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Consider restructuring your question into steps. As you mentioned that you formatted all partitions, the reason why Grub cannot find the files required to proceed and you're getting the error. That said, if your aim is to install only Windows OS, then you need to boot from Windows Media(DVD/Usb drive) to boot into it and install it. What options do you see ...


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Yes you can install ubuntu on a different drive. but you need to know something before you proceed. new EFI systems these days (or UEFI) has Fastboot/General-optimization option. that makes the PC boot faster. but if you turn this ON and install ubuntu on a different drive, you will get the grub prompt saying "no such device" error. Reason is that ...


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It seems that your bios is configured to search boots with UEFI firmware boot. Windows8 is working because boots with it. It's possible that your Ubuntu doesn't install UEFI boot. Search at bios configuration "SECURE BOOT" option and disable it. Try then.


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This problem happens to me as well. The way you you fix this problem. First turn off secure boot and fast boot. and if that doesn’t work proceed to the following steps 1.boot from the Ubuntu disk. 2.Click try Ubuntu. 3.Get Boot repair 4. Run the recommended repair. If you need better more clear instructions ill give you the link to the help site ...


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Make a bootable USB-stick To create a bootable USB drive the tool that I advocate using is the Universal USB Installer from www.pendrivelinux.com. Partition Windows takes up the whole of the drive when it is first installed. In order to install Ubuntu you will need to make space for it. Press the "super key" (Windows key) on your keyboard and click the ...


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When Ubuntu is on a separate partition this is properly a Windows problem.


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Get a disk image of ubuntu (.iso file), and put it on a USB drive using win32diskimager or Unetbootin. Then boot the the USB drive and follow the instructions given. From there u can choose the amt. of space you want to give to each OS and also if you want some space for a swap


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Choose the option to install beside windows. It will give you the option of resizing windows partition if necessary. Also, you can open Disks or Gparted to see the list of partitions.


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You could try to disable the graphical grub spash. Edit /etc/default/grub (as root) and uncomment # GRUB_TERMINAL="console" (remove the #) after that, run sudo update-grub and see if it helped.


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this might helps you... BOOT-REPAIR helps alot . you can follow these steps sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair


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If you don't want Ubuntu to install on the external drive, you can choose to install it next to Windows. (The first option on the drive installation choice.) It should never touch the external drive if you do that. You can also install it on the external drive. You may have to choose to resize the partition. On a 1.5 TB external drive, with only a few ...


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As soon as you don't mount the partitions on your SSD, your Ubuntu system will not be able to apport any modification to them, so there's really no action you should take aside from avoiding to mount those partitions, but since the volume label of mountable partitions is always present on the left menu of any nautilus' window, if you fear you could ...


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I installed Windows 8.1 from the recovery thumb-drive. It installed: (Flags) ntfs RECOVERY 600 MiB hidden, diag unknown 128 MiB msftres ntfs Acer 120 GiB msftdata ntfs Push Button Reset 14.89 GiB hidden, diag Ubuntu reduced the Acer partition and created ...


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While it shouldn't format the drive unless you manually tell it to do so, if you are paranoid you can physically remove the external drive [after unmounting] when you are using Ubuntu.


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Solution: Want to keep all your data?: You should install Ubuntu on a separate partition. The most important thing is you should create a separate partition for Ubuntu manually, and you should select it while installing Ubuntu. First create a separate partition for Ubuntu while running Windows (like a partition with more than 10 GB). Also create a ...


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This post at glandium.org might be of interest: Debian EFI mode boot on a Macbook Pro, without rEFIt, as bigbadonk420 pointed out in a comment This worked for me.


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The procedure goes as follows: I installed a fresh copy of Windows 8.1 Pro by buying the app and making a bootable USB drive (see www.intowindows.com/how-to-install-windows-7vista-from-usb-drive-detailed-100-working-guide/). During the Windows setup process, I chose the custom type of installation, in which I was allowed to configure partitions. I erased ...


