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5

SMS are stored in ~/.local/share/history-service/history.sqlite which you can edit with the sqlite3 tool. I would avoid manipulating this database directly though, as it is not documented whether manipulating this file directly will cause it to lose sync with state that might be stored elsewhere.


1

If you have a disk image on a BTRFS volume, you might need to turn off the Copy on Write feature, at least for your VM disk image. CoW copies altered data to a new space (with its alterations) before modifying the file header data. On a VM this means shoving a HUGE file around for even the most basic change. You can disable CoW on a file (the disk image) ...


1

I would suggest a slightly different approach. Create a separate partition in Windows (e.g. drive D:) and store all of your data files (e.g. documents, pictures, etc.) in that partition. Mount the data partition in Ubuntu but do not mount the main Windows partition. Now, all your data files will be accessible to both operating systems, but Ubuntu won't be ...


1

I've taken a somewhat different and perhaps incompatible approach to yours. Rather than save the btrfs send stream with -f, I always btrfs receive to reproduce the snapshot on the backup media (also a btrfs filesystem). Additionally, all snapshots are indistinguishable from each other - there is no difference between monthlies, daylies, hourlies etc. - they ...


0

From man 2 open: O_NOATIME (since Linux 2.6.8) Do not update the file last access time (st_atime in the inode) when the file is read(2). This flag is intended for use by indexing or backup programs, where its use can significantly reduce the amount of disk activity. This flag may not be effec‐ tive on all ...


2

sudo chown www-data:www-data * -R The above command has changed ownership of all directories, sub-directories and files of your home directory from default to www-data user and www-data group sudo usermod -a -G www-data $username This command has added a new user www-data and new group www-data. You can revert changes back to normal by this command ...


1

Short answer: usermod The usermod command modifies the system account files to reflect the changes that are specified on the command line. as outlined in man usermod chown changes ownership as outlined in man chown Long answer: chown -R operates recursively so sudo chown -R www-data:www-data * changes ownership of every file from the current directory ...


4

You can "remove" from yourself the temptation of modifying Windows files by hiding them via .hidden files. Just place a file with name .hidden in the directory where the files you want to protect are located and put a file or directory name in each line. These files will be hidden from file managers (except dolphin I think) and the terminal (unless you put ...


1

I also encountered this, and found that reinstalling gedit fixes the issue: sudo apt-get purge gedit sudo apt-get install gedit


1

When you open the folder properties, the displayed number will not contain hidden files. In Unix/Linux dotfiles refers to files/directories with a dot (.) prepended to their name (i.e. .bashrc). The leading dot is used as an indicator to not list these files normally but only when they are specifically requested like pressing Ctrl+H in Nautilus or typing ls ...


2

I believe that per-subvolume compression is not available yet. From the BTRFS wiki: Most mount options apply to the whole filesystem, and only the options for the first subvolume to be mounted will take effect. This is due to lack of implementation and may change in the future. This means that (for example) you can't set per-subvolume nodatacow, ...


2

You can set the setgid sticky bit on the directory to ensure that all new files in the directory will have their group set to the group of the directory. To do that, run chmod g+s DIRECTORY, where DIRECTORY is the name of your directory.


13

/dev/null is a special kind of file called "device file". Device files act as a interface to some kernel functions. They just occupy the space that is needed for a directory entry ("inode") but don't have any real content and don't have an actual file size. Other device files are e.g. /dev/sda (generally a HDD or SSD), /dev/zero (a file that generates ...


35

/dev/null is not really a file. It's a character device! $ ls -l /dev/null crw-rw-rw- 1 root root 1, 3 Apr 10 09:53 /dev/null The first letter c of the permissions string (crw-rw-rw-) indicates this. For files, it would be a - instead. So in easy words: /dev/null is not a file but a virtual device mapped to this path in the file system which has the only ...


0

To create a new Documents folder Open home folder Right click and create new folder, name it Documents Change icon by right click on the Documents folder and select properties. Click on the folder icon, this will bring up a select custom icon window. Browse to File System > usr > share > icons > Humanity > places > 48 & select the 1st ...


