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With 0 intersection also Client is able to remotely establish ssh connection, how is it possible ? No, it is not possible. Post the verbose log of the connection (ssh -vvv host) to see that there is some intersection.


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You made some mistakes, but the main problem is in ubiquity and grub. Basically, grub gives an error message like I know /boot is encrypted. You need to set GRUB_ENABLE_CRYPTODISK=y in /etc/default/grub. I won't do it for you, so I'm going to fail and your installation will stop. An overview of the process: We use EFI mode. We install to an ...


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If you can use another network, I'd suggest the Signal Desktop alternative. It's a similar Android app and now is more developed. Since April, end-to-end encryption was added. SIGNAL DESKTOP https://github.com/WhisperSystems/Signal-Desktop


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LUKS only encrypts one device, so you could put LVM outside of LUKS - creating a LVM out of the multiple drives, then use LUKS inside it. The installer can't do that automatically, good guides abound on the web saying how to do it, could be rather long.


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It is possible to reset the login password without logging in. I do not know how a password reset affects access to an encrypted drive, however. See the procedure below: http://www.psychocats.net/ubuntu/resetpassword Good luck.


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To change the password of a given user, just use the passwd command. For example, if I wanted to change the password of admin, I would use this command: sudo passwd admin This would be used to reset your password. I hope I helped :)


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The solution was to add this secret-disk /dev/sda3 none luks to the /etc/crypttab file as admin and reboot. The passphrase will be requested, and the encrypted partition unlocked.


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I used to get an error message about setting up the encrypted swap while booting as well, but the encrypted swap was still set up properly. It seems that may be the case with you, since, when you run /etc/init.d/cryptdisks reload, it tells you it's stopping cryptswap1, which indicates that it's running. However, you can verify it. As it says, the device is ...


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It is completely impossible to recover encrypted files if you forget your password. Unlike the password to an account, which can be reset, if you forget the password to an encrypted filesystem, the files are lost forever. Atleast, that seems to be the case.


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New Answer: I realised that just editing that file won't work at least for me, for some reason the changes had been reverted. You can do this if you want: startup Ubuntu on your older kernel (via grub boot selection menu) and download Grub Customiser, Go to "General settings" tab and select the older kernel boot "predefined:" under "default entry". Save ...


2

During the installation process you'll see a window like this: Check off the second option, "Encrypt the new Ubuntu installation for security," and your disk will be fully encrypted. Here's a snapshot of my hard disk, which uses Ubuntu's default LUKS encryption:


0

If you're setting up new partitions on the new drive, you'd might as well use encrypted partitions with cryptsetup / LUKS. eCryptfs and EncFS are for encrypting some folders on a filesystem, LUKS is for encrypting an entire partition. See archwiki for a good overview of different disk encryption systems. With the new partition(s) encrypted, then you can ...


5

I have Ubuntu on a USB, but when I enter recovery mode before I can reinstall Ubuntu, I obviously get asked for the password. Is there anyway around this? I think you're missing a key step - boot from the Ubuntu USB drive. As it is, it sounds like you're not booting from the Ubuntu USB at all, and only getting stuck booting from the encrypted hard drive. ...


5

The -b option is for choosing a block device like /dev/sdb1. You can find this out by typing udisksctl unlock --help for instance; replace unlock with mount, unmount and lock and you will see the -b option is used in the same way for all 4 cases.


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The udisks command line tool udisksctl is a command-line program used to interact with the udisksd(8) daemon process.The -b option denotes a block-device like /dev/sdb1


1

If your employer is not tech savvy, the problem is more interesting. You can't assume he can set up PGP or SMIME mail, probably can't open a RAR file. Since I know almost certainly this employer uses MS Windows (don't all non-savvy people?), I know he has a zip opener in windows explorer. So If I were you, I'd 1) Make a txt file named "bank.txt" with the ...


33

If you can't remember the password, then that's all she wrote. All you can do is install a new OS. You don't need to enter recovery mode to do that. Just boot up the live USB and carry out the normal installation process. The hard drive will get overwritten.


3

For encrypted messages, you have generally two options: Public/private (or rather hybrid) cryptosystems OpenPGP belongs to this category, also S/MIME does. The recipient will provide you with a public key, which you use to encrypt the message. The recipient will be able to decrypt it with his private key. The advantage is that you do not need to transmit ...


0

A recovery suggestion: the upgrade sounds like it somehow caused the problems, so try booting from a live iso of your previous Ubuntu version, then try decrypting / recovery with it, possibly using the ecryptfs recovery program (ecryptfs-recover-home I think?). May have to restore from your backup - should always have a backup especially with encryption and/...


0

I had the same issue with an encrypted disk on a asus e200ha mint18. I was able to resolve it by updating to kernel 4.6.0-040600-generic and adding all the modules from lsmod to /etc/initramfs-tools/modules and updating initramfs followed by updating grub. I started out with 157 modules being loaded by initramfs, I'm sure not all of them are needed to make ...


3

Encryption happens as you write, not on unmount. It would be hard to do that on unmount, as it would mean caching all write operations somewhere in memory before you commit them to disk (and there would be no point in caching them unencrypted on the disk...). Not counting the fact that it would make it unreliable. If you force a shutdown without a clean ...


0

Put Windows on sda and only install grub2 on sdb where you'll have Linux. Leave the 250GB data partition unsecured. Doesn't sound like a problem


2

https://github.com/t-d-k/LibreCrypt implements LUKS compatible encryption on Windows. I haven't tried, but LUKS is the main Linux disk encryption method, with kernel support, so I think it might work.


0

alternative to old truecrypt is Veracrypt. Supposedly continuing where truecrypt left off. As Veracrypt can encrypt folders, you can have a LUKS volume with a Veracryt container with your photos of the president's wife naked, and they probably won't get to them. However, since the government pays Intel for backdoors into your PC with the firmware chips, who ...


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I upgraded 15.10 to 16.04 and when trying to access my .private folder on an external drive from a backup with sudo ecryptfs-recover-private I was getting the same error. When I did the same thing from another 14.04 notebook everything was working as it should. So this might be a problem with 16.04?


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The clipboard seems readable by any program, so as long as you trust your OS & programs it should be safe enough - KeePass uses the clipboard, I think LastPass does too? If you're running malware you're already "hooped." But I don't think the clipboard is routinely written to a file (unless you run a clipboard manager / saving program like ClipMan) but ...


2

After seeing the curious post I decided to do a little research. It appears that in any windowing system (e.g. X windows, etc) you have a common space that holds the contents of the clipboard. As such, it is available to any program that can pull from the clipboard. As such, I would expect the clipboard to be just as insecure as any other input device with ...



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