Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

I'll bet you can't do this: nslookup rtfm.mit.edu but you can do this: nslookup rtfm.mit.edu 8.8.8.8 If you check the content of your /etc/resolv.conf file, it's probably empty, or pointing your DNS resolver to something your Ubuntu can't reach. /etc/resolv.conf can be configured manually with any plain text editor (vim, nano, etc), or from ...


3

The simplest way to set custom DNS on Ubuntu 14.04, is by editing your base file of the resolv.conf.d folder: sudo nano /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/base Add your DNS in the file, like this : nameserver 8.8.8.8 nameserver 8.8.4.4 Then update your resolv configuration : sudo resolvconf -u


3

Update: As revealed in the comments bellow the question, OP wants to know the DNS server that the router uses. If you use automatic connection, all of the answers given here will tell you address of your router, which means requests go to your router first.The router in turn has its own settings, which forward whatever DNS request you send to router's DNS. ...


2

Your problem is that you are specifying a TCP port specification (https://) where commands are expecting a host name. ping uses the ICMP protocol, not TCP. For example: $ ping -c 3 http://slashdot.org ping: unknown host http://slashdot.org $ ping -c 3 slashdot.org PING slashdot.org (216.34.181.45) 56(84) bytes of data. 64 bytes from slashdot.org ...


2

With nmcli you can check which dns servers dnsmasq is configured with: nmcli dev show wlan0 | grep -i dns An example would be: $ nmcli dev show wlan0 | grep -i dns IP4.DNS[1]: 10.11.12.1 IP4.DNS[2]: 10.11.13.1


2

To show all DNS for each network device, except lo: for i in /sys/class/net/*; do \ awk -F/ '! /lo/ {system("nmcli dev show "$(NF)" | grep \"DNS\|DEVICE\"")}' <<< "$i"; \ done Example output GENERAL.DEVICE: eth0 IP4.DNS[1]: 192.168.20.1


1

nmcli version 0.9.10 You can use either of these commands: nmcli -t -f IP4.DNS device show eth0 IP4.DNS[1]:192.168.1.1 IP4.DNS[2]:8.8.8.8 nmcli -t -f IP4.DNS connection show conn-name IP4.DNS[1]:192.168.1.1 IP4.DNS[2]:8.8.8.8


1

The best way to check which resolver you are actually using is to visit this website. https://dnsleaktest.com/ Further explanations are in a webupd8.com article : Encrypt DNS Traffic In Ubuntu With DNSCrypt [Ubuntu PPA]


1

As you say, you can't put wildcards in /etc/hosts. It just doesn't work. That really leaves you with one option: mangle the actual DNS manually. There are several ways you could do this but two spring to mind as the best options... You could run a fully-flegded DNS server locally. This can be a good idea if your internet connection is slow and you'd like ...


1

You can have any number or services on one physical server with one IP address. Different services will use different ports.


1

Am answer that better matches the question.... You need to define a zone that declares your name server as a master, so that it will offer the answers to other servers, so you need at least a line: type master; within that zone. Here's what I have in my server's /etc/bind/named.conf.local (on 14:04LTS), except that my file actually has 'notify no;' in ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible