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The term "server" means a piece of software that offers a service to clients. A server usually waits for a client to contact it, and then sends the reply to the client. For further information, read about the Client-Server-Model OpenSSH server SSH (Secure Shell) is a protocol to get encrypted remote access to a machine. The machine you want to access ...


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I'll try to be as brief and simple as possible. OpenSSH Server:- It is a server that allows remotely controlling or transferring of files between computers. It allows you to remotely control the files on the sever via an OpenSSH client application. DNS Server:- It is a server that points a domain name to an Ip address of a computer. Its like a ...


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nslookup only does proper DNS resolution, which is significantly different from the Name Service Switch subsystem that your other applications use; that is to say nslookup ignores /etc/hosts and mDNS. To test local resolutions like that, use something that uses NSS. ping <hostname> for example. Here's a simple demo based on an /etc/hosts entry on my ...


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The /run mountpoint is supposed to be a tmpfs mounted during early boot, available and writable to for all tools at any time during bootup. What does this mean? This means /run is tmpfs which means data on it is not a permanent storage, it looks like the /tmp, so you can depend on saving any data there since this dir will completely wiped with ...


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So I figured out what the problem was. When I ran the following command sudo resolvconf -u I got this error: /etc/resolvconf/update.d/libc: Warning: /etc/resolv.conf is not a symbolic link to /run/resolvconf/resolv.conf` I solved this error by deleting by deleting /etc/resolv.conf and recreating the symbolic link. You can do that using the following ...


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To answer part 2 of your question, you can edit /etc/network/interfaces, and add the following line: dns-nameservers 8.8.8.8 4.2.2.2 So that your interfaces file looks something like this: auto <interfacename> iface <interfacename> inet dhcp dns-nameservers 8.8.8.8 4.2.2.2 Make sure to replace < interfacename > with wlan0 or whatever ...


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One way to stop Network Manager from adding dns-servers to /etc/resolv.conf file is to do this: First open the nm conf file /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf: sudo vim /etc/NetworkManager/NetworkManager.conf And add this to the [main] section: dns=none Save and exit.


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My personal favorite is to use line supersede domain-name-servers in /etc/dhcp/dhclient.conf. No matter what dns access point provides , your ubuntu will always use those dns specified in dhclient.conf Sample from my file #send host-name "andare.fugue.com"; send host-name = gethostname(); #send dhcp-client-identifier 1:0:a0:24:ab:fb:9c; #send ...


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I had something similar happen on a Mint laptop. I came to this and similar questions through a search on "DNS stopped working". My wired connection was perfectly fine and the wifi connection sorta worked except for DNS. And even DNS worked sometimes. I tried a lot of suggestions with no luck. I finally solved it when I came across the suggestion to run ...


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OP's own answer: I found the anwers for my problem. So I just need to forward port 80 in my routers. Now I can access my server using internet network.


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This is most likely a configuration problem on the server side. The vpn server should only push domains that he can resolve. For example if you use an openvpn server a user configuration might look like this: ifconfig-push 172.16.0.51 255.255.255.0 push "route 172.16.1.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.0.1" push "route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 172.16.0.6" push ...


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Open your postfix configuration file (usually /etc/postfix/main.cf) in a text editor. I like vim. $ sudo vim /etc/postfix/main.cf Find the line where mydestination is set. It probably looks something like this: mydestination = $myhostname, localhost.$mydomain, localhost Comment that line out by prefixing it with a #. # mydestination = $myhostname, ...


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The service management system has changed. Every system management toolset has own utilities. The utility that you are used to using is one of the ones that come with upstart, which is a trivial shim for initctl restart. But this is Ubuntu version 15. You aren't using upstart any more. You're using systemd, and the service control commands are ...



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