0

Screenshot is not loaded... Yet, I assume you need to have both Windows and Linux OS's. Your hard drive can have 4 partitions: 2 will go for Windows and 1-2 for Linux (your choice). So, just make empty space, for example 50GB, before /dev/sda3 by formatting and deleting partitions /dev/sda1-2. Run Windows installation and choose that empty space (Windows ...


0

Edit file /etc/sysctl.conf and edit this section: #net.ipv4.ip_forward = 0 to net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1 (remove # sign) then type command: sysctl -p Last, reboot your system.


0

Not really a security threat; ubuntu comes with ntfs-3g by default so it can read/mount ntfs partitions from the get go. Granted, one could use your linux partition to nuke the windows partition, but that's on you, not the os. Secure both OSs and the issue is nonexistant :)


1

You could disable delayed allocation under ext4 (nodelalloc), that would make it significantly more likely that you would recover more data if/when you did suffer a power out during a write, but it would come at the cost of more fragmentation of the file system over time.


0

Ext4 is the default and most widely used on Ubuntu. As a fairly new user, it's the one I've used most often. There's a good overview of file system types, on the ubuntu help pages here. Have fun!


1

I am guessing you are using a version of BleachBit older than version 1.2, right? If so, there are maybe a million empty files in this folder. You are deleting this folder correctly, you just need to wait much longer because deleting files is slow on Linux. You can watch the progress using the command df -i, which shows inodes usage. BleachBit 1.2, ...


1

Please be aware that if the system has selinux and selinux is in enforcing mode, and selinux's policies are set up properly; then nothing much will happen. Selinux is mandatory access control, which means, among many thing, that the root user really has not much more power to destroy the system than any other user on the system. Selinux is enforced in the ...


41

I haven't tried this command on Ubuntu (for obvious reasons) so I am not sure if Ubuntu will allow its execution. I did. rm -rf / --no-preserve-root was running in a root session opened directly on the machine, while I was also connected through ssh from another machine, using the root account as well. What happens is that you start to get a lot of ...


2

You can add as many slashes as you want after each other at any position. It doesn't change anything. You also can add ./ as often as you want because "." is the link from every directory to itself. This and other acrobatics even work when you're saving files. I often will save files with names like "/tmp/a.png". The last time was about 4 minutes ago. Try ...


23

The reason is that the file naming layer (what you see with ls) is really just for your convenience. The file system driver and kernel care only what the inode is. When a file is referenced by name, it is immediately translated into the inode which contains all of the metadata including the permissions, the data blocks on the disk, the owner ID, the group ...


14

Previous answers are good, but I want to clarify one detail: rm isn't just a command. It is a program that is found in PATH. Therefore what happens when you execute is following: you call (as root) rm -rf / instance of program rm is loaded in memory with arguments -rf and / based on these arguments program rm starts its operations (going through ...


0

Once everything is wiped from the harddrives the kernel is still working but sort of stuck as there are no devices and programs, commands, etc. left. The OS won't work anymore. And it's true what Oli says, the command gets loaded/executed into memory and nothing will stop it unless you kill this process (of course, if the kill command is still present ^^). ...


60

It doesn't matter that /bin/rm is deleted. It's only being run once and by that point it's all loaded in memory, as is everything else required to keep sending deletes to the filesystem and disk. Sidebar/Update: Per David Hoelzer's answer (and mentioned in the comments), the inode the hardlink /bin/rm used to point to would remain right up until rm ...


3

I suggest mkdir --mode=755 /opt. Read/Write/Search for Owner (root:root), Read/Search for Group and Other. Allows root to create files/directories, allows anybody else to search and descend the directory tree under /opt (depending on lower nodes permissions)


3

Directory /opt is optional. It is not being used for anything in the standard Ubuntu distro so somebody decided not to create one. Not a big deal. Just create it with sudo mkdir /opt Edit As suggested by waltinator a better command would be mkdir --mode=755 /opt


0

It is good advice to shutdown, and boot into a live media as soon as possible. if you simply used rm -rf on a directory, then the file data is likely still intact, just the pointer to that location has been removed, or marked with a delete flag. The resource doesn't actually get over wrote until the OS needs to write files to disk, which things with a ...


