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5

What you're trying to do used to be called hacking a long time ago. Now it's a bad word, but back then it was good! (Trying to take things apart.) The three most important tools in a computer_programmer_hacker's toolbox are: His brain A Hex Editor like ghex a disassembler (ask another question once you're up to this level) Go to a terminal (If you ...


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If you were in your home folder, then you deleted your entire Desktop folder... Re-creating it with these should work: cd ~ mkdir Desktop And try not to use rm -rf without being absolutely sure what will be deleted next time. Especially with sudo.


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There is no default location. I would not use any of the regular directories for this. Keep the server clean from outside backups and put those is a clear defined location. Most likely I would use a removable disk and mount it. Something like /external_backups/ or /media/external_backups/ and inside that subdirectories with the server name and inside ...


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If there is a sudden increase in speed, followed by a gradual decreasing and another sudden increase, it is because there is a buffer somewhere in between the source and the target. The source fills the buffer, which is instantaneous (high speed), but then the source has to wait while the target is busy emptying the buffer as fast as it can. From the point ...


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I don't think a file manager will have anything to do with speed. It more your read/write speed on the drive. your processor, memory and cache are factoring in there somewhere too. If were talking USB drive, then we have to factor in USB bandwidth and if anything shares the same bus (like a raspberry pi. USB and network use same bus, so if your ...


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Regarding Nautilus: To stop wasting time on unwanted preview and file counting actions go to preferences and the preview tab and adjust your settings to match this: Regarding alternatives: I've found PCManFM to be very lightweight and fast (even on underpowered systems). PCManFM is the default for the LXDE desktop which is popular for systems that ...


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In order to delete a file in Ubuntu, we can use the standard command rm in Ubuntu Terminal. However, there are some precaution, for example about the ownership of the file/ folder. For more detail instruction, please look at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/DeletingFiles Good Luck.


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I found that on my system (Debian Jessie) there's also a ~/.config/mimeapps.list that had an association I accidentally created to open a specific file type with gedit. None of the standard ways of correcting this (default application settings, Thunar's open with property) reflected this, but gedit was the default application. I was able to remove the line ...


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I tried the dconf-editor (see first answer on this page) on 32-bit Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and it worked without a hitch. The steps include: In terminal: sudo apt-get install dconf-tools In dash, find and launch dconf Editor In dconf Editor left pane, expand org -> gnome -> gedit -> preferences In dconf Editor left pane, select ui In dconf Editor right pane, ...


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Welcome to Ubuntu and GNU/Linux! As things stand, Windows won't be able to do anything with your Ubuntu Server files on a number of levels: 1) It won't be able to log into the system. (You would need to use ssh for this) See: SSH on help.ubuntu.com. This won't help you with file transfers directly, but it will help to manage your server from Windows. 2) ...


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TFTP predates Windows, so it does not use Windows naming conventions. No C:\ drive for you! ;-) Depending on the TFTP server you installed (Microsoft's?) and the version (which?) and what the configuration is of your server (config file? Registry keys?) you are "sharing" some subdirectory somewhere on one of your hard disks. The tftp commands (type ...


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The default installation of Ubuntu uses the ext4 filesystem, which Windows can't read without installing third party drivers (see also the other answer of The Thunder Chimp). Personally I think you are much better off making a second liveUSB with Xubuntu to recover your files and then do the reinstall.


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To expand on whatever you missed in the original answer... they ARE exactly the same size. The sizes are being displayed using different metrics. The units they are counting are different. In the post you linked in a comment the person answering even mentions how you can get the "du" command in linux to display using the same metric as windows is using ...


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Excuse me if my question is stupid, but did you connect your HDDs to motherboard via SATA cables, not USB, right? The next question is why you have 'sync' in /etc/fstab? I dont have one in mine. Please try without this.


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binwalk can be used to find patterns in files. This is in particular helpful for firmware and filesystem images, but can also be helpful if your file format stores compressed sections with a clear marker.



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