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I did some testing that indicated eCryptfs has a minimum file size of 12,288 bytes, and seemed to add about 8k to larger files (as Colin correctly says). For example, a file that's 10,485,760 bytes ends up encrypted as 10,493,952 bytes, so increased by 8,192 bytes. Not significant for large files, but for lots of tiny files (like home configuration files ...


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Approximately 8K per file for the header information.


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Thanks for the reply. It wasn't long at all before I had aborted the installation. It should have never proceeded to do anything before I continued to the next step. For one thing, the Ubiquity developers should have realised that many people only upgrade from LTS to LTS so might not know about the new changes in encryption. In previous releases, I was ...


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ecryptfs-recover-private doesn't have to search through every file, if you tell it where your old encrypted home is then it will only look there. You can search yourself, looking for any encrypted files, for example with a GUI search utility, or find [mountpoint] -type f -iname "*ecryptfs*" To see exactly what ecryptfs-recover-private does, just look at ...


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How much time did the failed/aborted installer spend writing to the drive? It would take a long time to overwrite all 600GB, and I'm not sure but just setting up LUKS it may not attempt (the recommended secure practice) to overwrite with zeros before creating a filesystem - and it didn't successfully create a filesystem from the "no recognizable filesystem" ...


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This will be a bit of a simplification, but I'll try to go through the process of accessing a file on an encrypted filesystem. For example, let's say a the beginning of the encrypted filesystem there's a file table; let's say we want to read /foo.bar. So, the first thing we do is read the beginning of the partition, decrypt it, and look through it for the ...


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Modern computers can do billions of operations per second, so it doesn't surprise me that encryption and decryption are fast. This is how I would intuitively rank how fast computers are at doing things: Doing calculations within memory (especially L1 and L2 memory), extremely fast Reading from local storage, less fast (solid state disks are faster than ...


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How does AES / Rijndael Encryption in general work? This page has a fun A Stick Figure Guide to the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) that looks easy to understand, though it looks to be 50+ images, for example these two: and It's far too much to duplicate it all here, but if you have to have an all-in-one image it's this one: Or, there's a ...


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The software you are mentioning isn't safer than the one built into Ubuntu. No need to purchase anything special. The software you are talking about uses "256-bit AES encryption" according to their website. You can have an encryption using the same algorithm using the "cryptsetup" on Ubuntu with a regular thumb drive, see for example: ...


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I want to remove the decryption... I want to decrypt my drive so that i don't have to use dislocker tool every time I need to access my drive. Kind of like turning off bitlocker permanently. That's similar to re-formatting any drive with a new filesystem, but to keep the files there are a few more steps: Copy the files somewhere else (in this ...


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I just ran into the same issue. What had happened is that the key was stored in the old format: cat /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key SSH PRIVATE KEY FILE FORMAT 1.1 <encoded private key here> However the newer sshd is expecting the newer base64 encoded keys. cat /etc/ssh/ssh_host_rsa_key -----BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY----- <base64 encoding here> ...


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The processor uses dedicated instruction set. It is possible because of it, AES-NI. It enables fast encryption and decryption or you can say it cuts the overhead. It is fast because it is hardware implementation, as explained here. You can check about performance impacts here and they are worth it for added security.


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This here is why long ago I got convinced to really encrypt also my swap partition. Try the following commands: First find out your swap device, then find out if your user password (or any string critical for you) is stored somewhere on the swap memory: $ sudo swapon --summary Filename Type ... ...


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That /home/.ecryptfs/username folder holds the encrypted contents of your (username's) home, you should be able to see the decrypted contents at /home/username or just ~ (if it's being decrypted successfully when you login). I think running du -sh ~ and du -sh /home/.ecryptfs/username/ should show similar sizes. Deleting files in your (mounted) home should ...


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The cryptsetup configuration for boot time is stored in /etc/crypttab you will need to either remove the reference to the partition here or add the noauto option to it.


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As long as you ensure that non of the data on the encrypted partition is needed to enable a system boot you could just remove the reference to it from /etc/crypttab to stop it from being auto-mounted at boot. Alternatively you could leave the reference in place but add the noauto option. As for the swap the easiest solution here is just to have it be ...


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Support for resizing LUKS partitions is being added right now to KDE Partition Manager. Grow support is already done in unreleased git versions and shrinking will be added soon. It will probably take a while until it reaches distributions and in particular Ubuntu but it will work at some point. Growing and shrinking LUKS in action: ...


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The easiest and most fail safe way will be to save your files in password protected archive files, 'zip' being the most popular archive file format supporting such protection. This format is supported directly in most OS's including Ubuntu and Windows, without installing any other applications. If you want complete drive encryption you'll have to install a ...


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Assuming that you have backed up all the important data and the sdcard is mounted at /dev/sdX and all partitions on the sdcard have been unmounted from your system sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdX bs=5M count=1 will erase the partition information from the head of the drive and the system will now "see" the drive as unpartitioned and from here your can ...


