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chown cannot make changes to read-only filesystems.


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Your computer's bios will boot into whatever drive is on top of the priority list, put the drive you wish to boot from on top of the priority list. It's usually in (f2) but will depend upon your computer.


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You should allocate a separate partition for Ubuntu if you are planning to dual-boot with windows. If you choose so, make sure that you have moved all data from these partition(s) to some other partition because installing Ubuntu will format this partition and you will lose data if you put anything here. In addition, installing Ubuntu alongside windows like ...


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Your usb is probably corrupted, try re-burning the iso image to your usb. If that doesn't work I would re-download the iso. Also try using a different usb port to boot your machine.


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There will be no problem with GRUB being overwritten by any other bootloader when you install all operating systems in UEFI mode, which is the default since computers ship with Windows 8. Just install every operating system as intended. os-prober should be able to detect and include Windows and Mac OS in GRUB's menu, the answer to this question may be ...


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It sounds like Ubuntu boots successfully but cannot display anything. The reason is that you have a new graphic card that partially supported in Ubuntu 14.04. Ubuntu 14.04 supports nvidia 331 drivers by default while your card was first supported on nvidia 337+ drivers. Therefore, you have two options for fixing it: Installing Ubuntu 14.10 (Note: it's not ...


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It is possible to install Windows, and that should be pretty easy, but your computer isn't compatible with Mac OS. I checked online and the only result I found for your computer was one saying it only boots into Safe Mode, which obviously isn't helpful. For Windows, though, get the Windows 10 Technical Preview ISO from Saige's link and burn it to a CD or a ...


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You could only do this, to my knowledge, if you had bought a Mac with OS X already on it or obtained a copy of the OS illegally as I am pretty sure Apple has copyright laws against purchasing the OS off of the machine. Someone please correct me if I am mistaking about this. However yes, if you get a copy of any of these OSes and create either a bootable CD ...


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GRUB2 won't care. As long as the OS's in question and GRUB are installed and configured properly, GRUB will boot any OS configured from any drive it's on. There's no need for swapping cables or changing BIOS settings. You can use Grub Customizer to set default OS to boot, as well as other fun customizations. Grub Customizer is available via Daniel Richters' ...


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Open a terminal and type: sudo nano /etc/grub.d/40_custom Add the following line: menuentry "Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda1)" { insmod part_msdos insmod ntfs set root='(hd0,msdos1)' chainloader +1 } by appropriately modifying the location of windows 7 in your computer. Run sudo update-grub Note If you are not careful these operations can ...


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I think you wiped out your entire disk during setup or somehow you need secure boot or windows boot loader to load windows 8. If you didn't, and/or if secure boot or windows boot loader isn't involved, then try installing GParted. If the partition is still there, then try looking into a volume. If it isn't there, like i said, you may have wiped out the disk. ...


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Try updating the grub from the terminal. Open up Ubuntu and open the terminal. Then type sudo update-grub and check the output if windows is detected and reboot.


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If your Windows partition is still there (it probably is), SuperGrub2 will be able to find it and fix a GRUB option for Windows. After burning it and booting it, follow these instructions to detect all available OSs on your disk: http://www.supergrubdisk.org/wiki/SuperGRUB2Disk#Detect_any_OS


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Try opening up the boot disk selector menu. As far as I am aware, most computers have an option to select which disk is used at boot, for example with Lenovo laptops, the onekey recovery button gives you an option for boot menu. If you see Ubuntu and your hard disk both, select the hard disk. Depending on how your BIOS works, you may need to re-enable ...


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Boot into your Ubuntu LiveUSB/CD. In the setup, choose Something Else when prompted where to install Ubuntu. Next, double-click your partition meant for Ubuntu. For the Type option (or something similar), select the ext4 option from the dropdown. Select to format it and write / as the mount point. Click OK and then Next. Ubuntu will install to that ...


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If you're not using UEFI, the easiest way to do this would be to go into the BIOS boot menu and boot from the second hard drive. Complex problems sometimes have simple solutions, and this is one of those fortunate cases.


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Run the command sudo update-grub. If it still does not work try boot-repair. It will attempt to fix the problem, if it can't it will provide a link with all the information we need to further troubleshoot the issue.


