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90

It is possible to do a on-line resize of a ext4 filesystem, even if it's your root partition. Use the resize2fs command. sudo resize2fs /dev/sda1 EDIT: On-line shrinking is not allowed: root@brunojcm-htpc:/home# resize2fs /dev/sda5 2654693 resize2fs 1.42 (29-Nov-2011) Filesystem at /dev/sda5 is mounted on /; on-line resizing required resize2fs: On-line ...


64

GUI (Ubuntu 14.04 and later): GParted v0.17 and later provide a nice GUI for this. (Older versions will refuse to resize a mounted partition). Command line (any Ubuntu version): There are three steps to this. Step 1. The partition must first be resized. If you're using LVM, it's easy, and you presumably know how to proceed. If you're using classic ...


46

On Ubuntu 10.04, relatime is part of the default mount options, unless overridden in /etc/fstab. The previous few releases had relatime explicitly in /etc/fstab. relatime gives the same speed (and flash write cycle conservation) benefits as noatime, without causing trouble to old-fashioned mail notifiers. The article you cite recommends data=writeback. ...


29

I was just doing exactly that a minute ago. What you want to do is: In the machine's settings point the CD Drive to the .iso file with your Ubuntu LiveCD Power the virtual machine on and hit F2 with the focus inside the machine. Once inside the BIOS move to the Boot tab and select CD-Rom as primary boot device. Run gParted - I think it's always there. ...


27

It can be killed with: sudo killall updatedb.mlocate Or: sudo kill -9 <PID> It runs every day by cron. Disable it with: sudo chmod -x /etc/cron.daily/mlocate And if you want to re-enable it: sudo chmod +x /etc/cron.daily/mlocate


22

A few years ago I'd say stick with ext3 but nowadays ext4 is better. A recent (May 16, 2011) round up from thegeekstuff.com sums it up rather nicely: Supports huge individual file size and overall file system size. Maximum individual file size can be from 16 GB to 16 TB Overall maximum ext4 file system size is 1 EB (exabyte). 1 EB = 1024 PB (petabyte). 1 ...


21

You cannot resize a mounted filesystem, that's why you see a lock icon. You were doing well, you booted into a Live CD and resized the NTFS partition. Now you need to enlarge the Extended partition, partitions "inside" that extended partition cannot "escape" outside. Make sure that /dev/sda6 is unmounted. If a lock icon is visible, right click on it and ...


21

Just for the record, there is a software (actually, a mini-distro) that does exactly the procedure arrange said in enzotib's answer: Parted Magic It looks like a direct conversion from NTFS to ext4, but internally the procedures are: Shrink the NTFS partition Create an ext4 partition in the empty space Move data from NTFS to ext4 until ext4 is full If ...


15

There is a utility called ext2read to browse Ext partitions in Windows (including Ext4 partitions). I haven't tried it lately. Download and execute it in your windows system. Ext2Read can also read the Wubi virtual disks. e.g. \ubuntu\disks\root.disk.


15

There's nothing to fix, and this is perfectly normal. ext4 creates a lot of overhead before any files are created. It does not mean it is "worse" than ext3. If you fill that partition with files, you will notice that ext3's (and NTFS's) overhead will grow proportionally with the files, as with ext4 it will basically remain constant forever. By ...


13

ext4 has some support through the older ext2* projects. btrfs has no current Windows support. New filesystems are always going to have a period where there's no support on another operating system and, frankly, that's going to suck. It should also be mentioned that projects that try to read the filesystem into another system are always going to give you an ...


12

EXT3/EXT4 filesystems take 5% of partition size for security etc. (e.g. in "non free disk space disk" cause). If it isn't root partition, You could change this 5% to e.g. 1% by doing: sudo tune2fs -m 1 /dev/sda3 where you should change sda3 to your partition.


12

It is safe to use. Otherwise it would not be available or have a big red warning when trying to use it. Here is a good document on ext4 and defragging. Do not expect to see dramatic benefits since ext4 is made to work without the need for defragmentation.


11

No. You can never suppose something to be 100% reliable. Journaling file systems minimise data loss in the event of an unexpected outage. Extents and barriers help even more, but cannot eliminate all associated problems. Personally, I've never experienced data loss because of file system corruption when using journaling file systems. Also, journaling is ...


