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5

Yes. It's safe to view any system file(s), especially if you don't use sudo or root. prakhar@aS4v4g3wOrld:~$ ll /sbin/init -rwxr-xr-x 1 root root 265848 Jul 18 15:16 /sbin/init* The owner of /sbin/init is root. The only way you can modify this file is either via logging as root ($ sudo -s) or by giving an editor superuser permissions using sudo. Besides, ...


4

Yes, every Linux distribution, including Ubuntu, has a directory /tmp Every user has write access right in this directory, hence can create files inside it. Those files are not kept forever - content of the /tmp directory is deleted after each system reboot.


4

The Recently Used information is stored in a file called recently-used.xbel located under the .local/share directory per user, the full path being: ~/.local/share/recently-used.xbel It contains metadata on the recent files, like what is the application that opened it, or the application that should display it in its history. For example, my gedit shows ...


4

Not sure what your end goal is. If its security your after you need to look in to Unix file permissions or maybe even file encryption. Hiding a file provides no measure of security.


3

You can't simply add a new location to Places like you add to Bookmarks. This because those locations are hardcoded into Nautilus. You can change the name or location of the directories or you can hide the directories by pointing them to Home by editing ~/.config/user-dirs.dirs file, but you can't add new locations. So, to add a new location to Places you ...


3

Use the directory /tmp it is emptied at next reboot


2

You do not tell whether you're writing compiled code or using Bash? Tested Bash scripting: template=/tmp/$(basename $0)_$(date --rfc-3339=date)__$$__XXXXXXXX template="$(echo -n "$template" | tr ' ' '_')" file=$(mktemp -u $template) echo $file Example output: /tmp/bash_2014-07-25__4772__nrzQXfMg Repeat from file= (the last two lines) for new ...


2

Well you could make the containing directory owned by somebody else (eg root) and disable others' read permissions on it: $ sudo mkdir --mode 700 lockbox $ ls lockbox/ ls: cannot open directory lockbox/: Permission denied But you'll have to be root to enter it. With that in mind, you would do as well to just use /root. Anybody with sudo access can view ...


2

Well, what you are trying to do sounds a lot like steganography, which is a rather advanced version of the technique of labelling a tape of secret files with something inconspicuous such as "Gov promo 1989". In other words, the trick is to masquerade the information as noise in a different file, which won't easily get noticed unless you know it's hidden in ...


2

In the world of Linux, any file or directory that's name starts with a . is considered hidden. Note that hiding a file or directory is not a measure of security, it's just for convenience, so that unnecessary files such as configuration files don't bother your daily routine. They can be listed easily if you wanted, e.g. ls -lA. As for hiding partitions, ...


2

So you want to search the dash for either baobab or Disk Usage Analyser. This is already installed. You can either chose doughnut or box graph, click the buttons in the bottom right to switch. Doughnut: Grid: Hover over to view the size... (3GB here) ... and click on a folder to see what makes that up:


2

Sure, you can read it without doing any harm. It's a binary file - if you are interested in the text in it, like program symbols, messages, or version numbers, use strings: strings /sbin/init | less /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 I*|YB GU1q nx#$ BDCE #9ym libnih.so.1 _ITM_deregisterTMCloneTable __gmon_start__ _Jv_RegisterClasses _ITM_registerTMCloneTable ...


2

Of course, if you create a hard link to a file, then both the original file and the hard link point to the same inode. In fact, both are equivalent - for the system there is no such thing as "the original" and "the link". They are simply two access points to the same inode. Consequently, they take up no more space together than if you had only one access ...


1

In order, '.' is the current directory, and '..' is the parent of the current directory. typing cd .. will move you up the directory tree one level.


1

. refers to the current location, and .. refers to the parent directory. The 8 is 8K. Try using ls -alh.


1

Assuming you have a folder that contains only project folders, you could run the following in that folder: for proj in *; do phpfiles=$(find $proj -iname '*.php') size=$(du -ch $phpfiles | tail -n 1 | cut -d\t -f1) echo $proj $size done Explanation: we iterate over all project folders. In each folder, we find all *.php files. We compute the total ...


1

You can use dd as follow to create quickly a file zero filled. dd if=/dev/zero of=sparse.img count=1 bs=1 seek=$((10 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 - 1)) It's very fast because one byte is really writen in physical disk. But this function does not supported in some file systems. If you create a file random filled, as follow. dd if=/dev/urandom of=random.img ...


1

You can also use the command line if you would rather. ls -h -l /path/to/folder or ls -sh -S /path/to/folder to show you it ordered by size. You can choose which folder in your file system to view, and view it in many different ways using this tool. /home is often a big one. There is more info available in the manual: man ls That command will show ...


1

Edit: This is apparently not going to solve this problem, according to @ ElefantPhace. I am not familiar with that app (or the language), so I answered blindly. /EndEdit You can find out what the default file manager is by issuing the following command at a bash command prompt: xdg-mime query default inode/directory If nautilus is the default, it ...


1

Try to use the Disk Usage Analyser app (installed in Ubuntu by default).


1

No, there is no such thing as Completely Hidden files. The point of hidden files are to hide from the user all the "ugly" system files. If there was no way of seeing it, there would be no point, surely?


1

Ubuntu 14.04 should work with FAT32 and NTFS from the get-go. However, FAT32 has a max file limit of 4GB (any files larger than this can't be put on it). If you install exfat-fuse on Ubuntu by typing sudo apt-get install exfat-fuse into the command line, Ubuntu should also mount the exFAT filesystem, which is similar to FAT32 except it does not impose the ...


1

You could consider doing either of the following: Using tmpfile() will create a file that will remain open until your program ends. Using shm_open() may be better if your goal is to be able to do inter-process communication. If the there is a security concern necessitating the removal of the file - this link will be interesting for you.


1

GEDIT: Search and replace \n with a space ' '. You can get the replace window by going to 'Search'->'Replace' or via the keybpard shortcut Ctrl+H See screenshot below: Your original text is on lines 1-14. The result is on line 16.


1

There is this script sec.Bluetooth.SendFile.NautilusScript.sh You have to copy it to ~/.gnome2/nautilus-scripts/ And may need to install its latest dependencies too.



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