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This is a disaster for me but anyway. Ubuntu used to be user friendly during installation I used dual boot many times a few years back however things have changed a lot. the commands above did not work for me. I think I somehow made a wrong choice and installed over windows even though I created a partition. There were 2 options on where to install I chose ...


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Macs normally come with EFI System Partitions (ESPs) of about 100 MiB, which is plenty big enough for most purposes. (I recommend making them bigger for reasons related to EFI driver bugs, but that's not an issue here.) If you're seeing just ~6 MiB of free space on your ESP (with a mount point of /boot/efi), then something is wrong. I recommend you discover ...


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Given your comment, I suspect you may have something left over on your EFI System Partition (ESP). Mount it and, if Ubuntu is no longer installed, delete the EFI/ubuntu directory tree. You may also need to delete EFI/BOOT -- but it may hold Windows files, so that could help or make things worse. You can mount the ESP in Windows by opening an Administrator ...


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There are two ways you can go about this. The legacy method will have you boot from one drive and choose which OS you want to boot. Boot control then transfers to the appropriate HDD. In this scenario GRUB is installed to the MBR of the boot drive. This could be your Windows or Linux drive. You could also install GRUB to both drives just in case the first ...


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My situation: new notebook ASUS UX303UB with preinstalled Windows 10 Home and 250 GB SSDorChip My desired state: One partition with Windows 10, one partition with Linux destribution (Ubuntu 14.04.3), one partition for personal data files. I have in "BIOS": Boot -> Fast boot = Dsiabled and Security -> Secure boot menu -> Secure boot control = Disabled I have ...


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The OSes, Windows and Ubuntu runs independent of each other. The difference after installing Ubuntu is the boot manager. The boot manage will load the OS, and from there it's up to the configuration of the OS, as to how it behaves. Windows does not poll the Ubuntu partition while it's running because Windows can't read the Ubuntu file system. While ...


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Saddly, I've read a tutorial on how to fix this issues on some other page, and the tutorial messed my partition, which deleted all my information :(. So, now that the damage was done, I've "fixed" my hard drive formatting it again and creating the partitions from scratch. Thanks for your help :)


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If you want to replace Windows 10 with Ubuntu you're going to have to make a back up of all documents you want to keep. After installing Ubuntu you can then copy the documents to your Ubuntu install. The reason why the USB pen isn't bootable might be because the Ubuntu ISO hasn't been burned correctly onto the USB pen. A search for "windows burn iso" should ...


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Try to change grub.cfg for Windows 7. Boot your system to the GRUB menu. Select (highlight) the GRUB boot menu entry Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda3) Press e to edit the GRUB boot commands for Windows 7. Your current boot command should look like: insmod part_msdos insmod ntfs set root='hd0,msdos3' if [ x$feature_platform_search_hint = xy ]; then ...


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I will recommend doing boot-repair sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair You can get more information from here: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair "Active operating system was windows 7, with pre-installed windows 8 on it (but not activated)." What ...


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Does you have windows option in boot menu. Try to repair the boot. First log into ubuntu and execute these commands in commandline: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair type boot-repair in terminal or search in Dash. Run boot-repair by clicking on it. select ...


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Although it is not a linux-based solution, you can (totaly GUI): Install Ubuntu Install Windows Install EasyBCD in Windows and set the bootloader default boot in Ubuntu using Windows enviroment (You could skip this and let BCD handle your systams boot, I wouldn't) Reboot in Ubundu and install Grub in MBR, if not in command line use Grub Customizer. ps: ...


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This is defiantly possible! You have to have a spare partition or drive for Windows to install on in the first place. The tricky part is that Windows as you stated does not "like" to be installed alongside Ubuntu. The problem is that when installing Windows aside a Ubuntu system it will override Grub with the Windows boot loader, which makes Ubuntu ...


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Okay. I fixed it. I'll explain for anyone that might ever come across this. On the GParted screenshot you see /dev/sdb/ extended has a key/lock infront of it. When I clicked info it said the following: Status: Busy (At least one logical partition is mounted) Alright. It was because I was booted into my Ubuntu. I burned GParted on a Live CD and booted that. ...


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I guess you have installed ubuntu in the Wrong partition(which is C: drive). To confirm: Boot your ubuntu os and search for directory which have folders below.(perflog, Program files, Users, Windows) If no, you need to install windows Operating system again. if yes, start your ubuntu os and follow this ...


