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If you can see the files, you can change the last step. Press Alt-F2 and type gksu nautilus + Enter. This will launch Nautilus with root rights and you should be able to do whatever you want with the files. I am not 100% sure gksu exists on the Live CD but if it doesn't, go ahead and install it: sudo apt-get install gksu. It will disappear after the next ...


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The chances of anyone else ever having this problem are slim (maybe if someone followed the same guide), but here is how I solved it. Using grub-customizer, I reverted the grub menu to default. Make sure that the menu entry you wish to use is script: linux not script: custom. Then I removed the "Advanced options for Ubuntu" and deleted my old entry. Save ...


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I had a similar issue when installing Ubuntu server from usb where the installation couldn't mount the CD-ROM to install files. The fix that worked for me was as follows. Open terminal Plug your usb drive into your pc. Type sudo fdisk -l Make note of the usb drive mount point. Sudo umount (usb drive partition, I.E. /dev/sdb1, /dev/sdc1, etc) Run sudo dd ...


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I use Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, but I still had problems shutting down as well. The solution I found was just to go into the Terminal and type sudo shutdown -h now, but your problem seems different. I see you've already tried that option. Maybe specify a scheduled shutdown instead, or do sudo shutdown instead. Often the -h now command messes up shutting the PC down. ...


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The new hashing algorithm will be used only when creating new hashes. The old hashes in /etc/shadow will be still supported. All users would have to change the password to apply the new algorithm to their hashed password. Being able to rehash existing passwords would really beat the purpose.


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The solution is to install Kleopatra, to export the private key using KGpg and import it in Kleopatra. Afterwards I was able to select the key in KMail for signing. Doesn't make much sense but it worked that way.


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As far as defeating the encryption on an otherwise locked down machine, look up the liquid nitrogen RAM attacks. It's always a question of how secure you want to be, not being undefeatable. If an attacker needs a dewer of LN on hand to defeat you, you're fairly likely to see him coming.


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If your root partition is not encrypted, or if you're not sure, try this: Boot off a Ubuntu install DVD or USB stick and select Try Ubuntu. If you are able to see your files, edit /etc/fstab and remove the line that looks like this: /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-swap_1 none swap sw 0 0 Reboot and it shouldn't ask you for a ...


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Since I can't comment yet, I'll use the medium of an answer. This may help: Encrypting Ubuntu 15.04..?


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This might work with LUKS encrypted containers. You have to create one with cryptsetup -s 512 --hash sha256 luksFormat /dev/partitionNode (Soon to be released KDE Partition Manager 2.2 can also create luks partitions but at the moment you would have to compile it yourself) Then open your encrypted device with cryptsetup open /dev/partitionNode cryptName ...


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The conflict has been caused by an invalid line in the /home/user/.gnupg/gpg.conf file. This particular line pinentry-program /usr/local/bin/pinentry-gtk-2 had been added by the user for Enigmail to work (troubleshooting item 'Resolving issues with GnuPG 2.x and gpg-agent') and had been worked like a charm for a long time. Apparently there must have been ...


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So the script copying from the windows server to your ubuntu server's encrypted home (with eCryptfs right?) works OK, while you're logged in I'm assuming. Then later when you're not logged in, another script can not access your encrypted home. That's by design, nothing is supposed to be able to access your encrypted home unless you're logged in. You could ...


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If you want to use it like encfs you can do it with the following entry in /etc/fstab /tmp/.geheim /tmp/geheim ecryptfs rw,no_sig_cache,ecryptfs_fnek_sig=1f7aefb9e239099f,ecryptfs_cipher=aes,ecryptfs_key_bytes=32,ecryptfs_enable_filename_crypto=y,ecryptfs_passthrough=n,passphrase_passwd=geheimpw,user,noauto 0 0 geheim is the german-word for secret, but ...


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I had similar problem and ended here. I was migrating my system to another hard drive and have the same user with encrypted home on both old and new system. I tried ecryptfs-recover-private /media/old_disk/home/my_name/.Private but that directory was in fact symbolic link to /home/.ecryptfs/my_name/.Private/ The target directory existed, but ...


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After editing /etc/crypttab, run sudo dpkg-reconfigure lvm2 in a terminal.


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You have to wipe your hard drive to encrypt whole drive. So, Windows is not in your hard anymore. Windows and other data on the hard drive are been erased. If you want to Windows, you have to install it again.


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To edit the group membership status and re-add yourself to the sudo group you must first access the encrypted, volume-managed file systems. The latter part is the same as for file recovery in such a situation. To summarize the sequence of necessary steps and link each one to more detailed instructions: Boot from a live DVD/USB an choose "Try Ubuntu". ...


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You can install polarssl and dislocker on Ubuntu 16.04 by following Open terminal and type sudo apt-get install libmbedcrypto0 libmbedtls-dev libfuse-dev Then you can Install dislocker from source using git Open terminal and type commands below. $ git clone https://github.com/Aorimn/dislocker.git $ cd dislocker $ cmake . $ make $ sudo make install ...


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You are trying to mount /dev/sda5/home. Given how you have run cryptsetup, you should be trying to mount /dev/mapper/myvolume


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Boot from installation media and select "Try ubuntu". Open/decrypt with cryptsetup, Mount the local disk, chroot to it, and re-add yourself!


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It's a standard SATA drive. There should be no reason you can't. Hard drives don't come encrypted out of the box.


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You can create the swap in an extended partition and come around that 4 partition limit this way.


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For completeness' sake, I post the solution we found during our conversation in the comments section as an answer: First of all, you are probably able to boot into your Linux system, you may just not be able to log in graphically, since graphical login usually tries to read/write in your home directory. You can still try to log in using a virtual console ...


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I did some testing that indicated eCryptfs has a minimum file size of 12,288 bytes, and seemed to add about 8k to larger files (as Colin correctly says). For example, a file that's 10,485,760 bytes ends up encrypted as 10,493,952 bytes, so increased by 8,192 bytes. Not significant for large files, but for lots of tiny files (like home configuration files ...


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Approximately 8K per file for the header information.


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Thanks for the reply. It wasn't long at all before I had aborted the installation. It should have never proceeded to do anything before I continued to the next step. For one thing, the Ubiquity developers should have realised that many people only upgrade from LTS to LTS so might not know about the new changes in encryption. In previous releases, I was ...


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ecryptfs-recover-private doesn't have to search through every file, if you tell it where your old encrypted home is then it will only look there. You can search yourself, looking for any encrypted files, for example with a GUI search utility, or find [mountpoint] -type f -iname "*ecryptfs*" To see exactly what ecryptfs-recover-private does, just look at ...


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How much time did the failed/aborted installer spend writing to the drive? It would take a long time to overwrite all 600GB, and I'm not sure but just setting up LUKS it may not attempt (the recommended secure practice) to overwrite with zeros before creating a filesystem - and it didn't successfully create a filesystem from the "no recognizable filesystem" ...


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This will be a bit of a simplification, but I'll try to go through the process of accessing a file on an encrypted filesystem. For example, let's say a the beginning of the encrypted filesystem there's a file table; let's say we want to read /foo.bar. So, the first thing we do is read the beginning of the partition, decrypt it, and look through it for the ...



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