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3

Your question seems somewhat vague, so I have prepared two separate answers for you: If what you're asking is whether or not you can write DNS records from the server /etc/hosts file, the answer is no. You can change /etc/hosts all you like, but it will only affect the server's view of the corresponding IP address, not the Internet's view of the IP ...


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I think you misunderstand what the /etc/hosts file does. The /etc/hosts file does not propagate across the internet. It only works and affects local lookups on your computer itself. For example, I have 10.0.50.123 mydmzbox in my /etc/hosts file - that 'hostname' doesn't actually resolve to anything anywhere else, Internet or otherwise, and just ...


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You would only need a virtual domain in Apache if you're going to run some type of webmail application (SquirrelMail, Roundcube, etc.) The hostname of host.example.net is important for a couple of reasons. First, it allows you to assign specific services such as mail and web requests for your domain to be routed to particular servers if you need those ...


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There is a typo in the above command: /usr/local/bin/noip2 -C (-C (dash capital C) will create the default config file) To uninstall if you aren't comfortable reviewing the changes made and reversing them, I suggest you open a ticket with no-ip.com. Source


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Search domain means the domain that will be automatically appended when you only use the hostname for a particular host or computer. This is basically used in a local network. Lets say you have a domain name like xyz.com (it may be available globally or may be local only) and you have 100 computers in the LAN. Now you want this domain name to be ...


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Turns out somehow my etc/nsswitch.conf is missing (no idea why though). Fixed this problem with echo 'hosts:files dns' | sudo tee /etc/nsswitch.conf, but maybe a better option will be to obtain the default nsswitch.conf file.


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Yes, there are. However the leaks are coming from the proxy server and not from your computer. If the proxy server is being used by many people it would be somewhat harder (although not impossible) to link the DNS leaks back to you.


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If your ISP (or your government) is intercepting your outgoing connection to port 53 then one thing you can do is set up a VPN to a server outside your country and route the DNS traffic through it. It will cost you a few $/month though. If this is an option search the net for "VPN servers". Don't be tempted to use a free VPN, DNS is way too important to ...


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You are doing everything right like putting the entries in /etc/hosts, server address in /etc/resolv.conf, the /etc/nsswitch.conf looks good too. The problem you are having is due to the understanding of a very specific term "nameserver". All the commands used to resolve IP address to hostname and vice versa used the nameserver addresses from ...



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