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Do you have the recovery disk(USB) for Windows 10? I will suggest do a fresh install of both the O/S. First recover the system and install(recover) Windows 10. Then create partitions for Ubuntu from Windows only(using disk management tool). Make sure secure boot is completed disabled in BIOS. If windows 10 is installed in EFI mode, make sure that Ubutnu is ...


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What you have tried to do will not work. Windows 10 is installed in UEFI (GPT) mode. You have to install Ubuntu in EFI mode as well. It is not possible to do this with Ubuntu in 32 bit. Install the recommended 64 bit edition of Ubuntu.


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To access files on Windows, you can mount your Windows partition with read-only privilege. eg. sudo mkdir /media/windows sudo mount -t ntfs-3g -o ro /dev/sda3 /media/windows This works for me on my Windows 10 & Ubuntu 15.10 dual booting system. To enter into Windows 10, you should check your boot sequences in bios settings by selecting Windows UEFI ...


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The problem, as it says, that there's no device drivers found. The GNU/Linux (e.g. Ubuntu) installation disc works fine because by default there's a bunch of drivers. This is one of differences between how GNU/Linux distros and Windows are shipped. For more obvious example, imagine you just installed Windows and Ubuntu. If you would look for you GPU device ...


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do sudo fdisk -l edit your question to include the output :)


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Have you tried this, and enter bios and set to legacy boot, and then from boot enter command line, and enter this: test hd1 badram hd1 dump hd1 and then use set secondary=hd1 and it might work fine this way.


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I have had Manjaro linux 15.12 XFCE (kernel 4.1) running on my gt72s for 2 months now nearly perfectly. I get freezing if I try to boot with linux kernel 4.3 or 4.4 (killer wifi network driver support added from 4.3~) But I don't need wifi currently so I can wait it out. I suggest you try Manjaro, super fast and beautiful distro and this machine is a beast ...


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I'm running Ubuntu 14'04 and Windows 10 using two hard drives. Isolate the drives when loading each hard drive. To select either program use the bios program when you boot up.


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Not sure what computer brand you are using, but instead of hitting F12 for boot options try using F2 (or what ever option gets you into CMOS) and right arrow over to the "boot" tab. Here you can choose which drive to boot from (the Linux drive or the Windows Drive). Select the drive you want to boot from, hit F10 to save changes and reboot. Also try ...


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The way you have done your booting was absolutely wrong. Try installing grub on your hard-drive. Use a live ubuntu usb to solve the problems of booting. If you want to have a fresh start so that u don't have to face any problems in future. i.e., safest way to install operating systems. here was a good video explaining how to boot in safest way. click ...


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I found out eventually. Edit /boot/grub/grub.cfg Find ### BEGIN /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober ### menuentry 'Windows 10 (loader) (on /dev/sdXX)' After chainloader +1 Write ntldr /bootmgr It did the trick and fixes the shit. Thanks all for your hints.


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I solved the problem by reinstalling windows 10 MBR on the the first hard drive using a usb drive. The I installed grub on the second hard drive (where Ubuntu is) and I put it as first in the boot order. Grub is now able to recognize the window partition and everything works fine.


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Never mind. Seems as if it was the Universal-USB-Installer's fault. Tried Unetbootin and it works now.


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WUBI is deprecated even on BIOS-based computers and is 100% useless on a dual-boot with an EFI-mode Windows installation, so don't waste any more time on it. When doing a dual-boot installation in EFI mode, you should NOT enable the Compatibility Support Module (CSM; aka "legacy boot support" or a similar phrase). Doing so is much more likely to create ...


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I strongly suspect, but do not know for certain, that you've installed Ubuntu in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, and that you've got an EFI/UEFI-mode Windows installation. Such dual-mode installations always complicate matters, and should be avoided. Unfortunately, avoiding them takes some general EFI know-how that is, as yet, not as common as it needs to be. Another ...


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Launch the Disks program from the launcher. The "Volumes" section will show you all the disks in your system. Select your 3Tb HDD. In the bar at the bottom of the Volumes diagram, click the gear wheels icon to bring up the settings for that disk. Click on Edit Mount Options Turn on the Auto Mount option, and make sure the 'show in user interface' ...


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I have something similar. I never see grub. However, if I get the BIOS boot menu, I can choose either Windows or Linux. You may also need to disable safeboot in the BIOS. When your machine first comes on it should tell you which key to press to get BIOS settings. F10, F12, del or something.


