Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Master PDF Editor is a very good GUI for editing pdf also can encrypt. It also uses latest PDF standard. Used PDF Chain and Master PDF editor, both to encrypt a pdf, With PDF Chain the PDF outputed was larger and lost bookmarks, was almost double the size.


0

This happened to me once. If it is OK with you to clear everything, here is what you do: Get a windows(Xp if possible) live cd or usb boot from it and delete the partition(make a new one if you want) fresh install Ubuntu(and if you do encrypt it, don't forget to write down your password) Note: since you are new, if my answer solved your problem, dont ...


0

After many days of worry and trying to follow many other guides this one worked perfectly! http://www.howtogeek.com/116297/how-to-recover-an-encrypted-home-directory-on-ubuntu/


3

This is how I would back up secure data like this. I'm assuming because you're using ssh keys that you're comfortable on the command line. Move all the keys to a single folder. Make a tar archive of that folder. tar -cf keys.tar /path/to/keys/folder Then I'd encrypt the tar file with OpenSSL, using the command openssl aes-256-cbc -a -in keys.tar -out ...


2

Ubuntu 15.04 release notes says Known Issues It is not all good news however. Here are the known issues. All of which affect every Ubuntu flavour. **You may not be able to enter your pass phrase if you use full disk encryption. LP: #1386005**


1

Using a Logitech wireless? The 3.19 kernel used in 15.04 doesn't have built in support anymore. Find a wired keyboard and log in. Edit /etc/initramfs-tools/modules and add hid-logitech-hidpp on a new line. Save and exit. From the console run sudo update-initramfs -u reboot.


0

Easy as pie. Simply go to the .ssh folder in your home and add the file config nano /home/${USER}/.ssh/config and add the following lines e.g. Host duck-a-rub HostName mail.man.com OR <IP-Address> User rubberduck Port 223 IdentityFile /full/path/to/keys/rubberduck_id_dsa save the file and give it a try. ssh duck-a-rub HTH, s1mmel


0

I tried this but cannot rewrap passphrase as it does not even recognize my (correct) old passphrase. I launched another question on StackExchange here.


1

You should have the tool cryptsetup already installed. To show details of the current cipher you can run the following command: sudo cryptsetup status sda5_crypt Replacing sda5_crypt with the name of your encrypted volume. You should see an output similar to this: type: LUKS1 cipher: aes-xts-plain64 keysize: 512 bits device: /dev/sda5 ...


0

I was finally able to decrypt my home folder and recover my data. These are the steps I followed: Renamed my old home folder from /home/$USER to /home/$USER_old Created a new home folder using mkhomedir_helper command Logged in GUI mode (before I was not able to log in because my home folder was not getting decrypted) Checked if I can unwrap my old ...


1

That feature isn't supported by Deja Dup. It IS supported by the underlying duplicity command line tool though. See duplicity's man page for help using it.


1

You can try using ecryptfs-recover-private. Boot into your live CD, preferably an Ubuntu one of a newer version Mount the partition containing your home directory (either your root partition, or your /home partition if you have one) In your terminal, navigate to the directory containing your home directory (should be something like ...


1

Its not really a problem of whether you can do it, it is a problem of how far you are willing to compromise your encryption. From any system you can mount any encrypted partition, as you have found. But to do this you must have credentials (the password or key to decrypt it). If you want a system to be able to automatically mount something that is encrypted ...


1

Easy: Remove the following lines from fstab: # #Bind mounts for AeroFS to sync outside it's folder: # /home/user/Desktop /home/user/AeroFS/Desktop none bind 0 0 /home/user/Documents /home/user/AeroFS/Documents none bind 0 0 /home/user/Music /home/user/AeroFS/Music none bind 0 0 /home/user/Pictures ...


1

Test this: Switch on your computer. Press and hold the Shift key. In the Grub menu select the line which starts with ---- Advanced options. Select the line ending with --- recovery mode. Your PC should display a menu with a number of options, select --- Drop to root shell prompt. In a terminal run: mount -o remount,rw / mount --all mount -t ecryptfs ...


0

Short general answer You can't. The goal of encryption is to make valid data look like gibberish, i. e. as indistinguishable from random data as possible. Long answer fitting most cases On the other hand, most useful data (e. g. file systems) is structured and non-random. With that in mind you can: Try to match it against known patterns like well-known ...


1

One alternative is to specify another location for the AuthorizedKeysFile (default ~/.ssh/authorized_keys) which is what SSH checks to pass your keys. You can do this by editing /etc/ssh/sshd_config on the server and setting: AuthorizedKeysFile /some/path/authorized_keys According to man 5 sshd_config: AuthorizedKeysFile Specifies the file that ...


2

TrueCrypt. There is no good reason not to use it. It works great and if you consider what secret agencies of the US can force people to do, the fact that it is discontinued by its original developer(s) is actually a good thing. There are endeavors to find any kind of security issues and there haven't been found any as of yet.


0

First of all, if I remember correctly you have to check a box to install Ubuntu with an encrypted home directory, but I could be wrong. It certainly looks like it's encrypted. Secondly, the bad news: if you encrypted the home directory at boot, it doesn't use your account password, but a separate pass phrase. After you first booted a pop up comes up with ...


0

Solved it with ecryptfs-rewrap-passphrase /home/.ecryptfs/my_user/.ecryptfs/wrapped-passphrase The problem was that when I tried rewrapping the passphrase I was trying to set a passphrase different than my account password. It worked when I set it the same as my account password.



Top 50 recent answers are included