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You can play with setting different values to different trackpoint properties and maybe compare props of your Lenovo trackpoint with Dell's. Use the command xinput list to see all input devices and their IDs. Then use xinput list-props $ID to see what the device is capable of and xinput set-prop $ID $PropID $value. I wrote some examples in another topic, but ...


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After I posted the question, I began to google on AMD Radeon graphic card. I came across a webpage mentioning that the stable Linux Kernel 4.4 just released in January, 2016 has featured numerous AMD GPU additions on AMD graphics processors. I followed the instructions given by ...


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"Device a170" shows that your distribution's lspci doesn't yet know the PCI ID of that device, so it's likely that the kernel driver does not know it either. Consider using a more modern distribution, or at least update the kernel.


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It depends on the adapter firmware how it declares itself to PCI bus. Some Nvidia laptop adapters declare themselves as a 3D controller. That does not make any practical difference. The reason for that is probably because in an Optimus dual graphics systems, the Nvidia chip is not a real adapter. It outputs through the Intel adapter anyway and does only ...


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You can switch them this way: sudo aticonfig --px-igpu to the integrated adapter. sudo aticonfig --px-dgpu to the descrete adapter. Log off and log on after that. You can see the status by aticonfig --pxl You can also switch the adapters using Catalyst Control Center GUI utility. Note: This should work on a supported Ubuntu version (14.04 or ...


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In many cases, the issue with "...i'm getting a good connection when im close to the router.. but once i step a few meters away .. the signal drastically drops..." is a sign that the Linux driver is unable to sense and change to the antenna connector that is active, that is, has the wire connected. This is a well-known issue with the rtl8723be. There are a ...


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This will work on your current kernel wget https://wireless.wiki.kernel.org/_media/en/users/drivers/iwlwifi-7265-ucode-25.17.12.0.tgz tar zxvf iwlwifi-7265-ucode-25.17.12.0.tgz cd iwlwifi-7265-ucode-25.17.12.0 sudo cp iwlwifi-7265D-12.ucode /lib/firmware/iwlwifi-3165-12.ucode Reboot


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Find your current kernel version and follow the steps of any answer to What's a simple way to recompile the kernel?. Let's go with the accepted answer for the sake of simplicity. Apply the patch mentioned in the bug report. Inside the root directory of the kernel source: wget -O rts522a-20150628.patch http://lkml.org/lkml/diff/2015/6/28/134/1 patch -p1 ...


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It looks like you removed iwlwifi module. You need to re-install the kernel. Run in terminal: sudo apt-get install --reinstall linux-image-`uname-r` linux-image-extra-`uname -r` and reboot.


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OK, as per this blogpost, adding nogpumanager to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT in /etc/default/grub solves the issue. Thus, the line in /etc/default/grub should look like: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash nogpumanager" After you edit the file, don't forget to run: sudo update-grub


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Got it to work by installing the xserver-xorg-video-amdgpu package



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