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Easiest thing to do, if you can some how plug in your new hard drive at the same time the old one is plugged in: 1) Boot into a liveCD or liveUSB of a linux distro (any distro!) 2) Identify which /dev/sdX each one is (your 256 is likely /dev/sdb and the 512 will be /dev/sdX where x can be b, c, d...) Check out gparted and see what you see on the top right ...


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Truecrypt is (was?) probably the most well known cross platform, open source encryption tool, but unfortunately the project was mysteriously shut down by its anonymous developers just a few months ago, when the website was replaced with a message stating that it's "no longer safe." However, the general consensus in the security community seems to be that ...


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GPG, the Gnu Privacy Guard, is available for Linux, Windows and Android (and others). You'll lose some comfort though, as you would first have to decrypt manually and then open the desired file(s)...


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Try this 1 boot live CD/USB 2 Choose try Ubuntu 3 Click the Ubuntu icon in the top left 4 Search for Gparted 5 Now right click on the drive you want and choose "unmount" if it only says mound ignore this step. 6 Right click it again and choose delete 7 Right click one more time and choose format then ntfs MAKE SURE TO SET PARTITION TYPE TO PRIMARY. ...


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Files are only encrypted on the disk that has encryption. Encryption is a file system feature. Copy a file over to a non-encrypted system the file is not encrypted. are stored in other clouds, are they encrypted? Only if the cloud itself is encrypted. So that is separate from your /home encryption. If you want files to be protected from casual ...


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Dropbox itself does not encrypt the local cache of your dropbox files on your desktop PC - these are stored in a regular folder. So dropbox's own encryption would only involve what's sent over the network and/or stored on their servers. In the case of Ubuntu using home directory encryption, per-user data for virtually all apps will be stored within the ...


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They are completely separate and other then "encryption" they have nothing in common. LUKS / LVM encrypts everything but /boot. ecrypts or an encrypted /home encrytps /home/your_user name With LUKS, everything is decrypted when you boot, /swap, /home, / , etc. You can of course configure this differently , but this is how the defaults work. With ecrypts, ...


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You removed your only key in the LUKS header, not the encryption. The passphrase unlocks a master decryption key stored in the header, which in turn decrypts your partition. Cryptsetup asks you for that passphrase, but finds no matching encrypted key in the header since you removed the only keyslot that stores it. There's no way you will ever decrypt that ...


2

Well I found myself the answer by launching VLC from the terminal, that gave me: main input error: ES_OUT_RESET_PCR called Googling it, I found this: How to play DVDs after installing the recommended libraries? I had to change the region code (though I never actually changed it...) to "2" (Europe) by installing regionset: sudo apt-get install regionset ...


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Your basic problem has nothing to do with swap. Lack of swap leads to OOM crashes, not lags. I think your problem is that you have LUKS encrypted disk, and put ecryptfs encrypted home folder over it (unless, of cause, you manually called your mount point ~/.Private for some reason ) This leads to vast overusage of CPU, which only increases the more files you ...


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I was having the same issue, Eliah Kagan's answer on this other thread did the trick for me. Here's the most important bit: Open a Terminal window (Ctrl+Alt+T) or a virtual console and run: sudo swapoff -a Open /etc/crypttab (e.g., sudo nano -w /etc/crypttab or sudo -H gedit /etc/cryptab for a GUI editor) and put a # at the beginning of the line that ...


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I've taken some of the other suggestions and created a simple shell script wrapper (for the lazy) https://github.com/orionM/ssl-crypt-tools enjoy


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You will have two options to Chose when you are going through the install You can encrypt the entire drive and at boot it will require a password at each boot in order to work and will then proceed to boot normally. this is the most secure way to lock down your PC you can just encrypt your Home folder where you store documents and pictures and other files. ...


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This isn't exactly possible (with my limited understanding of these systems). An alternative would be to add a keyfile on your first encrypted partition that will give access to the other drives. When setting up a keyfile, make sure you investigate and figure out a good size, as well as measures to protect it from getting stolen. Also, I'd recommend ...


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While you might not be asked to move your mouse, it will still help build entropy/feed your random number generator. In Linux, /dev/random is your PRNG. /dev/urandom is fed by /dev/random, but provides more raw data to use. Accessing data on HDDs, moving the mouse and typing are all actions that will help feed your random number generator. Unfortunately, ...


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Make sure the hddencrypted partition is listed after the home partition, in both /etc/fstab and /etc/crypttab. As the crypttab (5) manpage states: The order of records in crypttab is important because the init scripts sequentially iterate through crypttab doing their thing. Also you could try adding the noearly option to the latter ...


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Actually I think your problem was an incomplete entry in /etc/crypttab. This line: encriptado /dev/sda6 Should instead look like this: encriptado /dev/sda6 none luks The crypttab(5) man page states: Note that all four fields are mandatory and that a missing field will lead to unspecified behaviour.


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If the password you wrote down was the unwrapped passphrase, then you should be able to mount the data by using mount and specifying ecryptfs as the filesystem type, like so: mount -t ecryptfs my_encrypted_data my_encrypted_data # yes, you can use the same directory as a mountpoint. Answer the questions accordingly (probably leave everything as ...


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Does it work if you replace "defaults" in fstab with rw,suid,dev,exec,auto,user,async,relatime (According to the mount man page, it's the same as "defaults" except for "user".)


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I found the following similar questions: OPAL Hardware Encryption on Linux, closed but links to… Free/Libre software to handle TCG OPAL 2.0-compliant Self-Encrypting Drives (SEDs)? To my knowledge a working SED setup requires a Trusted Platform Module (TPM), but the Zbox doesn't look like it features or supports TPM (1, 2). While an answer in one of ...


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If you can mount the drive from the live CD, I would set up a chroot environment, and then chroot into the partition. Then, you can use update-grub or similar to fix grub. I assume you mount your cryptfs into /mnt/ and you use grub. Setting up chroot Taken from here, run as root: for f in proc sys dev ; do mount --bind /$f /mnt/$f ; done To set up the ...


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Press the ESC button or F10 during startup to access the boot &/or BIOS menu. http://superuser.com/questions/521389/how-do-i-boot-my-samsung-laptop-from-a-cd-dvd http://forum.notebookreview.com/samsung/709669-getting-series-3-notebook-np300-v5a-boot-second-hdd.html


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@muru this is the output, & dsa6 is the swap part. sudo blkid /dev/sda1: SEC_TYPE="msdos" UUID="5450-4444" TYPE="vfat" /dev/sda2: LABEL="RECOVERY" UUID="DAAC6031AC600A79" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda3: LABEL="WinSys" UUID="E2D0647AD0645737" TYPE="ntfs" /dev/sda5: UUID="96e501a8-40ee-4d08-bcb2-2396a99abd94" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda7: ...


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This steps will work in a server environment Step 1: Backup your home directory sudo cp -rp /home/user /home/user.backup Step 2: Confirm whether everything is backup sudo ls -al /home/user.backup Step 3: Umount the home folder, because the encryption program usually mounts it to mount point e.g /home/user. You can confirm your mount point by running df ...


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I doubt it was damaged. Encrypted swap shows up as of type Unkown in tools like GParted, because the partition is filled with random data and such tools have no way of knowing that it really is an encrypted swap partition.



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