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4

My apologies for posting this as an answer, but comments would not get the attention this needs. It is my considered opinion, that your drive is in imminent danger of failing. Please make a full system backup right now. If you don't know how to make a system backup, please refer to this question. You're user type 4. If you need any further help on making ...


3

I'm going to say overkill. You incur a penalty in performance for the decryption twice, while only gaining a marginal increase in security. If an adversary is able to bypass the full disk encryption in some way, by stealing the keys from memory, using a keylogger or just beating it out of you with a wrench. Then breaking any secondary encryption is only ...


3

First MD5 is a hash function that reads the whole file/string/input data and generates a defaultly 128-bit long hex-formatted hash. That hash is always the same when the file or the given string is the same. With the utillity md5pass you do exactly the same, but the hash gets "salted". In cryptography, a "salt" is random data that is used as an additional ...


2

When you login to Ubuntu your disks are automaticly decrypted. So when you copy files on external storage they are decrypted.


2

shred is well suited to the task. Personally I would actually want to WRITE to the blocks rather than wrap the whole thing in encryption. Example, http://serverfault.com/questions/6440/is-there-an-alternative-to-dev-urandom Zap the disk with the openssl random data generator and then shred it. If you're really that concerned with the data that might be ...


2

Offhand, I'm thinking that if your using the entire device (/dev/sdb) and your LUKS header is at the start of the drive, and if some other tool or OS "helpfully" decides that your disk is unformatted with no MBR or GPT, if it were to overwrite your LUKS header that would be bad. If you were using a partition for LUKS then at least a new MBR or GPT wouldn't ...


2

I would use encfs which is available for linux, osx and windows. Advantage is that you can also use it with cloud storage since encfs encrypts on filesystem level and therefore the changes only affect the files changed not a partition as a whole. Edit, additional info On Linux it's as easy as encfs ~/Dropbox/encrypted ~/Private I presume it's similar ...


1

The files are files from your old encrypted home directory. If you mount the directory containing those encrypted files without encryption enabled or with a different key/passphrase they will fail decryption and show up as ECRYPTFS_FNEK_ENCRYPTED.... To fix that you have to mount the directory with the proper key/passphrase that was originally used to ...


1

I had the same problem and I found a solution that worked for me in this post. Basically: Open fstab: sudo gedit /etc/fstab Change this line: /dev/mapper/cryptswap1 none swap sw 0 0 to this: /dev/mapper/cryptswap1 none swap sw,noauto 0 0 Then go to sudo gedit /etc/rc.local and immediately before exit 0 add these two lines: sleep 5 swapon ...


1

(Assuming FDE is Ubuntu disk encryption, since INTEL SSDSC2BW240A3 has build-in encryption feature.) Looks like common SSD behavior with Ubuntu, not FDE connected. Common current FDEs, including cryptsetupt/LUKS which is default Ubuntu disk encryption mechanism, use transparent approach (don't add additional writes) and so harmless to SSD. But ...


1

that's indeed quite disturbing. May be you can double check from the command line with: cryptsetup luksDump /dev/mmcblk0p1 It should spit out something like LUKS header information for /dev/mmcblk0p1 Version: 1 Cipher name: aes Cipher mode: xts-plain64 Hash spec: sha1 Payload offset: 4096 MK bits: 256 MK digest: 50 21 48 ...


1

You must decide which directory with enough space to create the swap file, you suppose is in /, (/swapfile). Open a terminal,Press Ctrl+Alt+T Run it for 2 Gb (bs=2048): sudo -i dd if=/dev/zero of=/swapfile bs=2048 count=256k mkswap /swapfile swapon /swapfile Now You can ensure that the swap is permanent by adding it to the fstab file. Continue running ...


1

According to, http://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Introduction-to-Self-Encrypting-Drives-SED-557/ In the case of SEDs, the main downside is that once the drive has been unlocked, it remains so until the power to the drive has been cut. In other words, if you simply reboot the computer or put it into sleep, the drive remains unlocked. It is not ...


1

Sure it increases security, as long as you are using different passphrases for each one. And just in case one method is found to be flawed (could happen, see shellshock) or you wrote the passphrase on the case or something, there's a "backup" encryption.


1

the short answer is that ecryptfs is a filesystem encryption and only encrypts files not partitions, so it should be safe to resize the partition, but make a backup first! I'm flagging this as a duplicate, because this question has been asked before.



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