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3

They are completely separate and other then "encryption" they have nothing in common. LUKS / LVM encrypts everything but /boot. ecrypts or an encrypted /home encrytps /home/your_user name With LUKS, everything is decrypted when you boot, /swap, /home, / , etc. You can of course configure this differently , but this is how the defaults work. With ecrypts, ...


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Yes, it does look as if encfs is no longer maintained. It is in Ubuntu 14.04 because it still is in Debian wheezy. It has been removed from Debian jessie, so should be gone from future versions of Ubuntu. Like the OP in this Debian bug report, I do not have the competence to judge this, but I recommend that you do not use it unless you have to, given the ...


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Truecrypt is (was?) probably the most well known cross platform, open source encryption tool, but unfortunately the project was mysteriously shut down by its anonymous developers just a few months ago, when the website was replaced with a message stating that it's "no longer safe." However, the general consensus in the security community seems to be that ...


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I might be resurrecting the dead, but I guess a late answer is better than no answer. The way ecryptfs works is that the actual files are encrypted with a proper key, however this key is then stored encrypted by your user password in a file 'wrapped-passphrase' in the ~/.ecryptfs directory. Although I'm no crypto expert, this does seem to suggest that your ...


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The problem is that you ran GnuPG as root at some time, and it created your keyring files with root being the owner: -rw------- 1 root root 334311 Sep 13 22:17 pubring.gpg -rw------- 1 root root 334311 Sep 13 22:17 pubring.gpg~ -rw------- 1 root root 7645 Sep 13 22:17 secring.gpg Run sudo chown -r bill:bill /home/bill/.gnupg (user folder guessed from ...


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You can recover your encrypted data by issuing the following command: sudo ecryptfs-recover-private You will see an output such as this: INFO: Searching for encrypted private directories (this might take a while)... INFO: Found [/home/.ecryptfs/USERNAME/.Private]. Try to recover this directory? [Y/n]: Hit enter, and follow the steps... INFO: Found ...


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I had the same issue and I succeed to solved it with the existed comments, thanks guys :). Here the following steps I followed, my home is encrypted and I have a dedicated swap partition. Enable root account sudo passwd root Log on via CLI with the root account and format swap partition sudo mkswap /dev/sdX Check the swap partition UUID sudo blkid ...


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I was having the same exact problem in Ubuntu 14.04 and came across this thread; this link that mutant provided worked well for me. I used the /dev/disk/by-id reference rather than the /dev/sdXY, as that reference is not always pointing to the same physical partition. My /etc/crypttab ended up like: cryptswap1 /dev/disk/by-id/wwn-0x500...-part6 ...


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GPG, the Gnu Privacy Guard, is available for Linux, Windows and Android (and others). You'll lose some comfort though, as you would first have to decrypt manually and then open the desired file(s)...


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Easiest thing to do, if you can some how plug in your new hard drive at the same time the old one is plugged in: 1) Boot into a liveCD or liveUSB of a linux distro (any distro!) 2) Identify which /dev/sdX each one is (your 256 is likely /dev/sdb and the 512 will be /dev/sdX where x can be b, c, d...) Check out gparted and see what you see on the top right ...


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The project lives, and is working on a 2.0 revision: https://github.com/vgough/encfs "EncFS has been dormant for a while. I've started cleaning up in order to try and provide a better base for a version 2, but whether EncFS flowers again depends upon community interest. In order to make it easier for anyone to contribute, it is moving a new home on Github. ...



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