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I have now successfully installed ubuntu-14.04.4-desktop-amd64+mac.iso on a MacBookPro3,1 using a DVD. Trying a Live USB for Lubuntu 16.04, lubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64+mac.iso , Ubuntu 16.04 and for ubuntu-14.04.1-desktop-amd64+mac.iso, led to getting the same "Core temperature above threshold" message. I'm pessimistic about Ubuntu 16.04 with the "...


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In case of problems with logging in: it could be that purging deleted a needed file in /home/$USER/ or it changed permissions on a needed file. If the problems occur before login it is more than likely related to the video card driver. 1st thing to do is to go to a TTY (control alt f1). You can use apt-get to re-install ubuntu with: sudo apt-get install ...


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There will be a gear or icon either near the password field or in the status bar on the login screen. If it's an icon, it will have the Ubuntu logo in it (if Unity is your default DE). Click it to choose another DE before logging in.


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While you can do this, it may be more convenient to use chroot jails to hold your multiple installations of Ubuntu. This has a downside that you will need to use the same kernel for all of your installations, but the upside is that you can use them at the same time, without needing to reboot, and don't need to partition your disks for the individual ...


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I suggest you first install Ubuntu 14.04 and during installation make 3 partitions of 250gb ssd each disk formatted as ext4 and mount one partition as / , also format the other disk where you want to save data as /home . Then install Ubuntu 15.04 in the second partition of 250gb ssd and format it as ext4 and mount it as / and mount the other disk where you ...


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No problem. That is normal when you have 2 or more operating systems. Pretty simple. Assume you have an empty disk and boot into the installation and are at the partitioning setup. create 4 partitions. Ubuntu OS needs a root of about 25Gb that can include a /home/. 25Gb is more than enough if you keep your own data outside of the system (ie. out of / and ...


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The Windows drivers of your peripherals must be off for some reason. You should try pluging in a wired keyboard and mouse to log into your Windows account, and reach the Device Manager (Startup menu, type "Device Manager" it'll come up). Then look for a device that has a yellow exclamation mark on it, that might be the culprit. You can try repairing it, or ...


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I've found the answer. If it could come in handy to someone - the thing was to create EFI partition on the drive where the Windows was installed. It looks like after installing dual boot Ubuntu it moved that partition to the partition where GRUB and Ubuntu were installed and I had to bring it back home. It can pretty easily be done with diskpart utility, ...


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First check if Windows is still there (not erased by mistake). Boot into a Live Ubuntu and open GParted. Check partition map and look for ntfs partitions labeled msftdata, Windows, etc. If Windows is still there, insert the Win install disk and reboot into it (remove the Live Ubuntu medium while restarting the PC). Let the Wins install process begin and ...


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I’m not 100% certain about this but have you checked the BIOS to see if it will even try to boot from the existing SSD? I had a similar problem and had to change the boot order in the BIOS to convince the machine to start there and not even try the other boot options.


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First, a clarification: Your title says you upgraded to 16.04. Does this mean that an earlier Ubuntu had been installed and was booting correctly? If so, what version? This is important mainly to establish a baseline -- if Ubuntu was installed and booting, then we know that your computer is capable of booting it correctly, which rules out certain possible ...


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Easiest way is dd from terminal sudo dd if=location of Windows image of=/dev/sd# Replace # with your usb drive letter, do not enter the partition number, then press enter. MAKE SURE to unmount the usb prior to running dd. When it runs it will look like nothings happening, when it completes it will output how much data was written. Reboot and boot from the ...


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When you install MS Windows 10, it overwrites the Grub contents in MBR to its own. All your Windows and Linux OS files are intact and good. All you need to do here is to repair you GRUB files. I used boot-repair and it worked very well for me. If you want to fresh install everything, Install Windows 10 first and then install Ubuntu. It is possible from ...


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You can use Unetbootin and press F12 when the brand of your laptop appears on the screen when it boots. choose the usb storage device option.


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There is definitely a problem with the driver of the GTX 1070 on Ubuntu16.04. I install my GTX 1070 recently and it works perfect on win10. Then I setup a new Ubuntu16.04 as a second OS. At first, nothing went wrong during the setup process. But when the setup process finished, my desktop reboot into Ubuntu, the only thing I could see is the wallpaper ...


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Yes, it is possible and not very difficult. You can use a tool named Grub Customizer. To install that write: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer I'm using an answer from another part of askubuntu.com, more informations are provided there. Another way is to edit the grub2 ...


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Boot into Ubuntu and install an app called Grub Customizer. Open a Terminal window and type: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer (Press Enter after each line of text). Go to the main menu and start Grub Customizer. You can change default timing (those 10 secs) in the ...