11

I have found the following the answer https://www.redhat.com/archives/ext3-users/2009-January/msg00026.html, from Theodore Tso, an ext4 developer. If you set the reserved block count to zero, it won't affect performance much except if you run for long periods of time (with lots of file creates and deletes) while the filesystem is almost full ...


10

Wikipedia covers most of this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ext3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ext4 The big advantage of ext3 is journalling, which means you don't need to fsck every time you unmount uncleanly (e.g. power failure / kernel panic). ext4 makes fscking much faster, when you do need to. It's hard to know whether ext3 or ext4 will be faster ...


10

Javier Rivera's answer works, but it takes quite long for rsync to check and compare all file checksums. I found that using the following option worked better for me: rsync -rtv --modify-window=1 /source /dest The --modify-window=1 switch allows for a variance of ±1s on the timestamps. With this option enabled, timestamp comparison will be more lenient ...


9

Timestamps in FAT32 are too different from unix ones to rely on them to check for file changes, you should use also the -c switch, it will force rsync to compare all the files to detect changes instead of relying in timestamps. It will work, but it's slower. Finally, there are a couple of options in your command that can't work with FAT32 file systems. -l ...


9

Essentially, you will want to create a Samba share for the Ext4 mount point. Open-up your /etc/samba/smb.conf (in your favorite editor) and alter a few things: 1 - workgroup - you'll want to set that to the name of your network workgroup, if you have one. 2 - security = user - even if this line is commented-out, user-level security is the default for ...


9

According to the tests by phoronix it always depends on many factors. In one case Btrfs will be doing much better than EXT4 when reading large files on an SSD. Similarly while considering Disk transaction performance, Ext4 can perform better than the later. You can have a look through these tests here, here and here (WARNING: Lengthy articles). But summing ...


9

No, there is no way that I am aware of. The only way, as you said, is to backup->format->restore.


9

Because no single file system is the best in all situations, determining which file system is the best for your application is not always easy. However, as you will see for yourself, picking the right file system can offer performance gains in excess of 95%. Linux File Systems. Why so many? There are three main reasons why there are so many File Systems ...


9

Yes, it still may make sense to use noatime as of Ubuntu 12.10 relatime is a default mount option. And relatime is much better than atime. The former requires a write for the first read after a write, the latter requires a write for every read. But with noatime each read is free of a write. This basically means that the number of writes to a disk for ...


9

Take a look at fsarchiver It can be found on the latest SystemRescueCD Reportedly made by the same guy who authored partimage. It sports a lot of improvements including: - ext4 support - ntfs support - file-level instead of block-level - compression using multiple cores Basically, after a partition is saved/compressed it can be restored to different ...


9

According to one of its developers, Akira Fujita, e4defrag needs more feedback - which IMO translates to "not ready for prime time". I wouldn't use any defragmentation tool that's not thoroughly tested. Here are some interesting slides from his recent talk at the LinuxCon 2010. e4defrag is now in the development version of Ubuntu 12.04, see its man page ...


9

sudo touch /forcefsck sudo reboot You've got a typo- you're touching /forcefcsk. The "c" and the "s" are swapped. fsck is short for FileSystemChecK.


9

I know this is a really old thread, but I recently had to solve this problem so I wanted to post how to force the OS to fix problems found with fsck during bootup (for 12.04). You do need to run the command sudo touch /forcefsck. This will cause it to perform an fsck on the next boot. You can see the results of the fsck in /var/log/boot.log. However, you ...


9

One way in which the ext4 file system keeps fragmentation in-check, is with the process of delayed allocation (ext4's default allocation mode). Delayed allocation works by deferring the mapping of newly-written file data blocks to disk blocks in the filesystem until writeback time. This works by allocating most of the blocks for a file at the same ...


9

Use clonezilla. It will allow you to clone your current system including the mbr without actually copying unused space that dd does hence doing it faster Since its reading / writing on a filesystem level you can only use it on a supported filesystem, on the contrary to dd, which works on a device level, allowing the copy of any filesystem. Clonezilla's ...


9

To enable extended attributes the user_xattr option in /etc/fstab Example: /dev/sda2 /media/mount_point ext4 auto,users,user_xattr 0 2 You would then re-mount the partition. and the man page : http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/precise/man5/attr.5.html I looked at the kernel configs here and support for xattr is enabled by default , so no need ...



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