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first of all to help you better, we need to know more details about what media you're using to install Ubuntu. To install with a disc, the proper way to do it is to: Download Ubuntu from: Ubuntu Download Page After downloading Ubuntu then you need to burn an ISO image onto a DVD. You can do this from Windows 7 by right-click on downloaded file, then ...


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The problem is that apple has a proprietary boot manager. When you installed to your USB drive, Ubuntu tried to make some changers to the boot manager, which Apple happily ignored. Here's what you need to do: Boot into OSX. If you are working with an apple machine, DO NOT run this in anything but OSX. Download rEFInd. You can find it on sourceforge. ...


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okay...here is what has happened... you have created a non-efi capable linux installation medium (your linuxu usb disk) and a windows installation medium so that's why it doesn't work on EFI mode ON (apparently your linux usb-disk is corrupted, you need to recreate it. please keep reading) so you have two choices leave EFI mode OFF and install both OSes ...


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It does not answer your question but may solve your problem. You can develop C# under Ubuntu using mono http://www.mono-project.com/ (it's cross platform)


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First of all thanks to Carl for providing a hint - big hint. Actually my drives were not getting mounted even by using mount -r /dev/sda3 /mnt/boot-sav/sda3 but then I serached over net. I found out that my windows was not properly shutdown previous time, so the grub is showing trouble. So, I needed to manually mount the partitions & to achieve that I ...


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For me it Worked by doing sudo uninstall flgrx* then i did sudo install flgrx-updates then rebooted For me it was a problem after I added my AMD Radeon Graphic card. The problem I think is when I do updates that cause problems with the AMD driver I downloaded. I think that you shouldn't update your ubuntu often if you're going to play on it. ...


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I realized that the hard disk has gpt partitioning and not the mbr, so I'm allowed to create up to 128 primary partitions.


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Johnathon I will explain how I installed Ubuntu along side with Windows 7. Just like you I have also used an USB device to install the OS. When the it asks for where to install, i.e, if you want to install along side with windows or to completely wipe the hardrive and install it as new or something else, select the last option and proceed. On the next ...


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Just type the following command in a terminalCtrl+Alt+T sudo update-grub


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Windows 8 does not shut down properly by default. I suspect this is your problem. In your code I see: Failed to mount '/dev/sda3': Operation not permitted The NTFS partition is in an unsafe state. Please resume and shutdown Windows fully (no hibernation or fast restarting), or mount the volume read-only with the 'ro' mount option. mount /dev/sda3 : Error ...


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You have (at least) one bad block (LBA 5642528) that's causing repeated errors. You can try to: 1: backup your entire hard disk 2: reformat/repartition your disk using the LONG method to try and make it map out the bad block(s). This could take many hours to complete. 3: restore your hard disk or 1: replace the hard disk Cheers, Al


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You could partition your SSD and install the OS there. This will give you the quick startup time you desire. What sort of things do you plan to install on the Ubuntu partition? If you run out of space and have to start installing on the slower drive then your speed will be limited to that of the slower drive anyway.


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Have you set your boot load order in your BIOS to boot to your Ubuntu partition first? I have mine set that way and if I should ever want to boot into my Windows 8.1 partition I am given the option to do so before Ubuntu starts loading up.


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We should be able to fix this for you, but will require some additional troubleshooting: Set network back to DHCP Can you ping google ? (ping -c5 www.google.com in the terminal) What is the output of (ifconfig in the terminal) Let me know and we can continue the process from there.


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If you have two hard drives, then installing Windows on one and Ubuntu (or any other OS) on the other is the most convenient. most modern Windows PC's come with three partitions already installed - a recovery partition, the "System Reserved" partition, and finally your primary Windows partition. If only 3 Primary partitions are defined, create an extended ...


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When starting the live session, choose "try Ubuntu". Then open GParted via Dash. GParted is a way better partitioning program than the one in the installer. It will give you great visual display and if something doesn't work, it will give you useful information about what doesn't work. Please also notice that (if you have an HDD, so if you have an SSD, ...