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note: you will need to enable the universe repository Ubuntu has at least two OBD scan tool software packages available. You may be able to use one of these instead of the proprietary versions for your scanner. Open a terminal and execute the following commands to install the software: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install scantool obdgpslogger To ...


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make sure your game partition mounted, if not, mount it. open steam,Settings -> Downloads -> Content Libraries click STEAM LIBRARY FOLDERS,ADD LIBRARY FOLDER, then chose your TF2 folder, and click ok. If you chose your folder correctly, you can see your game in library.In order to not set library path everytime, you can change your partition to mount on ...


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I know it's a late revival, but hopefully you or someone else could find the answer you're looking for in this post. Guaranteed there are several more like it, too! You could boot up Windows and resize the data partition (which likely has a drive letter, like C:/) from there using disk management which, if memory serves, is done like this: Open up **...


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Regarding Android x86 6.0 The "EEEPC" assignment is only for ASUS EEEPCs, only use it if you have one, otherwise use android_x86, do not use generic_x86, you will get stuck at the boot animation and have to restart by using CTRL+F1 to access the terminal and issue reboot as the GUI will not get loaded. I know this because I spent several hours following bad, ...


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1.Boot the system with the ubuntu LiveCD. 2.open the Terminal and type sudo fdisk -l it will list number of partition look which Device contain partition of the type 'Linux' 3.Copy the Device name containing the partition For example after typing sudo fdisk -l It may list some device list like /dev/sda1/, /dev/sda2/,...


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Your initial problem is caused by El Capitan's new SIP/CSR feature, and is covered in the rEFInd documentation: http://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/sip.html The issue you describe in your comment of OS X booting from the Recovery HD partition is simply a matter of how Apple has chosen to name and use its partitions. Originally, Intel-based Macs placed their ...


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Have you gone into BIOS and set to boot from sdb drive or the 1TB drive? It is unusual for a newer system to only boot from first drive. Some much older BIOS, only boot from larger drives if system in first 137GB of drive. But make sure BIOS is set to AHCI, not IDE as that is the compatibility with the very old BIOS. Also turn off Windows 8's fast start or ...


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You can't "merge" partitions in Gparted. You can create, delete, or resize them. There was no need to format swap partition to ext4. You need to unmount your sda6 partition, delete sda5 and sda7, then expand the sda6. Consider leaving space for a swap partition and do not forget to add the new UUID of it to /etc/fstab. Note: After you move the start of ...


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When trying to resize internal disk linux partition ALWAYS use a LiveCD/USB, because all internal partitions must be unmounted (not blocked by the installed Ubuntu). You are doing that, which is very good. In GParted, right-click on the swap partition and choose swapoff. You can't resize or move it if it's not off (unused). Then move it out of the way, ...


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Depends entirely upon your bios and exactly what level of automation you desire. Suppose.... you have 2 HDD. You can install win on 1 HDD and ubuntu on 1 HDD. When booting, some bios will enable a function key that allows you to select which HDD is the boot HDD for your session. To test this, burn the ubuntu iso to a DVD or a usb stick, and try to boot from ...


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Yes you can choose the disk you want the installer to put Grub (bootloader). You just need to know how to set the partitioning yourself manually. When choosing how to install Ubuntu where the first option is to "Erase entire disk and install Ubuntu", the last option is "Something else" Choose that and you will be presented a GUI to handle partitioning. ...


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Get a copy of the Ultimate Boot Cd and boot your Pc with that. Launch "Parted Magic" from the menu When the boot completes, launch "TestDisk" from the menu. Follow the on-screen instructions to perform a quick scan of the drive in question. It's not quick but does usually work. It can scan for "lost" partitions by looking for markers common to the ...


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In Windows , the equivalent of GParted is the Disk Management app. Just remember that Win doesn't recognize any linux partition. It will graphically show that space as unknown format. Make sure you don't (re)format that space, as it may belong to Ubuntu. You can read Ubuntu partitions from Win by using DiskInternals Linux Reader app. You can (only) read, but ...


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You can also use GParted for this; it will give you a nice graphical display of all partitions; you can also modify / delete / create partitions using it, if you want. You can install it using the Software Center, or by typing sudo apt-get install gparted.


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Selectively unplugging one disk or another is a trick that some people used in the BIOS era, but EFI's design makes this approach less useful. This is particularly true for some computers, which may erase boot manager entries when they're found to no longer point to valid boot loaders, which of course will be true when you unplug a disk to which they point. ...


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I had exactly the same problem, but with OpenSuse. I had a dualboot and use easybcd. It loads the easybcd first then grub2. As suggested by other that grub could be missing so I load the windows and checked the boot entry of my linux. The location of partition was stlet to "auto locate at boot". After I changed it to the correct partition, problem was ...


