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This is just a setting in Nautilus. The default setting are designed to improve network performance. However, you can change Nautilus to display preview thumbnails of remote image files... Open Nautilus From the menubar, select Edit Select Preferences In the File Preferences dialog, Click on the Preview tab From the Files drop down, make sure "Always" is ...


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Today, the filesystem looks very different than a week ago, when I had the warnings. Here is today: mark@Lexington:~$ df Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/sda1 20026236 12591856 6394048 67% / none 4 0 4 0% /sys/fs/cgroup udev 1980460 4 ...


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My method for clean system log files is this. Steps 1 and 2 are optional, but sometimes you need check older logs and backup is sometimes useful. ;-) Optional: Copy log file cp file.log file.log.old Optional: Use Gzip on copy of log gzip file.log.old Use /dev/null for clean file cat /dev/null > file.log And we use for this logs (only on several ...


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Its quite normal that u have 100% on your / : Your / is on a partition of 20G and your /home is on a partition of 367G Imagine that your "/" is the c: partition and your "/home" is your d: partition in windows, on your "/" you will have your system files and configs .... type this : sudo apt-get clean all cd / sudo du -csm * --exclude=home |sort -n ...


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I will try to answer as many of your questions as I can: Is this a reasonable setup or is there anything I'm getting wrong (size/system)? What is reasonable for one user may not be for another. This is because we all use our computers for different purposes, and in different ways. As others have pointed out: You probably wont need 16GB Swap. 2GB should ...


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When it comes to creating a startup disk from scratch (you want to add all files manually) I'd recommend Ext4, as it basically eliminates all the defrag stuff you need with FAT, it is simple and recognized by most everything UNIX, and has great error recovery support. If you are burning an ISO to create a LiveUSB then it would come with its own (FAT? comment ...


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First of all, check what files may have been deleted with dpkg -S /opt or grep ^/opt /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.list. It should give you a list of packages that might need to be reinstalled. If none is, then just recreate the directory with a simple sudo mkdir /opt. You may also check if you have installed packages manually in those directories, but that's very ...


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On a newly installed Ubuntu system, /opt exists but is empty. You can just run: sudo mkdir /opt And that will recreate it, with the correct permissions. But if there was software installed inside when it was removed, that won't bring it back. There probably wasn't, though. You'd likely have remembered installing it there. /opt is not usually for ...


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The disk is likely corrupt, and causing alot of these issue - you may be able to resolve this by checking your disk for errors - this is possible using Windows [1] or Linux [2] [3] However it may work if you escape the \s (place \ before each \ - also remember to "quote" the filenames as they have spaces in) e.g. rm "3D Face Reconstruction from Single 2D ...


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You can use find along with exec for this propose. Your install.sh should be #!/bin/bash find ./apps -type d -exec echo Entering into {} and installing packages \; replace text after -exec with your command for example #!/bin/bash find ./apps -type d -exec touch {}/test.txt \; It will loop through app and all its sub-directories and will create ...


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Use full path of your parent directory(in my case apps directory located in my home directory) and remove one extra command(cd ..) for f in ~/apps/*; do [ -d $f ] && cd "$f" && echo Entering into $f and installing packages done; See screenshot: with cd .. command and using apps/* See screenshot: without cd .. command and using ...


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The handling of configuration files is described in the XDG Base Directory Specification. It defines a set of related path environment variables like XDG_CONFIG_HOME and XDG_CONFIG_DIRS, which define, for example, where the .config directory is by default, and how to handle it in various other controlled ways . Very common is obviously the form ...


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Your GPT partition table is broken according to the output of gdisk. Please backup your partition table to a file on a working drive with: sudo sgdisk --backup=/path/to/backup.sgdisk /dev/sda You need to store it somewhere where you have write permissions like a USB drive or your home folder. If you're on a live system, you should also store the backup ...


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Try this procedure. Create shared folder and give right permission: mkdir /pathYouWant/share chmod 770 /pathYouWant/share This gives no access to other. chmod +t /pathYouWant/share This mode, according to chmod manual page: The restricted deletion flag or sticky bit is a single bit, whose interpretation depends on the file type. ...


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Advisory note: It would be a very good idea to backup the entire file system before performing any changes or fixes to it. If you don't have enough space for that use e2image(8) as an emergency precaution. Fixing corrupt superblocks [Edit] According to your comment you have a corrupt file system superblock. There's an answer on serverfault that deals with ...


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Unfortunately, your problem is not solvable so easily. If a user has write permission in a directory, he can also delete files. Even if he wasn't able to delete them, he could still fill a file with zeros, which would be a deletion of data, but not of the filesystem node. An idea which I once used: You create a cronjob, which recusively removes the write ...


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As a quick fix delete /var/log/syslog and restart the syslog daemon (sudo initctl restart rsyslog) or your entire system. Beyond that something went wrong with your logrotate(8) task that's supposed to prevent overly large log files, but that is a bit more difficult to fix.


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On Oracle Linux it happens when you have (a lot of/large) files which are deleted but still open by a running process. Then stop of the processes or reboot of the machine helps.


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It may help to switch to the CFQ scheduler, because it is more optimised towards rotational media: echo -n cfq | sudo tee /sys/block/[hs]d?/queue/scheduler > /dev/null You can benchmark file system performance with IOzone (package name iozone3). More on the CFQ scheduler http://www.makelinux.net/books/lkd2/ch13lev1sec5 Graphical representation ...


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Unless you quite literally have a directory named .. in /etc, no, that directory is not in /etc. .. refers to the parent directory of the current directory, (like . refers to itself) and exist for every directory: $ ls -al / total 16 drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 0 Jun 1 2013 . drwxr-xr-x 1 root root 122 Jul 14 05:33 .. So /etc/../ actually refers to /, and ...


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The brute force 'old school' way for ext3 is the "Tripwire" method (I named it from the insidious Tripwire product): build a list of files, then do it again, run diff. The more often you build your list and diff it, more close in time you will know when directories were both created AND deleted. The two ways to build such a list is use: ls or to use lsof. ...


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I added a little more detail for the ' Run a script with user interaction on log out / shutdown?' ideas on how to make it work through lightdm and posted those ideas here: Run a script with user interaction on log out / shutdown? Basically, you can prompt the user (or just go ahead and do AutoFsck without prompting) on lightdm shutdown. The bottom line is ...


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Does MTP Help? There doesn't seem to be a very good (functioning) way of mounting a Nexus 4 in Ubuntu, […] I was wondering if you knew about the MTP protocol? It seems to be the main way for accessing media data of Android devices without SD cards via USB. Modern Ubuntu versions (>= 13.04) should ship MTP support for Nautilus already. For older Ubuntu ...



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