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alternative to old truecrypt is Veracrypt. Supposedly continuing where truecrypt left off. As Veracrypt can encrypt folders, you can have a LUKS volume with a Veracryt container with your photos of the president's wife naked, and they probably won't get to them. However, since the government pays Intel for backdoors into your PC with the firmware chips, who ...


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I upgraded 15.10 to 16.04 and when trying to access my .private folder on an external drive from a backup with sudo ecryptfs-recover-private I was getting the same error. When I did the same thing from another 14.04 notebook everything was working as it should. So this might be a problem with 16.04?


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The clipboard seems readable by any program, so as long as you trust your OS & programs it should be safe enough - KeePass uses the clipboard, I think LastPass does too? If you're running malware you're already "hooped." But I don't think the clipboard is routinely written to a file (unless you run a clipboard manager / saving program like ClipMan) but ...


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After seeing the curious post I decided to do a little research. It appears that in any windowing system (e.g. X windows, etc) you have a common space that holds the contents of the clipboard. As such, it is available to any program that can pull from the clipboard. As such, I would expect the clipboard to be just as insecure as any other input device with ...


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Using dd it sounds like you're copying the whole drive every time, 4min is fast but still probably a ton of unnecessary copying. Why not only copy changed files, from the mounted / decrypted drive? An rsync style backup script or program probably exists, or track files modified or changed (crc, md5, etc) with your own script/program. Should be a lot faster &...


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You may want to investigate how some common encryption schemes like AES work, keys are actually 16 to 64 bytes (maybe 256 or 512?). Having a 10 billion byte passphrase won't really add anything except confusion for you. Also consider that if a government is investigating you, they could search every device & drive you have anywhere (house, car, work, ...


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Startup asks for a password to decrypt the swap partition specified in /etc/cryptab. Comment out the line in /etc/cryptab to disable the use of an encrypted swap. The /etc/fstab above is not configured to use /dev/mapper/ctyptswap1 anyway. NVMe should not be a contributing factor.


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Impossible. You cannot add yourself back to the disk because of the strict security policies. Answers here have not made the testing environment for them. They have not managed to test their own answers. Much reproduction what I I have already tested there.


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I suggest VeraCrypt. VeraCrypt is a port of TrueCrypt but is still maintained. It uses substantially stronger encryption than TrueCrypt ever did. You can download VeraCrypt here. For your stated purpose, you're going to want the command-line version, so install that. Then you'll want to encrypt with a long and impossible-to-remember randomized ...


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I would say the easiest way to do this would be to use Enigmail. Just install it and follow the instructions. Quoting your link: Thunderbird Thunderbird supports OpenPGP through the enigmail plugin. Enigmail is available in the "Main" repository. sudo apt-get install enigmail Configure OpenPGP support in Thunderbird under Enigmail->...


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It can be incredibly beneficial to encrypt everything but your bootloader; obviously, your bootloader must remain cleartext. One answer here suggests to use the alternate installer to encrypt almost everything, but include unencrypted content on the internal hdd. This invites an "Evil Maid" attack: during a period when your computer is physically insecure an ...


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According to http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/trusty/man4/tpm.4freebsd.html#contenttoc3 the Supported tpm modules are: · Atmel 97SC3203 · Broadcom BCM0102 · Infineon IFX SLD 9630 TT 1.1 and IFX SLB 9635 TT 1.2 · Intel INTC0102 · Sinosun SNS SSX35 · STM ST19WP18 · Winbond WEC WPCT200 If ...


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Ok, figured it out. The UUID of sdb3_crypt (where / and swap are located) somehow wasn't right in /etc/crypttab. I verified this by comparing the UUIDs listed in /etc/crypttab with those listed in /dev/disk/by-uuid/. No idea how that got wrong, but I must have fat fingered it somewhere along the way. I corrected /etc/crypttab with the correct UUID of /dev/...


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I know that the portion after pub ABCDE/ is the public key and the portion after sec ABCDE/ is the private key. You're mistaking the algorithm identification field with the key ID. sec ABCDE/XXXXXXXL 2016-06-09 uid My Name (comment) <example@email.com> sub ABCDE/XXXXXXXM 2016-06-09 sub ABCDE/XXXXXXXN 2016-06-10 The field you'...


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Finally I managed to solve my problem. Although in a different way. I installed thunderbird, created an account for my email address. Next I installed enigmail extention. From enigmail setup wizard I created key-pair for my acoount and a revocation certificate. But here problem was still not gone. I went to enigmail key management then right clicked on my ...


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MBR=Master Boot Record. It is the keeper of the partition table data and it is always located on the first partition of (the first) disk. I guess you meant moving GRUB to another partition (possibly the Ubuntu partition). Here is how: how to move grub boot from one partition to another in linux. Ext2 is an old partition standard. Maybe you should move to ...


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You may install keepassx. That's exactly what it does. It encrypts and stores all kinds of passwords and you can also use keyfiles for extra protection. sudo apt-get install keepassx


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Encrypt them (perhaps just use the standard utility to zip them up and use a password, or even several layers) and then place them somewhere where you know where they are but others would not, if you want to keep them really hidden then give them names that don't make them look out of the ordinary, you could also put a . infront of each in the filename to ...


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The act of encrypting also implies you have to abide by the rules set for encrypting. One of those rules is: NO automatic login. Your password is required to unwrap the mount pass phrase used to decrypt your home. If you want automatic login: remove the encryption. I don't see the "Asked on Login" option, so this menu has presumably changed since 13.04. ...


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Yes, it will. If your SSD is hardware encrypted, the new laptop you're moving it will need to support SED, which, in your case, is no problem, since you will be putting it into another laptop of the same make / model. If you only have home directory encryption (Set up with "Encrypt my home folder" during installation), or another form of software-only ...


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from your screenshot of the disks tool i can see that you are trying to create an lvm physical volume using the extended partition (/dev/sda1), you can't do this because an extended partition is only a container for other partitions, in this case your btrfs (/dev/sda5) and swap partitions (/dev/sda6), but not in an lvm compatible way. This is also the reason ...


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A lot of the suggestions I would have made have already been put forth in this thread. Basically, openssl is really the easiest way to go about encrypting a file or script. However, I would caution against using AES-256 just because it is not available in all versions of openssl on some platforms. Most newer OSes...i.e. Linux have it. But others such as ...



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