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7

The act of encrypting also implies you have to abide by the rules set for encrypting. One of those rules is: NO automatic login. Your password is required to unwrap the mount pass phrase used to decrypt your home. If you want automatic login: remove the encryption. I don't see the "Asked on Login" option, so this menu has presumably changed since 13.04. ...


3

Yes, it will. If your SSD is hardware encrypted, the new laptop you're moving it will need to support SED, which, in your case, is no problem, since you will be putting it into another laptop of the same make / model. If you only have home directory encryption (Set up with "Encrypt my home folder" during installation), or another form of software-only ...


3

Encrypt them (perhaps just use the standard utility to zip them up and use a password, or even several layers) and then place them somewhere where you know where they are but others would not, if you want to keep them really hidden then give them names that don't make them look out of the ordinary, you could also put a . infront of each in the filename to ...


2

You may install keepassx. That's exactly what it does. It encrypts and stores all kinds of passwords and you can also use keyfiles for extra protection. sudo apt-get install keepassx


2

After seeing the curious post I decided to do a little research. It appears that in any windowing system (e.g. X windows, etc) you have a common space that holds the contents of the clipboard. As such, it is available to any program that can pull from the clipboard. As such, I would expect the clipboard to be just as insecure as any other input device with ...


1

I know that the portion after pub ABCDE/ is the public key and the portion after sec ABCDE/ is the private key. You're mistaking the algorithm identification field with the key ID. sec ABCDE/XXXXXXXL 2016-06-09 uid My Name (comment) <example@email.com> sub ABCDE/XXXXXXXM 2016-06-09 sub ABCDE/XXXXXXXN 2016-06-10 The field you'...


1

If you can see the files, you can change the last step. Press Alt-F2 and type gksu nautilus + Enter. This will launch Nautilus with root rights and you should be able to do whatever you want with the files. I am not 100% sure gksu exists on the Live CD but if it doesn't, go ahead and install it: sudo apt-get install gksu. It will disappear after the next ...



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