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@waltinator, as stated on a PerlMonks.org thread the Internet Archive's WayBack Machine http://web.archive.org/web/20061213023831/http://www.netspinner.co.uk/Resources.html has a working package of pathfunc.tgz


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Assumptions: Because I cannot comment on your post I am going to have to assume some things: Your SSD mount point is located at /dev/sda Your bigger SSD mount point is located at /dev/sdb You are using LUKS full disk encryption Your encrypted partition is /dev/sda1 The unecrypted mount point where your file system is located is /dev/mapper/sda1_crypt ...


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You can use vipe to edit pipelines: SYNOPSIS command1 | vipe | command2 DESCRIPTION vipe allows you to run your editor in the middle of a unix pipeline and edit the data that is being piped between programs. Your editor will have the full data being piped from command1 loaded into it, and when you save, that data will be ...


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You need to mount the encrypted directory (either by logging in with the user account owning it or with ecryptfs-mount-private) and run Disk Usage on the mount point. Then you will see the file names.


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gnp's answer was pretty good and definitely pointed me in the right direction (my problem was caused by a broken cryptroot setup). However, it wasn't quite sufficient to debug the problem) This can be due to cryptsetup not mapping encrypted volume. This means that initramfs does not have and lvm volume to mount, if you are using and encrypted lvm physical ...


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One solution could be setting up cronjobs to lock/unlock the game directory. To do so follow the steps below. Make sure cron-daemon is installed sudo apt-get install cron Prepare the game directory to be owned by root (alter the paths to fit your situation) sudo chown -v root:root ~/GameDirectory sudo chmod -v u+rwx ~/GameDirectory sudo chmod -v ...


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If the only reason you want to encrypt your Ubuntu partition is because of fear for malware from Windows, then you probably don't want to do it. It is almost impossible for Windows malware to harm Ubuntu as Ubuntu generally speaking does not understand EXE files (unless you use Wine). If you want to encrypt your Ubuntu partition because you fear that ...


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That is working as intended. If you want to set a password using the useradd command, you are supposed to give a hashed version of the password to useradd. So if you provide your plain text password when the system validates that user's login it will fail since the stored password would not be the hashes version of the password you would expect it to have. ...


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Thank you everyone who gave feedback! I tried the disks on different laptops now and they work fine here. So it appears that there is something wrong with the laptop I had been using, where after some random time the connection gets interrupted, irrespective of which USB plug I use.


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There are several options, encrypt just some files with eCryptfs or EncFS, or a whole partition or drive with dm-crypt/LUKS (very similar to TrueCrypt, in fact cryptsetup can open (most?) TrueCrypt devices). See archlinux's informative wiki about disk encryption. LUKS encrypts entire partitions/drives, and should be installed by default on recent ...


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If you overwrote the files, they're gone. If testdisk couldn't find the partition, it's essentially gone. You could try photorec, it may find some files yet, but a backup copy would be best. If you still have a copy somewhere, run ecryptfs-recover-private As always, remember that if files are important enough they should have a good backup somewhere.


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Right-- snaps need to include all of their dependencies, so for instance the ownCloud snap bundles its own Apache, its own MySQL, etc. This is doable, but it's something you'd have to support in the snap that bundles the web server.


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There's a package in Ubuntu called ecryptfs which will give you a nice portable encryption option for your USB stick. The following is a snippet from the ubuntu server guide ecryptfs tutorial Using eCryptfs First, install the necessary packages. From a terminal prompt enter: sudo apt-get install ecryptfs-utils Now mount the partition to be encrypted: ...


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Looking at the unmounted encrypted home directory of a non-logged-in user, I see some unencrypted files (well they're really directories and links): $ /bin/ls -la /home/walt total 12 dr-x------ 3 w3 walt 4096 Apr 9 22:12 . drwxr-xr-x 13 root root 4096 Sep 1 2015 .. lrwxrwxrwx 1 walt walt 56 Oct 22 2011 Access-Your-Private-Data.desktop -> ...


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Most people don't realise that software encryption of your drive is unnecessary if they've got an SSD. Just set a hard drive password because the data in flash is almost certainly encrypted anyway, and the drive password protects the key. Check the specs of your drive to verify this.


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First and foremost, I believe there isn't any encryption which can be deemed 100% secure. The reason for that is, it is human made. Despite that the evolution of hardware in the past 20 years has prooven that nothing is secure forever. Best example is here the long time deemed secure md5 one way encryption. But back to your question, your best security is ...


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What else you should know about encrypting your home folder is that the data in it is not accessible when you are not logged in. If you have some automated or external process (like a crontab) that tries to access this data, it will work great while you are watching it, but fail when you are not watching it. This is very frustrating to debug.



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