a destination that does not exist, it would mean you have copied to the same folder with a new name. To figure out the new name which, if you don't remember, you can just do the following on a ...


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If you remember any of the files, sudo find / -name "name of file" This might take a while.


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Just start the Ubuntu installation, and in the partition menu, choose "Other" and do exactly what you said : Create an EXT4 partition on the SSD, with a / mountpoint. Create an EXT4 partition on the DATA drive, with a /home mountpoint. You can also use a NTFS/FAT partition if you want, and link this disk to your '/home', with a shortcut directly. PS : ...


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I think that you don't need to actually delete something... just move it away. mv /folder1/folder2/* /folder1/ rmdir /folder1/folder2/ First command moves the contents to parent directory and the second removed the directory if it's empty. This won't move hidden/dot files. If you want also to move hidden files you would need: mv ...


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cd /folder1/folder2/ mv * ../ cd ../ Now check the contents of the folder: ls Then use this command to delete the directory. It is completely safe since it will only delete empty directories: rmdir folder2/


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Right, I tried this (on a VM :-)) and got the same behavior you describe. I changed the permissions on /etc, and rebooted and since I had configured my system to log me in automatically, it attempted to log me in directly and failed. I don't know enough about Unity's internals to be understand the details but my guess is that when you attempted to login, ...



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