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6

Muru's tip about DKMS put me on the right track. Seeing the zfs-dkms package I looked at /var/lib/dpkg/info/zfs-dkms.list which names /usr/src/zfs-0.6.2/dkms.conf. I didn't have that file, nor any of /usr/src/zfs-0.6.2. Aha! I installed zfs to import an existing zpool and mount filesystems from a FreeBSD system, including a /usr/src. So when I built ...


5

Use dpkg -S, as in dpkg -S /path/to/file. For sorting list in column, Follow: dpkg -S /usr/share | tr " ," "\n" | sort


5

Packages (like postfix) may install or generate configuration files (files that usually go in the /etc folder). During this process, there may be options that can be changed by the user. On installation, you are usually asked to set these options. In the case of postfix, it involves what type of server you're running, the hostname, and allowed IP addresses ...


2

Within a Debian package, there's no way to say "Allow installations on 14.04 only". That has to happen at the apt repository level (which I'll get to shortly later). The semi-exception to this is that because Trusty is newer than Precise, Trusty will have some library packages renamed (which, as long as the user's not using a PPA that provides these ...


2

Because, your package is installed in release/environment that it will not able to work in, That means your packages control dependencies missing something. What I expect that you haven't put dependencies version conditions, which could used to let package to be installed on single release if the dependency version available only in that release, example ...


1

sudo rm /var/lib/dpkg/lock should do the trick. You can use ps afx|grep dpkg to check if there is still a process runnning at the same time. sudo killall dpkg will stop all running dpkg processes. If you need to cancel the dropbox installation, try sudo dpkg --force-remove-reinstreq --remove nautilus-dropbox


1

If you wish to do a comparison between the two, and have a movable list you could do: dpkg --get-selections>new.txt This will take your output and send it to a text file ('new.txt'). From there you can use grep to search through. For example: grep '^linux*' new.txt Or if you just need the packages quick combine the two dpkg --get-selections|grep ...


1

In order to fix broken alternatives link for awk try: sudo update-alternatives --set awk /usr/bin/mawk Verify if it is fix with command: awk '{print $0}' /etc/passwd Redo apt command: apt-get dist-upgrade If this doen't work and directory /etc/alternatives doesn't exists, try: sudo mkdir /etc/alternatives sudo ...


1

sudo dpkg --remove --force-remove-reinstreq --dry-run libgfortran3:amd64 That's just a dry-run. I'm not sure what removing libgfortran3 will take with it but run that and see. Assuming it's not going to gobble the whole system, run it again without the --dry-run and then you can sudo apt-get install ... the packages you need back.


1

APT refers to these packages as "obsolete". Evidently there is no direct way to list these, but you could do: aptitude search '~o' Or alternatively: apt-show-versions | grep 'No available version' Source: How do I get a list of obsolete packages? If you want a GUI tool you can do this with Synaptic by using the built-in "local or obsolete" filter.


1

On the old installation run the following command: sudo apt-get install dpkg-repack fakeroot && sudo mkdir ~/dpkg-repack; cd ~/dpkg-repack && sudo fakeroot -u dpkg-repack dpkg --get-selections | grep install | cut -f1 that will put all packages into a folder in your home folder called "dpkg-repack". Copy that to the home folder on your new ...


1

You can also find out the package path from the package name: $dpkg -L <package name> e.g. $dpkg -L zip



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