New answers tagged

2

You're probably doing nothing "wrong", but wiping data is much harder than in the floppy disk days. Unless your filesystem is non-journalling AND you never defragment the filesystem, the only guarantee to make sure data is completely gone to software is to destroy the entire filesystem, or on an SSD, security wipe the whole disk. See this answer (the "...


6

Downloading, unzipping and running Xonotic can be accomplished as follows: cd wget http://dl.xonotic.org/xonotic-0.8.1.zip unzip xonotic-0.8.1.zip cd ~/Xonotic ./xonotic-linux-glx.sh If this does not run particularly well (ran fine here) you can use: cd ~/Xonotic ./xonotic-linux-sdl.sh A few other choices in there including a Makefile that installs to /...


0

Create a small shell script like this one: #!/bin/bash openssl pkcs7 -inform DER -in "$1" -print_certs -out "$1.pem" openssl smime -verify -in "$1" -inform der -noverify -signer "$1.pem" -out "$1.pdf" 2>/dev/null rm "$1.pem" evince "$1.pdf" rm "$1.pdf Make it executable Select "open with other application" Choose the small script created above Done.


2

First, this command will find and delete all files older than 7 days in any subdirectory in /home whose name starts with securityuser: find '/home/securityuser*' -mtime +6 -type f -delete You need -mtime +6 and not +7 because -mtime counts 24h periods. As explained in the -atime section of man find (-mtime works in the same way): -atime n ...


0

find ./dirc/* -mtime +x -type f -delete ./dirc/* : is your directory (Path) -mtime +x : older than x days -type f : only files -delete : no surprise. Remove it to test before like rm Auto delete files older than 7 days


1

as per i my knowledge: try find command like this: find ./dirc/* -mtime +6 -type f -delete ./dirc/* : is your directory (Path) -mtime +6 : modified more than 6 days ago (therefore, at least 7 days ago) -type f : only files -delete : no surprise. Remove it to test before like rm


0

workaround in this post worked for me I went to /usr/share/applications and took a backup of nautilus.desktop and org.gnome.Nautilus.desktop Then: In nautilus.desktop, removed "NotShowIn=Unity;" In org.gnome.Nautilus.desktop, added "NotShowIn=Unity;" and removed "OnlyShowIn=Unity;"


0

This is the output of a filesystem check at boot for the /dev/sda1 partition. fsck (actually probably e2fsck if it's an ext4 filesystem, which is the default for modern Ubuntu installations) is the program which carries out the checks. This is set to happen after a configurable number of reboots, or after a certain time period. It can also be triggered if ...


0

I actually just use scp on the terminal for this. If you select a bunch of files / directories in nautilus and copy them, you can paste them into a text editor- they'll end up as paths separated by newlines. I just append \ to the end of each line, replace %20 with \ and add quotes if necessary (note the space after the slash), prefix with scp or cp and ...


2

Have you tried XnViewMP? It's known to work on some dds files, but some read errors have been reported too. You can't find it in official repositories, but here: http://www.xnview.com/en/xnviewmp/#downloads. Don't worry, it's free, paid version is for Windows only.


10

The command line application ImageMagick can read, write and edit DDS files: andrew@ilium~$ identify -list format | grep 'Microsoft DirectDraw Surface' DDS* rw+ Microsoft DirectDraw Surface DXT1* rw+ Microsoft DirectDraw Surface DXT5* rw+ Microsoft DirectDraw Surface andrew@ilium~$ The codes after DDS,DXT1 and DXT5 signify: * ...


0

What is happening is that nautilus itself is always running in the background. If you start a new nautilus instance, it will just "attach" to the previously running instance of nautilus, then close itself. That is why it is disappearing from the launcher. Try opening nautilus with Alt + F2 like you said, right click it, then hit "Lock to Launcher". This ...


