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1

Ofcourse the problem was my harddisk. I replaced the harddisk after performing some SMART tests and critical tests failed. Now I listen to music 24/7


1

The first two answers are incredibly bad advice. Formatting or re-writing the partition table, as suggested in the first 2 answers, does NOT delete the data and the data can be recovered in about 20 minutes. This is because deleting and recreating partition table does not delete data at all. You can recover data even after quick format of partition. It is ...


1

you can use find. In your case you can run find -maxdepth 1 -iname 'jre*' Explanation: find searches for files/directories with the given parameters: -maxdepth 1 restricts the search to the current directory. Otherwise, it would search in all subdirectories too. -iname takes the pattern and searches case insensitive. The pattern itself 'jre*' means the ...


0

Find should do the trick: find . -iname 'jre*'


1

Another (python) option, offering a bit of a "fancy" report: ---------------------------------------------------------- Newly copied from /home/jacob/map 1 to /home/jacob/map 2: - Naamloos document - pscript_2.py - test123 - monkey_out.txt ---------------------------------------------------------- Unique files in /home/jacob/map 2: - file_in_targetfolder ...


1

Warning: this is for bidirectional syncing, but given that you are ok in doing things manually... I do not know if there is an option for unidirectional behavior in unison --- if anyone knows please feel free to edit this answer. Install unison: sudo apt-get install unison unison-gtk Create this file in the directory $HOME/.unison, call it test.prf (or ...


1

This should get you going. zenity has many more applications beyond the scope of your question; customize this as you like. #!/bin/bash ls -1 ./FolderA | sort > FolderA.txt ls -1 ./FolderB | sort > FolderB.txt FILESTOCOPY=$(diff FolderA.txt FolderB.txt | grep \< | awk '{print $2;}' | zenity --list --title="Select files to be copied" --co$ echo ...


1

Changelogs are not downloaded anywhere. They are received from the repository online. You can find changelogs HERE. This is for main. Same way you can find changelogs for other sections. man apt-get changelog changelog downloads a package changelog and displays it through sensible-pager. The server name and base directory is defined ...


2

File attributes are stored in inodes. The attributes that each inode stores are listed in POSIX Inode Specification. When we use ls -l or stat or any other program that get us the file attribute uses the stat(2) system call underneath. Now inodes are filesystem dependent property, they are created as fixed numbers when the filesystem is created. There is ...


2

This may not be a complete answer, but this is what I was able to find from my research. File attributes are stored in inodes and the 'inode tables' are generally scattered throughout the file-system. In general, to find where you have the inode tables (at least in ext3 filesystem), you can run: sudo dumpe2fs /dev/<device> | fgrep 'Inode table' and ...


0

I recommend using btrfs with raid6. You do not need anything else. So if for example you have sda,b,c,d,e,f and each have one partition: mkfs.btrfs /dev/sda1 /dev/sdb1 /dev/sdc1 /dev/sdd1 /dev/sde1 /dev/sdf1 mkfs.btrfs -f -d raid6 -m raid6 -L 'writeyourlable' /dev/sd[a,b,c,d,e,f]1 mount -L 'writeyourlable' /whereever/you/want Documentation is a bit sparse ...


5

ls -l /home shows you that there are 2 users - sougata and sougatapc. Each of them will have sub-directories in them such as Downloads, Documents, Pictures etc., which you can list by, ls -l /home/sougata. Your files are stored in these sub-directories, most probably and are not lost. To get a better analysis of your disk, use Disk Usage Analyzer, which ...


2

This might be a completely bogus answer, or it might turn out to be absolutely brilliant. I haven't decided yet. Create 3 101GB (100 + 1 for some extra wiggle room) disk image files, and place the disk image files on the respective drives. Then put those disk images in RAID. You should be able to treat "/media/[drive]/image1.img" just like /dev/sda1 in a ...


0

Here's the quickest way I've figured out to do it. Warning: This may break your phone if typed incorrectly. Ensure you have full backups before beginning and are willing to make mistakes in case you lose all data on your phone. This example command resizes the root filesystem to 6GB, so if it's already bigger than that it will be truncated and your phone ...


7

The meaning of execute permission for a directory is the ability to look up file names inside that directory. Without execute permission on the directory, you can't stat, open, rename, delete, or descend into subdirectories inside that directory. The only thing you can do is see the list of which filenames exist, and then only if you have read permission ...


0

This is because you did not set your drive to mount automatically. You can do it by adding a line to /etc/fstab. When you click your drive in file manager, it gets mounted.


0

The default setup of ecryptfs on Ubuntu mounts the user's directory only after successful login (with the key derived from the user's password). If the user is not currently logged on, even root doesn't have access to the unencrypted version of the files. For encrypted files, check the @.Private@ directories under the @home subvolume.


0

I have two data partitions that I mount at boot with /etc/fstab. However, I dual boot with Fedora. I do not want that to mount on boot (or Xubuntu from Fedora). Therefore, I just use udisks to mount those when I need to ('X' indicates partition number). sudo udisks --mount /dev/sdX You can then set an alias or a keyboard shortcut for the command if ...


4

Partitions will effectively be prevented from mounting by using the noauto option in their /etc/fstab entry. Example: The following line will hide my ntfs partition /dev/sdb2 from appearing in Nautilus, from mounting with sudo mount -a, or on system boot: UUID=87654321FFFFFFFF /mnt ntfs rw,suid,dev,exec,noauto,users,async 0 0 Now if we need to mount ...


0

I do not quite get what you are trying to achieve, but here is a suggestion. You can setup /etc/fstab to mount a partition to a hidden directory with no read permissions. That will do what you want.


-1

I never used "locate", so I removed it. sudo dpkg -P mlocate See Also: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/File_system_search


0

This was solved by formatting as ntfs & running ntfs-config and then re-booting. Rebooting was not mentioned in the post that suggested this, and I just hadn't tried that yet (although I tried reboot between all the previous steps. Sorry I missed this.)


0

Thanks for all of the help and hints of the other answers. I used these and a few other finds to piece together the following conversion solutions in JS: converter = { listing: { '0': '---', '1': '--x', '2': '-w-', '3': '-wx', '4': 'r--', '5': 'r-x', '6': 'rw-', '7': 'rwx' }, modeToRWX(mode) { ...


2

You can get the octals value with: stat -c "%a %n" file However there is a tons of file permissions calculator online: http://file-permissions.ninja http://permissions-calculator.org and a lot more...


1

It sounds like you renamed your file to .ext (where ext is the original file extension). Since files whose names begin with a period ("dotfiles") are hidden by default, the nautilus filemanager is no longer displaying it. You can toggle display of hidden files from the nautilus menu View -> Show hidden files or by hitting Ctrl + h.


0

Open terminal Type lsblk Thats it. Works fine on Kubuntu 14.04 LTS


6

If you mean by "decimal notation" "octal notation": both octal and character notations are communicated between *nix users. In particular notice that in permissions in octal and characters can be split in 3 parts. Like so: rwx | r-x | r-x 7 | 5 | 5 Now look at the position of each letter. In first part, it is true, true, true (or set, set, set). ...


4

The first set of numbers is probably nothing to do with the permission set for the file. If you got this information using ls -l then that number corresponds to the file size in bytes. The octal values are not displayed in this format, but the 'human readable' is. The way that I remember octals is that the first of the four digits is to do with special bits ...


0

You move files either by dragging and dropping in the gui file manager, or with the mv command.



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