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3

I use two scripts for using my notebook-monitor or an external monitor. Maybe you can use them as a starting point. Note: My notebook has a nvidia graphic card, so i have to use disper instead of xrandr. Script to switch to the external monitor and set gnome-panel to monitor 1: #!/bin/sh disper --displays=auto -e lines=`disper -l|wc -l` ...


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The steps that (eventually) worked for me on 11.10 (Oneiric) with a 1680x1050 22" and 1024x1280 19" (counter-clockwise ;)): [Skip to important/troublesome steps in bold] Install the "ATI/AMD proprietary FGLRX graphics driver" (the "post-release updates" version failed for me) Reboot and see the horrible mirrorring at low res Use amdcccle(adminstrative) ...


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Your problem is that you have 2 video cards: the GeForce G105M and the intel Integrated one. It's called "Nvidia Hybrid Graphics" and it's a nightmare under Linux. Your only solution is to disable one of the GPU and then install the correct driver for the other one. If you disable the nVidia GPU (my suggestion), you will have better battery life and it will ...


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I can not give you step-by-step instructions, but the magic words you're looking for is "multiseat linux" - if you search internet you'll find quite a few tutorials which describe how to configure a system to work in multi-seat mode. A quick search returned this: Build a Six-Headed, Six-User Linux System Here's a wiki page from Ubuntu documentation: ...


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Just curious, did you open Nvidia as Root? sudo nvidia-settings if not, changes CAN'T be saved, as you need to be in the utility as root.


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I've found a solution writing a script that adapts the resolution each time I login. To make my life easier I had swapped monitors with the one I hook to my other laptop at my coworking space (that one detects the new monitor in both VGA and HDMI). First I searched for my monitor's specifications using Google to figure out the optimal resolution, using ...


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This might not really be the answer that you are looking for, but since I can't comment (weird restrictions :| ), here goes: A solution to your problem could be that you sync your userdata between the two browsers. I know that at least Opera (Link), Firefox and Chrome (both Sync) offer it. You connect your user data to an email adress and it is synced ...


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Following configuration has been working for me with two Dell U2312HM, back when I was using Nvidia TwinView, but don't just do copy & paste. Answer my questions first in the comment above, so we can find out what fits and works best for your setup. # nvidia-settings: X configuration file generated by nvidia-settings # nvidia-settings: version 1.0 ...


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Probably a silly question, but are you running amdcccle as root? If you're already doing that, maybe I can still help. Here's what I've got: Graphics card: AMD Radeon HD 6670 (vendor: ATI Technologies Inc) OS: up-to-date Ubuntu 11.10 I'm using the ATI proprietary driver(s) right now. The open source drivers were working for a while, but my desktop broke ...


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well, just for reference, this has helped: sudo apt-get purge nvidia-common It seems there was some sort of clash between nouvaeu and nvidia proprietary driver.


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Not so much an answer as a quick workaround. By switching to a tty and back, X seems to reinitialise cleanly. That is Ctrl+Alt+F1-6 followed by a Ctrl+Alt+F7. Not a cure, but a very quick remedy.


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I was not able to find the cause, but I solved the issue by setting the "Launcher placement" to "laptop" under "display settings".


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This exact same thing is happening to me on Ubuntu 12.10, every time I close my laptop. One work around is to install CompizConfig and Enable Window Management -> Put and configure a keyboard shortcut for Put to Next Output. That way as soon as you open your laptop you can move the window back to its original position. This will also re-size the window from ...


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When the screen locks, it really has no reason to display on both screens although I can see why you would want the second screen to display something. The lock screen function and login screen are programmed separately, so they will behave differently. The only thing you can do is go to Launchpad.net and find Ubuntu. Then, report this as a bug/idea. ...


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Someone may wish to embellish this answer but I hope its useful as a starting point and might involve a bit of learning. Your panel settings are stored somewhere in your GNOME settings in your /home/user/ directory. Probably .gconf/ or .gnome2/, you can see these directories by opening a terminal and typing ls -a or just by pressing ctrl+h in nautilus ...


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I'd personally recommend nvidia cards for their Twinview but you're extremely limited in what you can buy for AGP. The 6800 GT is probably the best card you can get fulfilling your requirements. Helpfully it's also supported by the current driver. I can't say how long it'll be until Nvidia stops supporting it but it's probably quite soon. Just to make ...


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So I resolved the issue by upgrading xorg using the xorg-edgers ppa. What are PPAs and how do I use them?


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Did you see this website and the example xorg.conf The important part to checkout is Section "ServerLayout" at the bottom of the file.


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Do you have some way of controlling the computer now? Can you SSH in? Last resort: Pull the disk out, stick it in another computer and that will let you edit files. Assuming you can get access to things, edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf as root (eg sudoedit /etc/X11/xorg.conf if you're sshed into or are on your computer). You want to look at the screen section. ...


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It's not possible, and I see a problem with the menus if it's done that way. Anyway, I don't expect that showing the panel in two monitors is consuming much more resources than displaying it only in one. So it makes little sense to remove it for performance reasons.


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Follow instructions here to update to Xfce 4.12., which will provide a new minimal display settings window, and options for dual monitor, which were not present in Xfce display manager in older versions.


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So I finally got it to work by implementing an xrandr script in the startup procedure as described here. My code in the script looks like that: #!/bin/sh xrandr --output DVI-0 --primary --mode 1920x1200 xrandr --output DVI-1 --mode 1280x1024 --pos 1920x37 I would still be glad if someone were to point out in which module the bug resides so I can file a ...


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Based on my own experience with 12.04, performance seems to degrade on multi-display desktop, regardless of your refresh rates or any other display settings for that matter. Though using single or single display desktop (multi-display desktop, one workspace for each display) will maintain normal FPS during video playback or rendering. Because you mentioned ...


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After trying many things I found out that there is a checkbox on the tab defaults which says "Apply Display Correction". On one hand, I feel silly that I didn't notice this before; on the other hand, the system layout is, at the least, not intuitive. Anyway, I'm happy that I can finally calibrate my displays again!



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