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Your question needs to be answered with NO. For it to become an issue: someone first needs to gain access to your machine. If there is no way for someone to gain access exploiting it will be impossible. You do not mention having a web server active. You do not mention this machine being connected to the internet. So the answer is no. Still ... WHY would ...


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In this case in the logs, no news is good news. If there were errors that could mean the disk or filesystem was going bad. I saw a bug report about a "cleaner" program that would write thousands of files, that caused Nautilus to never "load" the folder either, but if there's not many files (looking in terminal) that's not it... Maybe a weird corrupted ...


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Assuming that your Linux file system is on (hd0,1) If you want to list files in the partition try grub> ls (hd0,1)/ (It will only with the filesystem containing Linux) grub> set root=(hd0,1) Also check the name for your vmlinuz and initrd file. grub> linux /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda1 (sda1 will change according to your Linux filesystem) ...


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This finds the size recursively and puts it next to each folder name, along with total size at the bottom, all in the human format du -hsc *


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To check the filesystem itself, you fsck it. This requires it to be unmounted, so you either need to boot from the live cd, or you can run sudo touch /forcefsck and reboot and it will be checked at boot time. To check the integrity of installed applications/files, you can install the debsums package and run it and it will verify the md5sums of all files ...


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In Linux, all files starting with a dot are hidden files. If you want to show hidden files in a terminal, use ll instead of ls If you want to show hidden files in your file manager press "View" and then "Hidden files" (Or press Ctrl+H) Alternatively, you can create a shortcut to the "Repetierhost" directory by right-clicking it, clicking "make link" and ...


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Files an folders that has names starting with "." are hidden. They are normally not displayed. To see them there is a command in menu.


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The best one I think is the following: du -h directory_name | tail -n1 This will show you only the size of the directory that you are interested in and will not print sizes of any directories and files inside that directory. I should add that if the size of the folder is large then du takes longer time. You must be patient for this command to work. Just ...


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Try taking a look at this: http://www.ubuntugeek.com/creating-custom-ubuntu-live-cd-with-remastersys.html. Be careful, though I have never done this and I advise you to proceed with caution.


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After a couple of tries, I finally found the problem. When I run bleachbit as root, it automatically creates files with similar names. I don't know which kind of options cause this, I'm still investigating. EDIT: take a look at this Strange folder in my home folder after a failed run of BleachBit and this ...


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I did figure out what the problem was in the end and I posted some updates on the Windows 8 forums in this thread here: http://www.eightforums.com/general-support/39343-windows-8-automatic-repair-loop-issue.html This was the solution that I gave in that thread: Ok, so I've marked the problem as 'solved', because I've figured out what was going on. ...


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If your question is really "Will deleting this file damage my system?" No, deleting the file won't damage your system. But we don't know anything about the services and data ON your system. Do just a little more investigation first: When was it saved? (in Italian, for example, 'lug 22' its almost 5 months ago) Do you remember what big changes you wrought ...


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Nothing is wrong. I have the same. /dev/sdb2 219G 19G 190G 9% / none 4,0K 0 4,0K 0% /sys/fs/cgroup udev 7,8G 8,0K 7,8G 1% /dev tmpfs 1,6G 1,4M 1,6G 1% /run none 5,0M 0 5,0M 0% /run/lock none 7,9G 65M 7,8G 1% /run/shm none 100M 60K 100M 1% /run/user ...


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"none" means it is a temporarily mounted filesystem storage (created by the kernel). The storage does not happen on your hard disk drive but happens in memory (or in the swap space).


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See man run-parts It says, in part: NAME run-parts - run scripts or programs in a directory SYNOPSIS run-parts [--test] [--verbose] [--report] [--lsbsysinit] [--regex=RE] [--umask=umask] [--arg=argument] [--exit-on-error] [--help] [--version] [--list] [--reverse] [--] DIRECTORY run-parts -V DESCRIPTION run-parts ...


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First, in linux, everything is a file. Binaries and libs are all files. Second, boot.img and core.img are not in your MBR. The MBR is the first part of your hard drive and contains the initial boot and partition table. The MBR then passes off the boot process to grub, which is located on your boot partition. See ...


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It's to do with order of inclusion (list order). The config snippets will be iterated over one at a time to produce the full set of configuration options for the application. By adding the numbers at the beginning of each filename it allows shell scripts (and other types of programs) to easily grab the directory listing and then process the scripts in the ...


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It turns out an xfs_repair is all I needed, it just took a long time since the drives are so large, wipefs doesn't delete the secondary superblocks so xfs is able to recover itself


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I don't know about FS recovery exactly like this, and I don't know if XFS has backup superblocks or something that could help. Maybe wipefs didn't erase much, it says When used without options -a or -o, it lists all visible filesystems and the offsets of their signatures. Does running wifefs -n (the -n , --no-act to make sure nothing else gets erased ...


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Your problem is likely a combination of hardware issues and damaged directory structures from not ejecting the disk properly. If Disk Utility is unable to repair any filesystem damage, replacing the disk is the best option. Quit using the disk until you have a replacement. Recover the data you can to the new drive. You may be able to get some additional life ...


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Following the suggestion of douggro I was able to get things done properly, even without an entry in fstab: sudo mount -t cifs //ip-adr-of-seagate/user /mnt/centraldrive -o username=user,pass=password,uid=1000,gid=1000,iocharset=utf8,sec=ntlm,file_mode=0777,dir_mode=0777


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You must setup root password: sudo passwd Then restart the ssh service: sudo service ssh reload Note: permitting root access especially without password is quite dangerous it makes your system highly vulnerable to external threats.


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you need to get permission to read/write in /var/www folder: sudo adduser <username> www-data sudo chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www sudo chmod -R g+rw /var/www here replace <username> with your username.


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To answer the quesion ... I just want to know that is there any way to copy a file from one Ext4 partition to other without using terminal? You can use Nautilus if you copy the file over with the user name that owns the destination you want to copy the file to. That user needs to own that location or needs to be part of a group owning that location. ...


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This can happen because there is a disk drive error. What you describe has happened several times to me. Your fstab will have an entry similar to this: UUID=80e377f3-6e78-4126-aa93-35ee62b58272 / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1 This is an instruction to remount the drive read-only if there are errors. In my case this was caused by faulty sata connections to ...


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Both are true, because these are two different projects. You should have noticed that: The latest xFS release was in 1997. The Wikipedia article on XFS doesn't link there, but to other sites. Such an article usually links to the project site, which seems to be xfs.org. Please read more carefully.


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It sounds like your usb drive may have bad blocks, so many bad blocks that the kernel is forcing a read-only mount. The check if this is true, check the kernel message buffer with sudo dmesg and look for signs such as Volume was not properly unmounted. Some data may be corrupt. Please run fsck or Input/Output error and most importantly, Filesystem has been ...


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It appears you may be confusing XFS (a journaling file system) with xFS which appears to be something entirely different. Case matters.......



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