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Sometimes, this behavior arises when windows is not properly shutdown or you might have windows hibernated. In this case if you boot ubuntu it will not mount that drive. Hope this helps.


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the error oxc000007b is because you have to format your usb with fat32. then use universal usb installer to make a bootable ubuntu usb and as you implied that you are not happy with win 10 and you missing the simple bios days then you should delete win 10 and go open source as i did. I like the freeodm of doing anything on linux. but before this transfer ...


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There is a section of your HHD that is the boot area. The information in there will dictate the boot steps. If you installed Ubuntu along with Windows then you need to install GRUB from ubuntu to the boot manager. That will handle our chioce of win or ubuntu. You will need to boot the live disk and either fully reinstall or install grub from there. Open a ...


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So it turns out I'm a complete rookie. I decided to start over as I hadn't been able to find a fix by troubleshooting mid-process. I finally saw something I'd been missing: I hadn't gone through the process of making the flash drive into a startup disk. I'd only ever loaded an OS onto a blank drive before so I had no idea that process was necessary when ...


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for sure that is not a problem of available space. Seems that for some reason your installation image is not correct. The message on the bottom says, that installer cannot find /dev/sdc device containing installation image. You mentioned about 2 SDDs in RAID mode. My guess is following: hardware RAID under windows is recognized as single drive (which is ...


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This is really a Windows question. You need to learn how to delete the linux partition in Windows and potentially reinstall the bootloader if the linux one was installed over it. You'll then also probably want to expand your Windows partition to reclaim the space the linux partition took.


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I've had problems with initially installing Ubuntu on my Toshiba, but it is possible. Try disabling the secure boot option in your BIOS, and if that doesn't work try switching to CSM boot mode, that should work.


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After reading the comments it seems to me that there is a disconnect in understanding. Follow the steps below which should result in a clean install. Create your bootable USB using Rufus Reboot the pc, and boot the USB drive Ensure that you have a wired internet connection Uncheck third party apps and software (as this slows down the install greatly) Allow ...


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Unfortunately there is not a way to do this, that I have found. I have installed many, many versions of Ubuntu on various computers. You will need a CD, or USB to do this. You cannot start an install of an OS while working in an OS due to the r/w process. You will have to boot from an external device like CD or USB. If you get your hands on a USB stick I ...


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Finally I was lucky. After some trials and boot-repairs (e.g like the description in Recovering GRUB after installing Windows 7?) I found out that the problem was caused by the version of the kernel. On grub menu I selected advanced options where there was the choice between the 3.19.0-25-generic version which did not work (and was the same as the default ...


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The problem in your case is that, in the image shown above your 289.09GB HDD is of MBR (Master Boot record)partition style which only supports up to 4 primary partitions (i.e blue partitions) . If you want more than 4 partitions then you have to create an extended partition such that the total HDD has 3 primary and 1 extended partition. Then from that ...


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I had the same trouble with an NVMe disk. That technology is quite recent and the old version of GParted in Ubuntu repo couldn't see my SSD. I resolved creating a GParted live USB with the latest version of the software.


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Do you know on which hard drive your /boot partition is ? It must be your primary boot devices set in BIOS. Then under Ubuntu try to do sudo update-grub It will detect all your bootable devices and create the grub menu that will allow you to choose your OS during boot.


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Everyone's info was helpful for me but in the end I still couldn't accomplish changing the grub default and then restarting in one click. After tinkering away for 2 hours I discover this program which is the exact same thing we're all trying to build and in 5 minutes I'm rebooting into windows. Thanks everyone here's the cheater link for those that also give ...


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A couple different problems and solutions here. Problems with Windows holding on to the cache and nvme drive were solved by disabling fast startup on Windows per recommendation 3 here. Fixed booting problem caused by Nouveau and nvidia by pressing e during the grub menu and adding nomodeset to the end of the Linux line. System boots properly now and as ...


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It depends on how you boot the installer. If you boot it in EFI/UEFI mode, it should go on the EFI System Partition (ESP). If you boot it in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode, it will probably go to the MBR of /dev/sda, but might conceivably go to the MBR of /dev/sdb. Either way, that's probably not what you want.... Backing up, in a dual-boot scenario, it's important ...


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Try pressing F9 during the start of your computer, if you're using an HP computer.


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Have you seen this wiki article: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RecoveringUbuntuAfterInstallingWindows When you install Windows it rewrites the MBR (Master Boot Record) with the Windows boot loader. Following the procedure under "The Graphical Way" should get your grub back ;-)



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