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I have found WinSCP to be the best tool for a Windows desktop or server interacting with a Linux environment. You need to install ssh on the Linux environment first for WinSCP to work.


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p7m is an encryption format that is often used for email attachments. I was also not able to find a Linux tool that is able to open that file type after a quick google research. However, there exist some tools for Windows (e.g. Cryptigo p7mViewer) or OSX. What you could try if you have no access to a computer running Windows/OSX is to install the Windows ...


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Ctrl+S, then any regular expression. Sources: 1, 2


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I've followed this tutorial. This is about a persistence partition, e.g. a partition with an EXT filesystem labled casper-rw. So what are you actually using, a file or a partition? If you are using a file, how are you trying to increase the file size? To my knowledge these files are created by allocating a file in the filesystem with zeros, mounting it ...


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You can not increase the size of a persistence file beyond 4GB on a FAT32 file system, (I've never seen a persistent install work on a NTFS file system). In order to use a persistent partition you may need to delete the persistent casper-rw file, the pendrivelinux tutorial assumes you created the pendrive using "extra space" and a casper-rw file was ...


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No. The problem you have is that if an admin would not be able to remove a file it would introduce a security risk: someone with malicious intent and access to the system would then be able to install a file on your system even the admin of that system could not remove. A disgruntled admin could have some real fun with that... Besides attr (that can be ...


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6*2TB RAID5 will give you between 8TB data and 4 TB parity and 10GB data and 2GB parity The former gives you dual disk failure protection whereas the latter is discouraged as it gives you single disk failure protection without any further redundancy. Also, depending on the UI, you will see the real usage (including parity) or the fake usage (excluding ...


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First of all check if the system can see your disk with the lsblk command. if it does you need to gather the volume name from the command in your case its sdb. And the partition you want is sdb2. Then if the system does not see it, it means that you have to mount it. Create a mounting point: sudo mkdir /media/sdb2 Mount the drive: sudo mount /dev/sdb2 ...


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That may be because you have not assigned the filesystem type (ext4). Maybe this question can also help you => "No root file system defined" error while installing ubuntu


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If the BIOS does not allow you to boot from USB or DVD use the following methods: A. Upgrade your BIOS (refer to your manufacturer's web site for more information) OR B. Hardware solution: remove the hard drive from the laptop, put it in an external enclosure Boot from DVD and install on the (now external) HDD move the external HDD back into your ...


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You can use the following script, #!/bin/bash awk -v var="$1" '{print var" "$0 }' "$1" > /tmp/temp.txt mv /tmp/temp.txt "$1" Give the script execution permission, as chmod +x scriptname Run the script as, ./scriptname test assuming "test" is the file that you are going to modify and you are running the script from the same folder where the file ...


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A binary search can easily handle millions of records so searching the single directory would not be a problem. It will do so very fast. Basically if you are using a 32 bit system, binary search upto 2Gb records is easy and good. Berekely DB, an open source software, would readily allow you to store the full result under one entry and would have the search ...


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You can try with mediainfo: mediainfo f00000.avi To rename all .avi files in the current directory, run: for f in *.avi;do title=$(mediainfo $f|grep -i "movie name"|cut -d":" -f2);mv -v "$f" "$title";done Install mediainfo using the command: sudo apt-get install mediainfo


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Use find command: find . -type f -name "*.docx" -execdir unzip {} "word/media/*" \;


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A simple loop will do the trick. unzip supports specifying a target directory, so you can do for f in *.docx do mkdir -p "$f"-images unzip "$f" "word/media/*" -d "$f"-images done


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As mentioned, your code is not really clear to me. One of the mistakes you make is that you put the linenum_words = 0 inside the loop, which means that on every subfolder, you would start counting from 0. If you want to use python, what would work anyway is to use os.walk, which would count the words in all files in a directory and its subdirectories, no ...


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Do you need Python? You can count words using the command line tool wc: wc -w * wc (short for word count) is a handy tool to count words, characters or lines in text files. Open a terminal, navigate to the folder containing the files you want to count words and run the command above. The first parameter -w means to count words (as opposed to lines or ...


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Try using the command without the backslashes (\), as these may be causing issues on the command line of your shell. The backslashes are used to denote command continuation onto another line, but if you are copying and pasting, then extra tabs and spaces can get picked up. Try using the following one line example: ffmpeg -i oceans.mov -an -c:v libx264 -r 24 ...


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This folder contains your settings and preferences for that particular application. You can delete it if you really want, but the application will start with default settings. If you are seeing these folders and don't want to, you have probably selected Show Hidden Folders. Try pressing CTRL +H to toggle this.


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Those folders definitely were created before, but you probably hit Ctrl+H accidentally (the key combination to toggle visibility of folders and files with a name starting with a dot), so you can see them now. What these folders are for Usually applications store all kinds of (user specific-) settings & configuration files, profiles etc. in these ...


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Would there be any problem with me saving the potential circa 10 million results in separate files in one directory? Yes. There probably are more reasons but these I can post off the top of my head: tune2fs has an option called dir_index that tends to be turned on by default (on Ubuntu it is) that lets you store roughly 100k files in a directory ...


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In a single (flat) directory If all files are in one and the same directory, the script below should do the job. #!/usr/bin/env python3 import os import sys dr = sys.argv[1]; ids = ("_3800.mp4", "_8000.mp4") checklist = [f[:-9] for f in os.listdir(dr) if f[-9:] in (ids)] for f in [f for f in set(checklist) if checklist.count(f) != 1]: ...


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This may occur due of the different cluster size: On a disk that uses 512-byte sectors, a 512-byte cluster contains one sector, whereas a 4-kibibyte (KiB) cluster contains eight sectors. A cluster is the smallest logical amount of disk space that can be allocated to hold a file. Storing small files on a filesystem with large clusters will ...


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echo "Hello" > test.txt This will OVERWRITE "hello" in to the test file. If the file did not exist it will create it echo "Hello2" >> test.txt This will add a NEW line in the file with hello2


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a useful use of cat: provide input on stdin cat > filename enter text hit Ctrl-D to stop or use a heredoc cat > filename << END enter text provide the terminating word to stop END


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Use cat > some_file to write into the file some_file. End your input with Ctrl+D


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Go to a terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T and type md bin Go to the dash type gedit and press Enter Copy paste the following text into it: #!/bin/bash # # This script deletes video files of 8000 bps if and only if the 3800 bps file exists # as set in http://askubuntu.com/questions/581400/how-to-delete-files-selected-by-rules # # ...



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