0

Modify ~/.config/libreoffice/4/user/registrymodifications.xcu. Add <item oor:path="/org.openoffice.Office.Common/Misc"><prop oor:name="UseLocking" oor:op="fuse"><value>false</value></prop></item> after the other <item oor:path="/org.openoffice.Office.Common/Misc">


1

Unfortunately unlike the x86 world the arm world doesn't have a common "platform". PCs all boot in the same way, they have crucial system hardware like timers in the same place. They all have the registers used to enumerate the PCI bus(es) in the same place. They have a BIOS that passes further details of the hardware to the OS. Arm boards don't, each SoC ...


1

Firefox will create a temp folder following the pattern /tmp/mozilla_${USERNAME}${INDEX} where ${USERNAME} of course represents your user name and ${INDEX} an index starting at 0 to avoid conflicts between multiple running instances. So for me this directory could e.g. be called /tmp/mozilla_bytecommander0 Inside this directory, it will save the files ...


2

Your command should be : grep 'unix$' your_file | sort Of course you shoud replace your_file with the file you want to sort.


3

You can just use the find command. find /path/to/where/to/search -type f -perm -666 Enter path where you want to do the search. The -type f meand that only files will be searched. Finally -perm 666 means that only files with read/write permissions for all users will be matched. Please note that if file has also executable permission for any user it will ...


0

You can use Catfish to search for files and it can be started from within the Whisker menu. In the Whisker menu properties "Search Actions" tab, create a new search entry with the following parameters: Name = Catfish Pattern = ~ Command = catfish --start %s *Note: you can use whatever pattern is most useful to you. Once this is done, simply enter in ...


0

This is a fairly simple use of bash scripting. SUM=0; for line in `cat file.txt`; do SUM=$((SUM + line)); done


2

par and par2 files were more common in the days when Usenet was a little more popular and the parchive was intended to increase the reliability of transferring files via newsgroups. Under Xenial Xerus you can use these files with pypar2: sudo apt-get install pypar2 This give a basic gui from which to manipulate the files: Further Reading: Par2 Files ...


1

Use numsum from the package num-utils! (You may need to sudo apt-get install num-utils) The command numsum does just what you need by default; $ numsum file.txt 19 Reading the test numbers line by line from stdin: $ printf ' 1 3 4 1 4 3 1 2' | numsum 19 Or reading from one line: $ printf '1 3 4 1 4 3 1 2' | numsum -r 19 More utilities The ...


1

You can use awk, a native linux application usefull to scanning and processing files with a pattern per line. For your question, this will produce what you want: awk 'BEGIN { sum=0 } { sum+=$1 } END {print sum }' file.txt Pipes are also accept: cat file.txt | awk 'BEGIN { sum=0 } { sum+=$1 } END {print sum }'


8

You could use awk, too. To count the total number of lines in *.txt files that contain the word "hello": grep -ch 'hello' *.txt | awk '{n += $1}; END{print n}' To simply sum the numbers in a file: awk '{n += $1}; END{print n}' file.txt


14

bc with a little help from paste to get the lines in a single one with + as the separator: paste -sd+ file.txt | bc To use the output of grep (or any other command) instead a static file, pass the grep's STDOUT to the STDIN of paste: grep .... | paste -sd+ | bc Example: % cat file.txt 1 3 4 1 4 3 1 2 % paste -sd+ file.txt | bc 19 % grep ....


0

Two tools will help you here - fuser and lsof: fuser - identify processes using files or sockets lsof - list open files Read man fuser and man lsof, then choose a tool.


0

Here's a transcript showing a bit more about the nature of the problem, and how to fix it as of Ubuntu 16.04. Notice that even though file reports "dynamically linked", ldd reports "not a dynamic executable". $ ./myprogram bash: myprogram: No such file or directory $ file myprogram myprogram: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), ...


0

Above solution by kmario23 is correct I see some typo errors. Here is another example. pramodimac:SDK pramod$ pwd /Users/pramod/Downloads/SDK pramodimac:SDK pramod$ ls -ltrh total 150104 -rw-r--r--@ 1 pramod staff 1.3M Jun 3 11:56 SDK.zip -rw-r--r--@ 1 pramod staff 18M Jun 3 11:58 SDK.z03 -rw-r--r--@ 1 pramod staff ...