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Update, looks like NTFS-3g got fstrim support in a patch from 2014-June. Ubuntu 15.04 worked fine with fstrim on a loopback-mounted NTFS filesystem image I wanted to make sparser. If 15.04's version of ntfs-3g includes that patch, it should work on mounted partitions, too. Other than that, ntfs-3g includes an ntfswipe command, which writes zeros over all ...


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Run sudo update-grub from the terminal.


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Edit the config file. gksudo gedit /etc/default/grub When the file opens, remove “#” before “GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0″ and set “GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true”. So it looks like: … GRUB_DEFAULT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT=0 GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT_QUIET=true GRUB_TIMEOUT=10 GRUB_DISTRIBUTOR=”`lsb_release -i -s 2> /dev/null || echo Debian`” ...


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I got the Dell XPS 13 (9343 model) from work, and first thing I did was wipe the disk, and install Ubuntu 14.04. I'm running the latest BIOS, A03. I did alot of tinkering to get the laptop booting. I discovered that the laptop will not work with UEFI booting. You need to disable secureboot, and boot the install media as a legacy device. Then perform a usual ...


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You can use Boot-Repair tool to set default OS in GRUB. Under advanced menu you can set OS to boot by default and for how long GRUB will be shown. Of course,be careful when using this tool. This probably happens because your partitions aren't mounted at startup, or at least not by same order.


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The only thing that worked for me was installing boot-repair on a USB and booting from it. I found out that whenever I make a change in the BIOS and "Exit and save changes", I'd lose access to Ubuntu, looks like Windows "fixes" the boot and then I can't access GRUB.


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You have to add a BIOS boot partition since your disk is GPT and you used legacy mode. It must be located at the start of a GPT disk, and have a bios_grub flag. It needs 1MB size.


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Try disabling hibernation completely by running powercfg /h off as administrator in windows. Happy that this solved the issue for you!


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I have the same problem, and what I do is to "reboot" windows, and then choose ubuntu from the grub menu. Then I can mount windows partitions with no problem. My theory is that windows hibernates when you choose "shut down". Another one of those misleading/lying windows actions. Now I just never "shut down" windows, I always reboot into a linux distro, and ...


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Had the same problem, disappeared after I used gparted to properly format partitions (root, swap, & home in an extended partition). I followed this dedoimedo's tutorial: http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/dual-boot-windows-7-xubuntu.html I also followed dedoimedo's advice not to take the automatic setup, but chose the 'something else' option. Good ...


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When I was trying to dual boot my system I ended up having to install Windows first on a separate hard drive and then install Ubuntu (or any other Debian distro for that matter) on another hard drive. This was just so that they were not taking up the same space. Probably just an OCD problem, but you can also partition the disk to have space for both ...


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No, windows 8 is not supported by WUBI. It is normally shipped inside the ubuntu ISO, and if one copies the wubi.exe out of the CD, you can use it for wubi based installation. Read the post from one of the Developers.


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You can use MultiCD, SARDU or Grub4dos. If the size of DVD doesn't allow you to put all the ISOs you want, then you can create a multiboot USB using MultiSystem


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The solution is very simple ... Install EaseUs partition in technician mode ... Then go to HDD menue then click with right and chose convert to basic HDD ... There is a risk to loose your files but I have not loss them ... Then you will install ubuntu alongside windows ...


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You should run from terminal sudo update-grub The grub will read the both OS installed on you harddisk


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I have two suggestions... Option #1: Separate ESPs Under EFI, the boot loader resides on "the" EFI System Partition (ESP). I put the word "the" in quotation marks because there's no rule that says you're limited to one ESP. If you create two ESPs on your hard disk, you can use one of them for your first installation and the second ESP for the second ...


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To avoid keeping two GRUB installations that fight one against another, you could install GRUB on a third, separate partition. The accepted answer of Creating a dedicated grub partition before installing ubuntu (which should work after installing Ubuntu too) should describe well enough this possibility.


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Use this - http://www.howtogeek.com/187410/how-to-install-and-dual-boot-linux-on-a-mac/ exept use Gparted partition editor as your starting on linux, and then do effectively the same thing but with mac being installed second intead of first


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For information on installing Ubuntu in dual-boot with Windows 8 or 8.1 on an EFI-based system, see: Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows 8 (64-bit) System (UEFI Supported) The Ubuntu UEFI wiki My page on EFI-mode Linux installations Note that there's a lot of bad information out there relating to EFI-mode installations, so following random ...