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Only your host OS, Windows 10, requires EFI. You need to disable EFI on the VM. Afterwards treat the virtual machine as if EFI didn't exist, and read How to install Ubuntu on VirtualBox?.


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In Ubuntu, use the command sudo efibootmgr -v to see the UEFI boot order, and the command sudo efibootmgr -o XXXX,YYYY,... where the XXXX etc. are the numnbers on the boot items. Put Ubuntu's shimx64.efi bootloader first, or grubx64.efi if you are not using secure boot. On some machines you might need to set the UEFI Settings/BIOS supervisor ...


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Restoring Windows from one PC to another is ... a Windows problem, not Ubuntu problem. I guess it can be done. This site does not offer Windows support. Perhaps you should looks for such backup support on Windows sites. As for dual-boot, i always find easier to first install/restore Windows and then install Ubuntu. Less trouble, less problems (Ubuntu ...


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You're probably running into this bug: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/grub2/+bug/1091464 If so, two workarounds come to mind: You can disable Secure Boot, as described in more detail on this page of mine. This has the drawback that you'll lose the benefits of Secure Boot, which is designed to protect the computer against pre-boot malware. You ...


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I gave a similar answer a few minutes ago: Ubuntu installed, but GRUB not showing up Try out boot-repair-disk . This should fix your problem. And don't forget to save your files before you do that ;-)


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Have you already heard from boot-repair-disk: https://sourceforge.net/projects/boot-repair-cd/ This helped me a lot in the past. Simply generate a live usb stick using boot-repair-disk and boot from the stick. Of course you should have already saved all your files. Who knows what might happen... Edit: You can generate the live stick by using for example ...


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try sudo shutdown OR sudo reboot if you want to restart, in a terminal. if you cannot access terminal for some reason, then press Ctrl+Alt+F1 then login using your user name and password, then use sudo shutdown again. if you want to return back to your desktop screen press Ctrl+Alt+F7


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Lubuntu just uses LXDE. You can install that alongside whatever other desktop environments you have installed. Run sudo apt-get install lubuntu-desktop to install it. Log out, look for a gear icon or Budgie logo icon, press it and select LXDE or Lubuntu Desktop before logging back in. Fresh installs are usually better, but this is easier and takes less ...


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You need to install a bootloader. When you install Ubuntu over Windows sometimes the bootloader gets fudged. /dev/sda1 *or whatever sda(1,2,3,) you are using.


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Your problem is that the OS boot manager used by your computer is not set to grub, but to Windows. To fix this you need to get into the BIOS. In Windows, hit the Windows key and search up "change advanced startup options". Hit "enter". When the settings window appears, click "Restart now" below "advanced startup". When the screen appears, click "...


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If your problems are solved, look at the following link for additional ideas of what to try: Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows with UEFI


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Invoke the EFI menu (some function key at power-up, varies by machine) to select boot device/os and select Windows. Some machines may have a two stage menu, select hard disk first, then select Windows. Turn off the power-option "fast boot", and reboot to Ubuntu, then run sudo update-grub and you should see The Windows choice in grub. Note, you still ...


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It's a 'duel', all right! Insert the Windows install disk, reboot into it and choose Repair Windows option. Wait for it to finish, then reboot (and remove Windows installation disk). Now, you will only see Windows at startup. Boot into Windows and disable Fast Startup. Insert the Ubuntu installation disk and reboot (yes, again!). Boot into a Live ...


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A 2007 Mac Mini can't see a 64 bit cd/dvd so I took out the hard drive, cleaned up the inside of the mac, doubled the memory to 4 GB, installed 64 bit os in a USB box on a laptop, put HDD back in, couldn't see linux with refit. Next installed rFind in the Apple OS. Still no luck so moved partition over 10 GB and installed 2010 LTS 32 bit using CD and it was ...


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You have an UEFI motherboard with Ubuntu installed in UEFI mode. This is good. You have Windows installed in Legacy mode. This is bad. You can only boot one or the other, and it appears GRUB is installed to be used in UEFI mode. So you cannot boot a Legacy mode operating system from UEFI-mode GRUB IIRC. to get truly seamless dual-boot you'll need to ...


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I think you need to reinstall grub. follow this guide http://howtoubuntu.org/how-to-repair-restore-reinstall-grub-2-with-a-ubuntu-live-cd


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Windows Boot Manager bootmgr, manages the boot process. UEFI-based systems contain a firmware boot manager, Bootmgfw.efi. The BCD settings for the device and path elements in Windows Boot Manager indicate the firmware boot manager. The path element specifies the location of the Windows Boot Manager application on that volume. For UEFI systems, path ...



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