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1

You have set the environment variable JAVA_HOME, but this is only a value used by applications that want to know where the JRE or JDK are. The PATH is what your shell is looking in when you try to run executables. So when you type java -version, it is looking in the JDK folder. Note that java is actually inside $JAVA_HOME/bin. That's why it can't find ...


1

First, you have a typo in export line. It should be export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin No space, add a $ character before JAVA_HOME, add /bin However fixing above line may not fix your problem in installing java. The easiest way to install java is by using webup8 ppa: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/java sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install ...


0

The PATH is what the env program uses to search for your executables. You can change this per-user (in the $HOME/.bashrc); for that you would nano $HOME/.bashrc and go to the last line, add a new line export PATH=$PATH:/usr/local/rvm/rubies/ruby-2.1.1/bin To change it at a system level you sudo naon /etc/login.defs and change this line ENV_PATH ...


0

One method I just thought of is to make an external .conf file that creates this variable and include it in the snort.conf like this: #snort.conf #ipvar HOME_NET any include ./HOME_NET.conf Then, create a HOME_NET.conf file that looks like this: ipvar HOME_NET 192.168.1.0/16 and change/replace the contents of HOME_NET.conf with an .sh script during ...


4

Environment variables are set in /etc/environment. You will find the $PATH variable in this file. This variable stores the path to binaries in various locations. To add /opt/lampp/bin to the location searched for binary files, just append this path preceded by a : to the path variable. For example, if the $PATH variable was: ...


0

To open an interactive php shell, just type in a terminal: php -a As for opening a file, just: php filename.php


1

As an alternative to /opt/lampp/bin/php, to run a php script from the command line, you just need to install php5-cli: sudo apt-get install php5-cli And run your script with: php myscript.php


0

In bash using compgen: compgen -v | while read line; do echo $line=${!line};done


1

This is an untested idea: Copy /usr/share/applications/terminator.desktop to ~/.local/share/applications Edit the local .desktop copy so it sets TERM when starting terminator


1

It's not related to a $PATH error, on 13.10 you need to install the 13.04 ia32-libs package. You can download the ia32-libs package from the raring repository. Download it from a mirror and install it manually, then you should run the arm-none-linux-gnueabi-gcc executable. sudo dpkg -i ./ia32-libs_20090808ubuntu36_amd64.deb


-2

the easiest way to fix your path is via .bashrc or .zshrc by editing it with vim or nano. nano ~/.bashrc that said imo your path is a a serious mess that may explain why you may be having problems.


1

You simply use your favorite editor to change the file. Example: Open a terminal window: Ctrl+Alt+T gedit ~/.bashrc Now I'm not sure that .bashrc is the right file to edit. If the application in question always is started from bash, it works, but otherwise .profile is probably a better choice. Please read more about environment variables at ...


0

I use Stephen Collyer's bash_path_funcs, described in Linux Journal way back in 2000: http://www2.linuxjournal.com/lj-issues/issue71/3645.html http://www2.linuxjournal.com/lj-issues/issue72/3768.html http://www2.linuxjournal.com/lj-issues/issue73/3935.html The addpath function adds an entry to a path only if it is not there in the first place. ...


0

You can change the http/https/ftp proxy environmental variables using the following commands: export http_proxy='http://user:password@prox-server:3128' export https_proxy='http://user:password@prox-server:3128' export ftp_proxy='http://user:password@prox-server:3128' as a one-liner: export {http,https,ftp}_proxy='http://user:password@prox-server:3128' ...


0

If you already put your .so file in /usr/lib/python2.7/dist-packages, try to make a new python file (in the same dir) named as 'my_lib.py'. Put the below code in it: def __bootstrap__(): global __bootstrap__, __loader__, __file__ import sys, pkg_resources, imp __file__ = pkg_resources.resource_filename(__name__,'hello_world.so') __loader__ = ...


1

First try running this command to configure the libraries: sudo ldconfig If that doesn't solve it, you'll need to add these lines to ~/.profile file: export PYTHONPATH=$PYTHONPATH:/usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:/usr/local/lib This assumes that you actually have python2.7 installed and that ...


0

"You're doing it wrong". In an upstart job, variables aren't set with export, but with env. So change your declaration to env NODE_ENV=production Things should work then. Do note that upstart jobs are not shell scripts. They follow a declarative syntax. They can contain shell scripts but these have to be enclosed in script..end script (also, see similar ...


0

You have incorrectly set your JAVA_HOME variable in your ~/.bash_profile file. Change your JAVA_HOME variable to: export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/java-7-openjdk-i386/ and then do source ~/.bash_profile This should resolve your issue.


0

Ubuntu uses the update-alternatives system to manage which installation of the Java JDK or JRE should be used. This allows you to have multiple versions of Java installed, but still control which one is used by default. This is why which java doesn't show the version you installed; /usr/bin/java is just a symlink. If you run ls -l /usr/bin/java you'll see ...


1

You can select java version using update-alternatives command. Run below command in terminal. sudo update-alternatives --config java And type selection number that you want to use. Like this: Caution: The above description is the procedures for changing a default version. It is not an answer of this question, but should help you set the JAVA home



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