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15

Emacs' default mode is to create a backup file with a "~" suffix every time you edit and save a file. You can disable this by creating a .emacs file in your home directory and setting an option inside it. This happens with Emacs on all platforms. Other editors may do the same under Ubuntu, but it has nothing to do with Ubuntu itself.


6

It's emacs(and xemacsand jed) -- not Ubuntu -- that creates those files. It's a copy of the previous version of the file your editing, ie. the file as it was before you made changes and used "save" to save them. I admit it's often a bother, but it's certainly useful if you've make changes you later regret. It can be turned off manually -- and you can turn ...


6

It's a backup file that contains the file's content from before saving and will be created every time you save the file.


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Using iwatch iwatch o_O is a realtime filesystem monitoring program using inotify and a working local mail service For a better obscurity you should change the mail address and start the deamon as root, or something else … :) sudo apt-get install iwatch Create a configuration file with the name iwatch.xml <?xml version="1.0" ?> <!DOCTYPE ...


6

Using bash brace expansion : cat SomeFile{1..100}.dcd >final_file You can have a check at first to see which files it is being expanded to by : echo SomeFile{1..100}.dcd Here {1..100} will be expanded to 1,2,3....100. Example : $ echo SomeFile{1..5}.dcd SomeFile1.dcd SomeFile2.dcd SomeFile3.dcd SomeFile4.dcd SomeFile5.dcd


5

Press Ctrl+X or F2 to Exit. You will then be asked if you want to save. Press Ctrl+O or F3 and Ctrl+X or F2 for Save and Exit The notation for short-cuts is as follows: Control-key sequences are notated with a caret (^) symbol and can be entered either by using the Control (Ctrl) key or pressing the Escape (Esc) key twice. Escape-key sequences are ...


4

^ is a common abbreviation for Ctrl. The editor you're using is nano, and you can find more documentation about it here: http://www.nano-editor.org/dist/v2.2/nano.html#Editor-Basics. That said, if you have another editor you prefer (e.g. the graphical Gedit editor, or vim), just indicate that using the EDITOR environment variable: EDITOR=gedit sudoedit ...


3

The user with the ID 1004 doesn't exists (anymore) in your system. You can check this with grep ':1004' /etc/passwd If there is no output, the user with the ID 1004 doesn't exist. You can take the ownership with this command sudo chown $USER:$USER file


3

using find and sort find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -name "*.dcd" | sort -V


3

Using find The following solution works not with deleted files and, if you have not set noatime in your fstab, eg: defaults,noatime Using find after you have your account back. find ~ -atime -1 means, accessed less than 1 day. Or a combination: find ~ -atime 1 -atime -2 means 1-2 days ago from man find -atime n File was last ...


3

From man touch: -d, --date=STRING parse STRING and use it instead of current time -t STAMP use [[CC]YY]MMDDhhmm[.ss] instead of current time DATE STRING The --date=STRING is a mostly free format human readable date string such as "Sun, 29 Feb 2004 16:21:42 -0800" or "2004-02-29 16:21:42" or even "next Thursday". A date string ...


3

That's a job for join: join -t, -j1 -o 2.2,1.2,1.3 <(sort file1) <(sort file2) -t specifies the input and ouput separator -j1 is the join field (in both files the first one) -o ... the format of the output as desired in the question


3

This is something awk handles very well by reading one file in memory and then replacing the items in the other one: $ awk -F, -v OFS="," 'FNR==NR {a[$1]=$2; next} {$1=a[$1]}1' f2 f1 new order,tested test,12345 new quote,test explore,34567 The idea is to store the values from file2 in an array values[file1]=file2. Then, when reading the file1 we replace ...


2

perl can also use the expansion syntax in loops: perl -e 'print "SomeFile$_.dcd " for 1..100' > foo.txt


2

This question does not concern Ubuntu but rather blender, however I still have an answer for you. Blender has its own text editor which you can open by selecting text editor from the current editor button. After you are in the text editor simply select the browse text button (icon that looks like a notepad) and select system-info.txt.


2

Using AirDroid for Android and your Browser. All your files, travel freely between devices, without a cable. Start AirDroid on your smartphone and open the shown URL in your browser in your virtual machine.


1

I know it is a couple months late but for dpkg I was able to get everything running again by finding the appropriate dpkg file for me that was the file from here: https://launchpad.net/ubuntu/trusty/+package/dpkg I chose the appropriate .deb file for me (my computer runs on amd64) I clicked to download it, then clicked save file (The software-center won't ...


1

Over the network. Maybe it is possible to add a network Adapter in VirtualBox and then download a FileExplorer-App in Android. In Ubuntu you only have to make a Folder which is accessible over the network. After that go to the explorer app and add a network share. Now you should be able to transfer files from Android to you host system.


1

First, create the file, using the editor of your choice. Store it in a user directory, something in or under $HOME Check it to be sure it says what you think it says, and does what you want. Then, and only then: sudo cp yourfile /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/50-mouse-acceleration.conf


1

try diff -u file_1.txt file_2.txt > patch1o2 then patch -p0 < patch1o2 the first command will create a file called patch1o2 containing all the difference between the two files The second command will add in the first file the content of the difference at the same line position. output will be a file_1.txt updated with extra lines from file_2.txt ...


1

You can't use sudo with cd. To get into protected directories, you can type sudo bash To get a root login shell or type su - To log in as root in your current shell. The behavior of both is identical, the back end differences won't matter much for what you're doing.


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Don't reinvent the wheel - badly. Use auditing. Tracking who accesses what files is exactly what auditing is for. A good link to get started is here. Auditing goals By using a powerful audit framework, the system can track many event types to monitor and audit the system. Examples include: Audit file access and modification See ...


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You can try PlayOnLinux for that. Usually that works well, but not always. Give PlayOnLinux a shot. To install it run this in Terminal: sudo apt-get install playonlinux And there's no way to 'convert' .exe to .deb


1

Via find and grep I don't use grep -r because in POSIX systems, you don't find -r parameter for grep. find . -type f -print0 | xargs -0 grep 'your_email_address' {} \; Or find . -type f -exec grep -l -- 'your_email_address' + There are many possibilities. The command finds all files in the current folder and subfolders and passes the result to grep. ...


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You can try using grep -r: Here is an example where I grepped for the text "listen_address" in any file from my home dir: aploetz@dockingBay94:~$ grep -r listen_address * Documents/stackOverFlowAnswer_connectToCassandra.txt~:If you are connecting to Cassandra from your localhost only (a sandbox machine), then you can set the `listen_address` in your ...


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Should I install skype to my /home/me/ directory (or a subdirectory of that) You shouldn't install Skype manually. Just download and install the ".deb" package. Should it be installed in system apps location (where is that? /bin? /usr/bin?) The apps are stored normally in /usr/bin or /usr/lib ...



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