Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You can't resize or otherwise edit a mounted partition, and if you're working from inside Ubuntu (rather than, say, from a Live CD or USB), the partition Ubuntu is installed to is mounted. Reboot from a Live medium, and you'll be able to do all the resizing and repartitioning you need. Be careful, you already know why you should back up first!


0

It is best, IMO, to install the Windows OS first, in its NTFS partition as you have done. Then install Ubuntu. When you get to the Replace/Alongside/Something Else choices for partitioning, click the Something Else option. This gets you to a partition editor like gparted or similar. Use that to choose or create partitions for Linux swap (maybe about 12 Gig) ...


0

I've been dual-booting Windows 10 preview for 3 months now: no problems whatsoever in BIOS mode... (Nu UEFI here!) However, I have 2 hard drives in my machine and change the boot order to boot from one hard drive or the other one. I did run for a week or so from one hard drive, but something got screwed up, so I reverted to booting from 2 hard drives ...


0

I'm very sorry to be the harbinger of bad news but the output of gparted clearly shows that there is no bootable Windows on your hard disk. You might still have a boot partition pointer that might contain the text "Windows", but it probably points to a partition that was deleted. Please follow these instructions: How do I recover my accidentally lost ...


0

Boot Ubuntu Live from your CD/Pen Drive Then use gParted / Disk Utility to identify the ubuntu partitions (Usually ext4 and swap space) Then format those partitions You can also use the gParted live to live boot and use the gParted application


0

Try to update the repository and hope this will help you to use the GRUB in windows 8. Please try the below commands, sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair


0

download the latest image of the ubuntu.and write it in a DVD.insert the dvd in your computer's drive.then restart your system keeping the DVD inside the drive.the boot loader automatically load the Ubuntu. it will give you the option that install the Ubuntu along side the windows. click that option.after finishing the setup the Ubuntu will be dual booted ...


0

Actually you can achieve it three ways... whichever the way you find easier and comfortable give your damn shot to that. First of all you need to have ISO file of the version of Ubuntu which you would like to install.Got to: Download Ubuntu Desktop For which version you should go for: 1. How do I find out which version and derivative of Ubuntu is right for ...


0

You just need to repair your GRUB. In order to do that...here is the link which will help you: How can I repair grub? (How to get Ubuntu back after installing Windows?)


0

download Ubuntu, write it to a disk or a usb create some unallocated space to install Ubuntu,i hope you know how to as you already installed two Operating systems boot to Ubuntu live disk or usb and click install it is same as dual boot you can find detailed instructions here


0

So you are using GRUB, selecting the windows 7 entry, selecting Windows in the windows boot manager, and then it fails with the error. This guide should work, however I have not tested this myself and I am not responsible for any data loss. If you are paranoid I would make a entire clone of your hard drive to somewhere else. Things you will need USB with ...


0

thats a function called fastboot in windows 8 you must deactivat it in the power settings than grub bootloder will work normaly whit ubuntu and windows too set this function you must boot the windows partion in securemode or you import your regestry over the installation medium and change it thear


0

I just went for it and there weren't any problems. In my GRUB menu it still has "Windows 7" as the option, but it boots to Windows 10 Tech Preview.


2

It should work just fine. As a recommendation use the 64-bit image of Ubuntu 14.04 because it's long term support and will provide updates and support for a couple of years while 14.10 will only last a couple on months. Yes you can dual boot. I see from your description that you might still want to keep OS X for a while. So also as a recommendation: tick ...


0

Press shift while booting the laptop and hold it until the grub menu appears, then see if system settings is an option in grub as it should get you into BIOS but may not be available in Legacy mode. It works on my Lenovo Ideapad G710 in UEFI


0

As a last-ditch attempt, I burned a LiveCD and voila I could boot into Ubuntu. Not sure if it is a problem with the USB or the laptop but it worked. Posting this from my Ubuntu 14.10


-1

This is the main rule to install ubuntu from uefi Kill UEFI, On Legacy BIOS. Kill Secure Boot. Make partition /boot at least 200 MB inside Ubiquity. Format that partition with option EFI BOOT, not EXT or another format. make root partition / . if it'snot clear try to googling or something.