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For that kind of setup, you don't need to do anything special. It's essentially just a normal desktop installation of Ubuntu, so at minimum all you need is one big partition, plus some swap space (usually in another partition). Unless you have any specific requirement that would require something else, I'd recommend just going with the default partitioning ...


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Sometimes I look at this notice from time to time when installing Ubuntu on different PC devices, just to be sure in case I forgot something. :) I think this is plenty enough about partitioning.


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This is where things start to become a matter of personal preference and recommendation. Unless you have special purpose for a dual boot system, I found switching back and forth tedious. But that is a matter of style and organisation. I use Virtualbox for those Windows only applications that don't cut Wine and avoid the reboot interruption. The Linux ...


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It would statistically be less safe to install onto two separate drives. If one drive fails you lose half of your data. Conversely, installing both OSs to one drive and keeping the (hypothetical?) second drive as a backup drive would give you a form of redundancy should one drive fail. As far as your system is concerned, it doesn't matter if you partition ...


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From a strict system point of view, it is exactly the same ... provided you correctly configure your partitions. Correctly configured partitions are perfectly safe to use and you will never inadvertantly erase date in one partition while working on another one - be they under same OS or not. If you configure them by hand hacking the Master Boot Record with ...


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In general, they should leave each other alone. If you do the install correctly (Windows first, then Linux, as a rule, because Linux is more 'considerate'). As far as I am aware, there is no additional risk involved in sharing a drive. Having said that, here are some gotchas to watch out for. 1) Windows will not be able to see the contents of your Linux ...


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It is safer to use 2 hard disks. during formatting it is easier to recognize the different hard disks. 1 will be named sda and the other sdb. Though the installer puts names next to bootable partitions it does help to find other partitions that belong to that specific OS (like a D: drive will be sda2 on sda where sda1 is the OS for Windows or db2 is a ...


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Short answer: It doesn't matter at all. Detailed answer: There is absolutely no risk with keeping two operating systems on the same disk device. You can mess with another system partition as long as the disk device with that partition is accesible, putting it on separate physical device doesn't make it safer (nor less safe) in any way.


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After seeing your error report I was wondering, since I had Ubuntu 14.04 alongside with Windows 8.1. But for dual booting I made legacy mode enabled so after 2/3 months my pc started facing problems. As this legacy setting should be disabled for Windows 8/8.1. So am using it in VM ware now. So I think if you are using licensed copy of windows then don't use ...


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Fully remove burg: sudo apt-get remove --purge burg burg-common burg-emu burg-pc burg-themes burg-themes-common Reinstall burg: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:n-muench/burg && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install burg burg-themes && sudo burg-install "(hd0)" && sudo update-burg && sudo burg-emu


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I faced somehow same problem on dualbooting... BOOT-REPAIR helps alot . you can follow these steps sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair


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You can boot Ubuntu only in UEFI because you have installed Ubuntu in UEFI mode while Your windows installation is in Legacy (Not EFI) Mode. To Avoid Such issues you need to Install Ubuntu in UEFI mode only if Windows is installed in UEFI mode or Ubuntu is the only operating system on your computer. If your windows is installed in Legacy mode, then you ...


0

I dont know if this will help but have you tryed using the disk to repair grub? I'm sorry if this sounds basic but this has helped me with a problem sorta similar


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If I were you, I'd: Take a full system backup Download and burn a DVD of 14.04.2 32 bit version as you seem to have a need for OpenOCD which doesn't seem to like 64-bit versions. boot and follow these instructions, at step 8 take "something else", delete the 200GB /dev/sda6 partition and create a 32GB / and 128 GB /home in èxt4 format. leave the rest ...


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windows boot manager won't recognize ubuntu and so only loads up windows, and did you turn off fast boot in windows?


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There should not be any issue loading from different disks (at least with grub2). Here is an easy tool you can use to edit grub https://launchpad.net/grub-customizer. Just add a new entity and choose your partition from the other disk



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