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First, note there is a typo in mount your command. It should be: $ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/username Here /dev/sda2 is the device (in this case, a hard drive's partition) you want to access, and /media/username is your mountpoint, i.e., the location in the filesystem where you want to mount the device. To answer your questions: Yes, using cd is the ...


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Run those commands grub> linux (hd0,1)/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda1 grub> initrd (hd0,1)/initrd.img grub> boot Replace hd0 with your hdd number and /dev/sda1 with your partition holding the /boot mainly the dafult will work if you don't have more than one hdd and with default installtion check this for more info When you can boot again you shoulf ...


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I have two suggestions... Option #1: Separate ESPs Under EFI, the boot loader resides on "the" EFI System Partition (ESP). I put the word "the" in quotation marks because there's no rule that says you're limited to one ESP. If you create two ESPs on your hard disk, you can use one of them for your first installation and the second ESP for the second ...


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From the screen photo, It seems like the installer wiped your hard drive. This was a known issue before 14.04, but it should have been fixed since, according to the bug status. If it really is as you said, please file a new bug report for the Ubiquity package. I hope you made a backup before attempting a reinstall. If not, let this be you a lecture. If ...


2

If you have installed without Wubi.exe: At the grub prompt try these commands: set pager=1 ls Now, suppose the output of ls is: (hd0) (hd0,msdos2) (hd0,msdos1), in order to find the linux root filesystem run: ls (hd0,1)/ which should give you all the files/folders in / such as bin/ boot/ cdrom/ dev/ etc/ home/ lib/ etc. Once this is done continue ...


2

You should not (usually even can not) create any partitions for Ubuntu in Windows. Just give it a bit of unallocated space and the installer will set it up properly. Inside the Ubuntu installer, you (or the installer automatically) will create a root partition (format as ext4 and select: "Use as /") and a swap partition (format as linux-swap"). That is ...


2

Banking security is pretty sophisticated. Most of the available holes are on your end. For instance, storing your passwords for your banking site on your system is likely a bad idea unless you keep your computer in a vault. You might want to avoid banking over wireless (especially public wifi which isn't typically encrypted to the level available on private ...


1

Try disabling hibernation completely by running powercfg /h off as administrator in windows. Happy that this solved the issue for you!


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Does your bank not have two-factor authentication? Most nowadays have a keypad you need a code from to access the banking. Other than that, man in the middle attacks are the main concern as far as I see it.


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For information on installing Ubuntu in dual-boot with Windows 8 or 8.1 on an EFI-based system, see: Installing Ubuntu on a Pre-Installed Windows 8 (64-bit) System (UEFI Supported) The Ubuntu UEFI wiki My page on EFI-mode Linux installations Note that there's a lot of bad information out there relating to EFI-mode installations, so following random ...


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Try holding down the Option (or Alt) key as you start up the computer. This should provide you with a menu you can use to select the OS to boot. Using that menu, boot to OS X. You can then re-install rEFInd. With any luck that will fix the problem. If you continue to boot straight to Ubuntu, look for a directory called /sys/firmware/efi. If it's present, ...


1

On my ThinkPad Ubuntu 14.04 went into the infinite loop, Ubuntu 15.04 did not. Furthermore: proper shutdown in Windows UEFI on (important) CSM yes SecureBoot off After installing Ubuntu, only boot to Windows was possible: boot Ubuntu from live and install + run boot-repair. This way grub is the first thing that comes up. Windows boot loader can be ...


1

I realize this is an old article, however I felt that I should point this out. This is no longer an issue. It failed the first time around, but then the install manager somehow got the dependencies installed without my interaction. I tried again, and it installed Yumi with no problem. Now on to mounting my USB drive...


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Fundamentally, the issue is not the partition table type (GPT vs. MBR); it's the firmware type and boot mode (EFI/UEFI vs. BIOS/CSM/legacy). Windows ties them together quite tightly -- Windows may boot in EFI/UEFI mode only from GPT disks, whereas it may boot in BIOS/CSM/legacy mode only from MBR disks. Because of this, if you boot the Windows installer in ...



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