-1

I have done this from an application in the Windows 7. It should be in win 8 also. We can shrink the size. Afterwards "Ubuntu"can be installed with C.D. This C.D can be created by down-loading an Image file(nrg)and running a virtual drive/burning Disc. 'How to create a virtual drive' may be known from Internet.But we should be careful not to lose Windows ...


0

I solved the problem using the GNU Parted. Other methods of recovering are mentioned at Ubuntu Documentation. Advantage of choosing GNU Parted : No need to download it, it is included in Ubuntu base. How to use GNU Parted Run Parted from the command line to recover your partition. When changing the partition table on your hard drive, you must ensure that ...


0

I managed to fix it by following the instructions at http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/20864-mbr-restore-windows-7-master-boot-record.html So basically, if you have this problem, download PowerISO, format a USB drive, click Create Bootable USB drive, select the Windows Recovery Disc (you can download it online), boot from USB, click command prompt, and ...


3

According to the manual, you enter the BIOS with the Novo button. Please see here.


0

Make a full system backup! Read this Q&A for more information: you're user type 4. Make a full data backup as well. Follow the official Ubuntu Installation instructions until you're at step 4. Choose something else Delete the 13.10 partition Create a new partition Continue the official Ubuntu Installation instructions at step 5


0

I yould go about it in these steps: Boot the Ubuntu Live CD sudo apt-get install testdisk Run testdisk, and try to recover the partition from there. Probably Windows just removed the partition definition from the partition table, which will take just a few seconds for testdisk to fix. Then grub should also work automagically. If the problem's worse, ...


0

From Reddit: When I installed it, it didn't overwrite my Ubuntu partition but it destroyed the GRUB bootloader and made Ubuntu unusable. You may want to use a diffrent hard drive just to be safe. Windows tends to like overwriting the MBR. If it does, to fix it just grab a boot-repair image. That'll rewrite your MBR so it invokes Grub again. ...


0

Whatever you have described seems like a lot of work to do. I would prefer formatting the hard drive and starting everything afresh. This seems like less haste. However, follow the steps below to get what you want. Remember to create a backup of all your data before starting. Install whichever partition tool that you prefer. Re size one of your partitions ...


0

unetbootin has been broken for a while, the best way to create the USB now is to create it using Win32diskimager, the install process should then work.


0

Sure you can. Just make new partition for new version of Ubuntu and install it. When you finish your installation and turn on your computer, you'll get a grub screen to choose in what version of Ubuntu do you want to boot.


0

make the ubuntu 14.x dvd using brasero's iso option or startup disk creator and boot in to the ubuntu installation by selecting usb on boot option use the custom install and select the installation run over the logical partition /dev/sdx1 . when its turn of grub to install select the fisical pendrive /dev/sdx. IF YOU SELECT YOUR HDD/SSD you will brake ...


0

As I am not able to comment because of less reputations I am commenting here. In Windows 8 there are 2 types of boot from which Secure boot is responsible for starting Windows 8 (by default). Go to BIOS settings and disable Secure boot, then Restart .You will get an option now. If still not working change the priority of boot from BIOS settings and keep it ...


0

Yes, of course it is possible, here is a list of what you need to do: Backup Resize the Windows partition using a Live CD Start the Ubuntu installation, and setting the Ubuntu partition on the now empty hard drive space Finish the installation That is the short story.


0

Currently you have the following partitions: 120GB SSD containing Windows installation 2TB HDD containing the Windows BOOT partition, a SWAP partition, and a nearly 2TB Ubuntu partition 3TB NTFS partition for data I assume. What you want to do as far as I understand: resize the nearly 2TB Ubuntu partition to 300GB reformat the leftover place to NTFS ...


0

In ubuntu you can not install programs on other partition but in windows you can if you want a common partition to access fies from windows and ubuntu make one partition on your HDD as NTFS using windows or gparted in ubuntu,this partition would be accessible from both the OS.FAT32 partition can only support 32GB of disk space if you want a larger common ...


0

Given that the boot loader for Windows 10 is new, it stands to reason that they will install it. Technically, they wouldn't need to, but it is almost certainly likely.