0

You CAN'T unmount the root partition, while it's in use, that's impossible. The only way to give it a try is to boot the LIVE-CD and try to fix it from there. It would be best, if you don't use the system any longer, because the blocks are set to "unused" by the system. The longer you use this system, the bigger the chances are, that you override your data ...


0

An even more general approach than those already presented - I have the following in my ~/.bashrc: open() { for file in "$@" do xdg-open "$file" > /dev/null 2>&1 if [ "$?" != 0 ]; then echo "$file"": Failed to open" else echo "$file"": Opened successfully" fi done } xdg-open is a useful program that opens ...


8

As well as nautilus . you can also do: xdg-open . and it will do the same as if you double clicked a file in nautilus. Which also means you can open a spreadsheet in LibreOffice with xdg-open mysheet.ods etc. I have it aliased to xopen for slightly quicker typing by putting the following in my .bashrc alias xopen=xdg-open


5

Install the nemo file manager: it has a terminal-and-file-manager-in-one. My nemo is customised with home-brewn steam punk icons, but you get the point... ;-) Commands to install: sudo sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/nemo sudo apt-get install nemo Optional packages: (bold ones are the ones I've got installed as well) nemo-dbg - File manager ...


7

Once inside your terminal, simply type nautilus . to open a new nautilus window. There is also a file explorer for the terminal itself. Type: sudo apt-get install mc Then when in a directory, type mc to open it. Screenshot of Midnight Commander(MC) File Manager: I use MC all the time in tty. It's mainly keyboard shortcuts and although you can click ...


24

From your terminal, just open nautilus as follow: nautilus . It will open a new instance of Nautilus in the directory where you were in your Terminal. From the nautilus man page: SYNOPSIS nautilus [options] URIs...


0

Files created by the edIt app are stored under: ~/.local/share/com.ubuntu.developer.pawstr.edit/ This is actually a known limitation of the app:


15

Basically when you delete a file ("empty the trash") the index entry to the file is deleted, but the file information is not scrubbed off the disk. As explained in this Ubuntu wiki page: This is because in Unix file systems, files are indexed by a number, called the inode, and each inode has several attributes associated with it, like permissions, ...


0

Apparently I had saved my img file to right path but wrong device (forgot to mount after restart so it was on my OS device). Thus when I mounted by kvm image device this file was hidden. Found it by accident when I unmounted the device. This response helped to clarify what I was doing wrong.


3

/etc/resolv.conf is auto generated by resolvconf program in Ubuntu. The first line of the file contains: Dynamic resolv.conf(5) file for glibc resolver(3) generated by resolvconf(8) It is actually a symbolic link to /var/run/resolvconf/resolv.conf: lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 29 Feb 9 22:23 /etc/resolv.conf -> ../run/resolvconf/resolv.conf So, in a ...


0

You can also run sudo chmod 0777 /home/storage Since FAT drives don't have permissions, linux applies the permission of the mount point to the entire drive.


0

This answer is based on an edit by the user to their own question. They should still answer when they can. Run an e2fsck -v /dev/device (replace /dev/device with the actual device path), and it can probably fix the issue.


0

The latest ntfs-3g driver can be found here in tarball format and can be compiled and run on Ubuntu using this Q&A. As you didn't mention your Ubuntu version, and there are no PPAs that currently support 2014.2.15AR.3. you have two possibilities: it is the standard package in the 15.04 experimental version, (not recommended for production as this is ...


0

magically, works now: It's mounted? thufir@tleilax:~$ thufir@tleilax:~$ mount /dev/sda5 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro) proc on /proc type proc (rw,nodev,noexec,nosuid) sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nodev,noexec,nosuid) none on /sys/fs/cgroup type tmpfs (rw,uid=0,gid=0,mode=0755,size=1024) none on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw) none on ...


1

Wubi? I'm pretty sure that wasn't supported for 14.04...do you mean the 'Install Ubuntu alongside Windows' option? However, Helio is right, you can't really modify a partition size once it's made. So, you need to: Backup everything (Windows and Ubuntu) using the backup tools (search 'Backup' in the Dash and Start Screen/Menu) to some large storage that ...



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