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Disclaimer: I have never used EasyBCD; this answer is only based on EasyBCD documentation pages. Follow the links for further instructions. You can choose to skip any of both bootloaders while keeping both of them installed. Since you mentioned you wanted to keep GRUB, the first option will be more relevant to you. Keep GRUB Set Ubuntu/GRUB (or however ...


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(Disclaimer: I've only done this on Windows 7, however I understand it should work just as well on 8.1.) Step 1 Install EasyBcd on Windows. Step 2 Make sure you have a recovery or installation cd/usb for Windows 8. You'll need it. You can generate one from within Windows 8 itself if you don't have one. See ...


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The disc inserted is not readable by this computer As long as you followed the above burning a DVD on OS X, then this is normal. OS X doesn't recognize the bootable Ubuntu Live disk, but you still should be able to 'option boot' and select the live disk from there (it will probably be listed as 'EFI' or 'Windows').


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Using a simple GRUB script as detailed here: Proprietary NVidia drivers with EFI on Mac, to prevent overheating should solve the problem.


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If you have installed without Wubi.exe: At the grub prompt try these commands: set pager=1 ls Now, suppose the output of ls is: (hd0) (hd0,msdos2) (hd0,msdos1), in order to find the linux root filesystem run: ls (hd0,1)/ which should give you all the files/folders in / such as bin/ boot/ cdrom/ dev/ etc/ home/ lib/ etc. Once this is done continue ...


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Run those commands grub> linux (hd0,1)/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda1 grub> initrd (hd0,1)/initrd.img grub> boot Replace hd0 with your hdd number and /dev/sda1 with your partition holding the /boot mainly the dafult will work if you don't have more than one hdd and with default installtion check this for more info When you can boot again you shoulf ...


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Boot into a Ubuntu LiveUSB/CD. Open Gparted and shrink your /dev/sda2/ to have enough space for the Windows installation. Create NTFS storage partition if necessary. Now restart and boot into a Windows installation media in UEFI mode. Assuming that you have a UEFI based system, it would be better to install Windows to an unallocated disk partition. So ...


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No need of commands, use EasyBCD for adding grub again to boot menu. 1.Install windows 7 on a separate drive (Ubuntu previously installed on another drive) After windows installation Ubuntu will not boot. PC will boot into windows automatically. 2.Enter into windows and install EasyBCD for windows 3.Open EasyBCD and select add boot entry. 4.Select grub2 ...


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No need of commands, use EasyBCD for adding grub again to boot menu. Install windows 7 on a separate drive (Ubuntu previously installed on another drive) After windows installation Ubuntu will not boot. PC will boot into windows automatically. Enter into windows and install EasyBCD for windows Open EasyBCD and select add boot entry. Select grub2 Give any ...


2

Banking security is pretty sophisticated. Most of the available holes are on your end. For instance, storing your passwords for your banking site on your system is likely a bad idea unless you keep your computer in a vault. You might want to avoid banking over wireless (especially public wifi which isn't typically encrypted to the level available on private ...


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Does your bank not have two-factor authentication? Most nowadays have a keypad you need a code from to access the banking. Other than that, man in the middle attacks are the main concern as far as I see it.


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I am not sure the cause of the issue, but I was able to work around it by using an older installation (14.04.1) and then upgrade that way...not sure why that worked. Had to enter the setup menu (push the down arrow as soon as you select the boot to USB option and a small white icon appears at the bottom) and then disable 2 options (hit english and then F6 to ...


0

Here's how the issue was resolved in my case, with the help of the volunteers at Boot-Repair: Do a normal install of Ubuntu alongside Windows following the well-known instructions (turn off secure boot, turn off fast boot etc etc). In other words do the stuff I'd done before posting this question. If Ubuntu is inaccessible, run Boot Repair from a live disc ...


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Boot into your ubuntu system then locate and check: /boot/grub/grub.cfg See if it contains the both operating systems (Ubuntu and Windows). Run from the terminal: sudo update-grub Reboot the system and see if you can boot into your OS.



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