0

The native file system for Linux (Ubuntu) is ext4, which Windows does not support. Ubuntu can read and write to NTFS but with some limitations. So, what effectively happens is that Ubuntu can read Windows files but Windows cannot read Ubuntu files. So, the best thing I think, would be to have a separate FAT32 partition to share files between both OSes. ...


0

I think you got it all. An ssd with 240gb wouldn't hurt for dual boot. The additional 1tb HDD is a must have. Install all your software there. However I recommend resize the 1tb HDD to 50% and create a Linux partition from Ubuntu on the empty part. Like: WinPrograms and LinuxPrograms.


0

It will work with win7 and Ubuntu. I have one with ssd drive. EXCELENT PERFORMANCE. With uefi and win8 I don't know. The bios is quit messy and you may take time to figure the proper combination of settings.


0

first gather all space from your hp laptop by deleting recovery partition that would be around 20GB but before that create your windows system recovery DVDs from hp support assistant if you want more space for your ubuntu installation than shrink the windows partition using 'windows administrative tools then computer management then disk management' now you ...


0

I have noticed in differents installations that some "UEFI" not let you install boot OS, so you can install Linux first and then install Windows.


7

Who knows? It's the best part of a year away. The reason I'm answering this rather than voting to close is because even though we don't know yet, it doesn't really matter. Even if Windows Calculator deep-fries GRUB every time you use it, the answer is the same: just restore GRUB. If you're going to use Windows, the most important thing you can know is to ...


1

Unless you have some compelling reason to have a seperate server install, why not just install the required packages in your desktop/ubuntu studio install? Why not just keep your ubuntu studio install (for the lower latency kernel and jack setup),delete your ubuntu install, then just install the packages you use in the studio install?


1

Once you are dualbooting adding another install should be straightforward. Ubuntu server shouldn't be any different in terms of installing to the versions you have alreadt installed. All entries should show up on the grub menu.


0

It seems you need to post detailed information. Boot using Ubuntu live CD, open terminal, execute sudo gdisk -l /dev/sda, and upload results. The result of gdisk commmand will contain your partition table information.


0

Definitely sounds hardware related. I would go to dash, search drivers and let it scan. If it finds anything change to that and then see if happens again If does crash (or if you don't want to do above steps), notice time, boot up again and sift through the logs. Or pastebin them and update your answer. The logs should give some indication of what is ...


0

you can update grub if you are able to boot in to ubuntu sudo update-grub It will add the boot entries or use boot repair from live cd sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair for dual boot windows and ubuntu


0

Note: Answer to your QWERY probably next Question: you can update grub if you are able to boot in to ubuntu sudo update-grub It will add the boot entries or use boot repair by running ubuntu live cd: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:yannubuntu/boot-repair sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y boot-repair && boot-repair for dual booting ...


0

Thank you so much guys!!! And byteCommander for the math.. :P I figured my way out installing Ubuntu first, partitioning with two primary and in a way so that Windows finds itself a primary partition to install itself into. Started Ubuntu.. formatted that in NTFS using GParted. Then installed Windows in it. Worked like a charm. But then, the boot menu was ...


0

It is clear to me now (almost) how this DavFS2 works (almost). Had I only realized.. it was a lot of work, to get it running, and an overkill considering it doesn't provide syncing the way I expected : the way the native BoxSync application does in Windows. Also considering the time lags and the errors, it seemed unjustified to proceed with more ...


0

I think you need to start again, windows likes to be first. Back up your data from /home. Install windows, it will use all 500gb. Boot windows. Run all disk utilities to defragment and compress c:. Now using windows partition split your disk, possibly making a d: drive for windows data. Your disk will now look something like c: 150gb, d: 50gb, unused 300gb ...


0

You may shrink ext4 partitions only when they are unmounted (enlarging would work also at mounted state) with gParted, to free unpartitioned space for Windows. But therefore, you must have enough unused space inside the partition. Step-by-step: (note: inscriptions may vary, as I translate it from the German version) Boot your machine from an Ubuntu live ...


0

Your notebook use UEFI? If yes, you must change setting in BIOS to Legacy boot. After that just install Ubuntu from CD or Bootable USB



Top 50 recent answers are included