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Before you try anything else, copy the entire device to a safe place: sudo dd if=/dev/mmcblk0 of=/var/tmp/safeplace bs=1024k If dd gives you errors, something may be wrong with your device, or the card reader in your machine. Have you tried reading it on some other machine (I assume the answer is "yes", so read on!) Next, use try reading the partition ...


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Press CtrlL, enter the address to the desired directory, and press CtrlD.


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Virusboy has the right idea, and after digging around, I can confirm that /usr/share/app-install is related to software manager. This thread mentions that the folder is related to app-install-data package. Doing a simple check apt-cache search app-install-data reveals the following: $ apt-cache search app-install-data ...


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The files encountered are nothing more than symbolic links to meta file data of installed programs. As Serg explained the apps using the software center go into described folder. They are not real programs but merely point were the system can cache for faster use next time. It more effective and efficient to have a system gather all programs and make meta ...


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Can't add a comment because of lack of reputation, but want to tell to those of you who have GPT disk when testing it with fdisk, use gdsik instead to get start sector and count proper offset. It helped me. fdisk -l gave me: Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System vm2080737.bak1 * 1 3901 31457279+ ee GPT ...


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I think it still ext4, even I can't find any official link of the supported file system or what is the default file system used. But as workaround you can still use some commands like mount df -h -T blkid which shows you the filesystem used in your system. So give it a try and check your card FS


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If you want filesystem information and not partition/volume information, I think you'll have to use filesystem-specific tools. In the case of the extN systems, that would be dumpe2fs. And dumpe2fs doesn't directly print the size in bytes, as far as I can tell. It does, however, print the block count and the size of blocks, so you can parse the output ...


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It looks like you create shortcuts to ntfs partitions, which are not permanently mounted. You probably click on a Windows partition in file manager, and it is mounted. When you boot next time, you get this error message. To avoid it you can edit /etc/fstab to mount Windows partitions at start automatically. This will help to underatand it This is another ...


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ls doesn't show the size of a directory's contents. It shows the size used to store the metadata describing the directory. That size will depend on the number of files in the directory and the length of their (and the directory's) names, and not on their sizes. To illustrate, I will create different numbers of empty (0-size) files: ## 10 files for i in ...


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In large-scale environments, like labs, or corporate systems, to facilitate administration and allow users to work on multiple PCs, home directories are made available over the network, typically via NFS. In such cases, user accounts are also served over the network, using LDAP or something similar. A lot of things can be served over NFS - for example, if ...


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You can allocate the free space (with GParted) by Right-Clicking it > New. Set its new space to 536.4 GB, label it and create the new partition. Apply the action by clicking that green V under the Device tab. Then you will be able to create an extended partition.


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Probably, your Kernel doesn't contain the nls_utf8.ko module. If it's your case, you will see similar entries in your dmesg output: [ 612.598233] CIFS VFS: CIFS mount error: iocharset utf8 not found [ 612.598547] CIFS VFS: cifs_mount failed w/return code = -79 To confirm it, you can run uname -a to get your current Kernel and search for the ...


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your files are still there since you don't format the partition that contains that your home files. But they don't appear since the partition is not mounted so what you need to do is to mount the old partition. mkdir /media/old_partition sudo mount -t btrfs /dev/sdXX /media/old_partition Replace XX with number of hdd and partition number that contains ...


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I solved the problem! First i noticed in /etc/fstab that / was mounted with subvol-@ but /home as subvol=@home. So I googled and found the solution. Here are the steps (assuming /home is on /dev/sda2) I did: Create a directory to mount the total partition. sudo mkdir /mnt/old_home Mount the partition. mount -t btrfs /dev/sda2 /mnt/btrfs Copy contents ...


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This thing goes deeper. I believe the best practice is to keep internal drives mounted at /mnt, and external removables at /media. This post illustrates a difference in functioning, where /media blocked access to certain system and user processes, (because of the default limiting umask attached to any drive that is mounted) where as /mnt acted like the host ...


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Using inoticoming: You can put a script in /etc/init.d/ that runs inoticoming at boot time. Create a new folder to hold the inoticoming log / last pid for the watched folder: sudo mkdir -p /var/log/inoticoming/watched/ Create a script inoticoming_watched in /etc/init.d/: * Remember to change <path_to_folder> and <path_to_script> to match the ...


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It seems I have solved my own problem, albeit through a discredited answer on Ubuntu forums. In fact, the solution is almost laughably easy: holding down the ESC key. No, really, it does work. All you need to do, provided you have an installation disk, is to hold down the ESC key before the GRUB Rescue prompt appears. Then you can directly select your ...


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Owner User and Group of my /var folder is root/root (permission 755). This is my output of: ls -d /var/ drwxr-xr-x 13 root root 4096 Apr 16 2014 /var/


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So I realize that an answer has already been accepted, but here's the solution when it happened to me (just incase anyone else sees this thread). TLDR; make sure there aren't any conflicting folder names in your hadoop directory (for me it was /usr/local/hadoop). When I was generating output, I was putting it in a folder called output/, however prior to ...


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I did this using a system with multiboot distros (Ubuntu on ext4, Xubuntu on btrfs). Running Ubuntu, I have taken the Xubuntu btrfs home partition, and archived it using fsarchiver. I was then able to restore it, again using fsarchiver, to a different partition and specify ext4 filesystem type. That seemed to work okay. Still in Ubuntu, I mounted the ...



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