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2

Basically when you delete a file ("empty the trash") the index entry to the file is deleted, but the file information is not scrubbed off the disk. As explained here. This is because in Unix file systems, files are indexed by a number, called the inode, and each inode has several attributes associated with it, like permissions, name, etc. When you ...


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Apparently I had saved my img file to right path but wrong device (forgot to mount after restart so it was on my OS device). Thus when I mounted by kvm image device this file was hidden. Found it by accident when I unmounted the device. This response helped to clarify what I was doing wrong.


3

/etc/resolv.conf is auto generated by resolvconf program in Ubuntu. The first line of the file contains: Dynamic resolv.conf(5) file for glibc resolver(3) generated by resolvconf(8) It is actually a symbolic link to /var/run/resolvconf/resolv.conf: lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 29 Feb 9 22:23 /etc/resolv.conf -> ../run/resolvconf/resolv.conf So, in a ...


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You can also run sudo chmod 0777 /home/storage Since FAT drives don't have permissions, linux applies the permission of the mount point to the entire drive.


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This answer is based on an edit by the user to their own question. They should still answer when they can. Run an e2fsck -v /dev/device (replace /dev/device with the actual device path), and it can probably fix the issue.


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The latest ntfs-3g driver can be found here in tarball format and can be compiled and run on Ubuntu using this Q&A. As you didn't mention your Ubuntu version, and there are no PPAs that currently support 2014.2.15AR.3. you have two possibilities: it is the standard package in the 15.04 experimental version, (not recommended for production as this is ...


0

magically, works now: It's mounted? thufir@tleilax:~$ thufir@tleilax:~$ mount /dev/sda5 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro) proc on /proc type proc (rw,nodev,noexec,nosuid) sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nodev,noexec,nosuid) none on /sys/fs/cgroup type tmpfs (rw,uid=0,gid=0,mode=0755,size=1024) none on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw) none on ...


1

Wubi? I'm pretty sure that wasn't supported for 14.04...do you mean the 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows' option? However, Helio is right, you can't really modify a partition size once it's made. So, you need to: Backup everything (Windows and Ubuntu) using the backup tools (search 'Backup' in the Dash and Start Screen/Menu) to some large storage that ...


0

An easy workaround for this is just compressing the files you want to copy, then copy it to your drive and extract the data after you put it on the location you need to. So you don't have to deal with the formatting problem in a hurry. Later on you can still save all files on the drive and reformat your device with a more compatible one, if you wish to.


1

Execute following commands in terminal. id user_name replace user_name with your user name to get your uid then execute this command sudo mount -o rw,uid=your_uid_here /dev/sdb1 /mnt replace your_uid with uid of your user found above.


1

Thanks to no one i found the solution on my own. I was just hopeless and when i was messing around in Windows, i just ran a chkdsk /f on the drive with the issue. It fixed some indexes in few files & when i get to Ubuntu, BAM!! Everything's there. My advice is; in a case like this, Don't try to do any stuff to the NTFS drive from Linux. Let the Windows ...


0

Please, try the following commands: sudo mount /dev/mapper/vg1-lv1 /mnt cd /mnt ls Then if the files are listed on the screen, open Nautilus (a.k.a. File Manager) and navigate to /mnt. You can do this manually browsing folders or pressing Ctrl + L and entering /mnt on the path box.


3

You don't mount the partition containing the LVM, you mount the partitions contained in the LVM. Try mounting /dev/mapper/vg1-lv1 instead of /dev/sdb8. Additionally, since the drive is from a non-x86 NAS, you may need to mount it through fuseext2 due to the non-standard block size (read this question).


1

You need to change permissions or ownership of htdocs directory. To change the permissions use the chmod command, for example: sudo chmod -R 744 /opt/lampp/htdocs To change the owner use the chown command: sudo chown -R username:username /opt/lampp/htdocs To see who is currently logged in, run: who am i Also, you can use find command to change the ...


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If you install own programmes, I recommend 1 folder: /opt


1

The output of df --human combined with the --all is absolutely normal for the system you have, looking at the packages you installed. So you can stop worrying! ;-)


0

Maybe you haven't mounted the partitions. You can try to use "DISKS" in ubuntu to look at your ntfs partitions, then just press the image button PLAY to mount the partition you want to interact with.


0

If you have the space, just tar up your test directory. If you need to revert things, delete the test files, and extract your archive to get back to what you started with. tar preserves ownership and permissions by default.


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Yes, using the stat command (See man stat, man find, man xargs), but why would it be needed? In normal Linux life, wholesale permission changes/restores are rarely needed. sudo find / \(-type f -o -type d \) -print0 | \ xargs -0 stat <stat parameters>


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A package to be uploaded to the Debian repositories should avoid /opt and /usr/local - these directories are reserved for the local system administrator, as per the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard. The lintian tags reflect this. You should, instead, structure your package so that: executables go in /usr/bin (or /usr/sbin, as the case maybe) libraries go in ...


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I had the exact same problem and the solution in my case was to write de exec mount option after the users option. That's because the users option implicitly activate the noexec option, so you have to explicitly specify exec. I got this from "Why can't I run programs on another partition in Linux?" on Unix & Linux Stack Exchange.


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I usually use the following permissions under /var/www/virtualhost: chown -R www-data:www-data * chmod -R 640 * This ensures that only the HTTP server can see the files. No execute permission is needed for .js and .php files. Shell scripts (.sh files) probably need them if you want to run them as CGI scripts (I've never tried it, so I don't know how to ...


1

To rename it (to foobar.dir): mv ./-H foobar.dir to access it: cd ./-H I would suggest you to look at this answer to get more idea on this.


0

One more advantage of shred over dd in this scenario: I have a faulty disk that I need to return to the vendor for an exchange. dd halts at the first bad block, and fails to clobber the rest (unless I painfully use skip=... to jump ahead each time it stops). shred ignores write errors and happily continues in this case.


0

My bad...I was trying to copy a whole directory, not a file. I found out this is accomplished by using cp -a directoryname/. newpath/newexistingdirectoryname/ (and that using "/." is the same as using DOS's "." (wildcard). Sorry about that. And thanks for your help. I'm new to StackExchange. Do I just remove this whole post, or mark it as answered or ...


0

~ is an abbreviation for the current user's (here: root's) home directory. For normal users, this is /home/MYUSERNAME/ and for root it's just /root/. I would suggest you to try your cp command with the absolute path to the file (/root/MYFILETOCOPY) instead of the account-depending abbreviation (not: ~/MYFILETOCOPY). Does that work?


0

In my version, 14.04.2, I have a slightly different menu in the Disks option to hide partitions. 1 Open Disks 2 Left click the drive with partitions you want to hide (it turns orange) 3 Left click the partition you want to hide (it turns orange) 4 Click the double-cog in the bar below the partitions 5 Click "Edit Mount Options" 6 Turn Automatic Mount ...


3

Please read What are "/run/lock" and "/run/shm" used for? and see why what you are asking is not possible and not going to help you create space on / and that you are incorrectly interpreting this data: /run/*/ is a tmpfs; not actual space. Then none in the file system column indicates this is not an actual hard disk. You need to analyse ...


1

You can rsync the files to another, but it won't boot (as you've observed). However, it's not difficult to set the new drive to boot after you've copied the files. The exact method depends on which boot loader you want (grub, gummi, etc.), how you've configured your partitions (do you have a separate /boot partition?), if you're using partition tables or ...



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