1

You can also go the other way and set the share on our Linux machine, you can follow these instructions on how to do that. help.ubuntu.com - How to create a network share Procedures All commands must be done as root (precede each command with 'sudo' or use 'sudo su'). Install Samba sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install samba Set a password ...


1

Share the files from your windows computer by right clicking on the folder that contains them, and picking "Sharing". Give it some basic level of access. Press Windows Key+R and type cmd, then click ok. type ipconfig and get the IP address of your wireless adapter. From your Ubuntu machine, open a new file window and click (from the menu bar) GO --> Enter ...


0


6

You can use the stat command stat -c '%s' filename See man stat for details and other options Or, with du du -b filename


0

No, you cannot change the owner a file without access, but if you own the file, you can change the permissions of the file with chmod and may change the group with chgrp to another group you a member of. Related Question: chown is allowed to non root user?


1

There are several tools focusing on recovering deleted files. I do know: Testdisk PhotoRec The following is copied from the arch wiki - which list more tools TestDisk and Photorec are both open-source data recovery utilities licensed under the terms of the GNU Public License (GPL). TestDisk is primarily designed to help recover lost partitions and/or ...


2

In the simple case you show above, where each line has two "words", the target directory and the new name, and where neither can contain any whitespace, you can simply do: while read -r from to; do mv "$from" "$to"; done < file That will read each line in file assign the first string (until the first whitespace) to $from and the rest of the line to $...


2

There is one entry per line in the a.txt file, so the names listed do not contain \n (new line) char, right? A line contains 2 names separated with a space char, so the names do not contain space char, right? (or another possibility would be to use fixed length for the names listed). Give a try to this, if the names do not contain neither \n nor space ...


4

Assuming the names in the list do not include spaces, other than between the names, the script below will rename folders from a textfile recursively. It will read the lines of the file, split them into two (new name, old name), rename occuring folders which are named by the second string in the line, into the first string in the line. It will do this, as ...


6

You could use xargs with mv: xargs -r -a /path/to/file.txt -L1 mv (assuming you're in the directory where the files are located). xargs converts input to arguments for a command. -a foo to read input from foo. -L1 to use exactly one line of input per command invocation. -r to avoid running the command if the line is empty For example, using echo mv ...


2

Running an executable file that exists in the same directory you are in, requires the use of ./ in the beginning of the filename. In this case, the correct sytax to use in the terminal is: ./convert-py3k + Enter There should be NO spaces between ./ and the filename.


0

Go to the folder you want and press Ctrl+Dand voilà! the bookmarks shows!


1

In Ubuntu GNOME 16.04 with GNOME 3.20 there is now such an application called Search and Indexing (or tracker-preferences) installed by default (if it is not installed or if you are running a previous version which does not have it pre-installed then it can be installed by running sudo apt-get install tracker-preferences) which one can use to highly flexibly ...


1

From debian-8 : [Unit] Description=Network Manager Wait Online Documentation=man:nm-online(1) Requisite=NetworkManager.service After=NetworkManager.service Before=network-online.target [Service] Type=oneshot ExecStart=/usr/bin/nm-online -s -q --timeout=30 RemainAfterExit=yes [Install] WantedBy=network-online.target


4

The script below will allow you to right-click a file and choose the option timestamp from the scripts menu. right click -> Scripts -> timestamp the file is timed How to use Copy the script below into an empty file, safe it as timestamp (no extension) ìn ~/.local/share/nautilus/scripts. Create the directory if it doesn't exist yet. Make the script ...


1

Here is a guide to creating plugins for sublime http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/how-to-create-a-sublime-text-2-plugin--net-22685 You can define a keybinding and attach it to command to generate your filename with a date in it. You might not be able to trigger the save but you can at least prefil the clipboard with the name and then paste it into the save ...



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