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22

A few years ago I'd say stick with ext3 but nowadays ext4 is better. A recent (May 16, 2011) round up from thegeekstuff.com sums it up rather nicely: Supports huge individual file size and overall file system size. Maximum individual file size can be from 16 GB to 16 TB Overall maximum ext4 file system size is 1 EB (exabyte). 1 EB = 1024 PB (petabyte). 1 ...


10

Wikipedia covers most of this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ext3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ext4 The big advantage of ext3 is journalling, which means you don't need to fsck every time you unmount uncleanly (e.g. power failure / kernel panic). ext4 makes fscking much faster, when you do need to. It's hard to know whether ext3 or ext4 will be faster ...


9

You should probably not make a filesystem on an entire disk. Instead, you should make it on a partition on the disk (which would be something like /dev/sdc1 rather than /dev/sdc). If you don't already have a partition you can make that first. The partition can (essentially) be the size of the whole disk, if you like. Even when you only want one partition on ...


8

ext2/3 filesystems have a certain percentage of blocks reserved for a "privileged" user; a filesystem might appear as "almost full" yet only root can write to it. My guess is that you are hitting this limit. By default 5% of the total filesystem size is reserved for the root user. Both the reserved percentage and the "privileged" user can be changed with ...


7

If you're not booting off the partition (is this even possible without using wubi?) and it's at least half free then just use gparted (paste apt:gparted in firefox). Run it from the menu. Find out the name of your partition using fdisk -l in a terminal. The partition named something like /dev/sda* where * is a number. Or look through the list in the upper ...


5

Sounds like the 5% reservation for the root user. You can change that with sudo tune2fs -m 1 /dev/sdc5 to 1% like in this example. If it is just a storage partition 0% should be OK too.


4

I had the same problem. I found this which had the answer: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Ext4#Migrating_files_to_extents Migrating files to extents Warning: Do NOT use the following method with Mercurial repository that have been cloned locally, as doing so will corrupt the repository. It might also corrupt other hard link in the filesystem. Even ...


4

Yes it is possible just change it because ext4 is the default I think all Acronis product work with the follow file system for example Acronis® True Image™ Home 2012 but Acronis® Disk Director® 11 Home doesn't support ext4. Why use Acronis when there's Clonezilla or G4l? Has many more features and is open source If you’re a Linux user, you’ve likely been ...


4

http://launchpad.net/e2defrag.


4

There is no -y option for mkfs.ext3, you can check by readin its manual page (man mkfs.ext3). However, there is a program called yes that is specifically designed to do what you want: NAME yes - output a string repeatedly until killed So, you could run: yes | mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdc However, bear in mind that you are attempting to create a filesystem ...


3

It'll be a definite run [of a file system check] if I'm booting after letting the laptop runs out of battery. On every mount, Ext3 will simply replay the journal, eliminating the need to do a full file system check. But really, please avoid a hard shut down of the system! It's not a good practice if your data is valuable. Instaed, let Ubuntu just shut ...


3

There is no direct conversion possible. You will need to copy you data to another drive/partition, change the filesystem, then copy the data back :-(


3

Forget shred (which doesn't work in all cases: no matter what the filesystem is, concurrent activity can throw it off), and encrypt any sensitive file. See these questions: http://askubuntu.com/questions/1081/how-do-i-encrypt-my-home-partition http://askubuntu.com/questions/4796/how-can-i-simply-password-protect-a-file ...


3

shred is fine if you want to shred an entire partition, and most will probably be destroyed if you shred a single file, but possibly not all. If you shred the entire partition then you work below the level of the filesystem (and will have to recreate a filesystem after the fact). This will delete everything so should only be done after making a copy of all ...


3

Before ext4 came out, I switched my mythtv backend to JFS for all of it's drives simply because JFS offered the best speed vs. CPU usage when dealing with files that were 1G of larger. This was especially true when comparing delete speed with ext3. The one area I have seen some question is dealing with lots and lots of files being open at the same time. ...


3

I would bet money that your freezing problem is not due to your ancient ext2 filesystem, but that it is related to your hard drive because I bet you are running out of RAM and the system is swapping processes out to disk. You can check free memory with the free command. If you see swap used, then that explains your problem. If you want to monitor the swap ...


2

By default 5% on a ext3 file system are reserved for root. You can change this using sudo tune2fs -m 0 /dev/sdc5


2

Ext3 is like NTFS for Windows, it's THE Linux filesystem, so you shouldn't have any problem recovering your data with Ubuntu (or any other linux distribution). If you don't see the disk maybe is becayse you are not looking in the right place ;) First of all there are no drive letters in Linux: disk partitions (or more precisely the filesystem inside a ...


2

Yes, the longer file name takes up a few more bytes of space in the directory, but a few bytes is insignificant compared to the size of the file, even if the file is only a single 4K block.


2

Yes. And you should be able to see that because the format box will automatically be checked. If you want to enable the two main features of ext4 that can be added without reformatting, run sudo tune2fs -O extents,uninit_bg /dev/sda1 and then sudo e2fsck -f /dev/sda1.


2

You can use open-source tool: TestDisk to repair the corrupt partition table. Example of repair a damaged partition table: http://geekyprojects.com/storage/how-to-repair-a-damaged-partition-table-or-mbr/


2

It shouldn't result in file system corruption (it is a journaling file system, after all), but it may result in lost work. The reason for the behaviour is that spinning up the disk uses power, and by waiting longer before performing a journal commit it may be possible to perform multiple writes in one go, resulting in fewer spin ups and better battery life. ...


2

It is posible to convert. FAT32 --> NTFS: see "Convert FAT32 partition to NTFS without data loss?" NTFS --> ext: use anyconvertfs, see this answer. However, by definition, any conversion is risky, and the only way to guarantee you will "keep the data" is to do a back-up... but in that case it's simpler to delete partition -> create partition -> copy as ...


2

By default ext2, ext3 and ext4 reserve 5% of all space for the root user and to prevent fragmentation (see this mailing list). However as this particular disk is used for archiving data that doesn't change much, I have taken the liberty to change this percentage to 1%, using the command: sudo tune2fs -m 1 /dev/sdb the last item /dev/sdb reflecting the ...


1

I found an answer to my problem. I will have to create a link to my .ko file - something that can be done using these commands: sudo ln –s /path/to/module.ko /lib/modules/`uname –r` sudo depmod –a sudo modprobe module This will take care of the module issue. I was doing it incorrectly and hence having problem. Thanks to Stack Overflow posts to help me get ...


1

Don't use ext2. It has no journal, so like FAT, has to be checked after an unclean shutdown.


1

Ubuntu One does not sync these, as they are file system specific. Only data within the files themselves is synchronized.


1

The / folder of Ubuntu should be ext, it can be ext, ext2, ext3, or ext4, but better off stick with ext4. However, you will be able to read and write data to FAT32 or NTFS or ext partitions, so you just need your / partitions(analogous to the C: drive for windows) to be ext.


1

Ext4 is preferred. It has better performance than ext3, and FAT32 is not a journaled filesystem, so is at higher risk of data loss. The way you share it (i.e. NFS, Samba/CIFS) should abstract the filesystem itself, allowing a Windows system to interact with it, even though Windows doesn't natively handle ext4.



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