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2

Yes you can, go in : Parameters > Display and set “Scale for menu and title bars” to the value that is best suited for you. It will scale all your desktop while keeping your original 1080p resolution.


0

This can be a hardware problem, so if you have a dedicated graphics card with the driver installed, make sure the display is connected to it. Also make sure that there isn't an issue with the Display (try connect it to another computer and see the results or try another HDMI cable).


2

Try upgrading the package that contains the who command; even if you did use a strange version of the ISO to install from, an update should replace it: Find out what package owns who: which who # find out where 'who' binary is dpkg -S /path/to/who Then: apt-get update apt-get install <package name from dpkg -S command> If it still doesn't ...


0

You have pam-mount? Or other configuration? Try: PS1="\s-\v\$" If it works try: Open /etc/bashrc (Redhat and friends) / or /etc/bash.bashrc (Debian/Ubuntu) or /etc/bash.bashrc.local (Suse and others) file and append following code: vi /etc/bashrc or $ sudo gedit /etc/bashrc Append the code as follows If id command returns zero, you’ve root access. if [ ...


0

I just had the same problem with a Dell u2913wm connected to a i5-5775c Iris Pro 6200 via Displayport. When I switched inputs on the monitor, it would not display an image afterwards. The problem could be solved by using ssh to log into the machine and running: env DISPLAY=:0 xset dpms force off env DISPLAY=:0 xset dpms force on While not very practical, ...


2

You can allow all local (ie logged in) users to use the display by giving the command in a terminal on the graphics screen: xhost +local: Depending how you start your server you can put this command in a startup file, or even configure the server with the option.


0

I've just experienced this same issue with my new Spyder5 on Ubuntu 14.04. For the sake of completeness, (and for my own future self googling this :-), I'll add all issues I've ran into and their solution: Problem: dispcalGUI does not detect the instrument at all Solution: Argyll CMS needs to be downloaded and installed manually, as stated in the ...


0

If you want to open a program on a remote display from your computer you have to allow the remote connections. Usually you have to make a file /etc/X0.hosts for display 0, /etc/X1.hosts for display 1, etc. Maybe you need to do it also in your case. Try also writing the whole hostname when exporting display export DISPLAY=hostname:0 Or make all in one line ...


0

I have solved the issue. I managed to create a .xprofile file and saved it to the home directory. I then added xrandr --newmode "1280x1024_60.00" 109.00 1280 1368 1496 1712 1024 1027 1034 1063 -hsync +vsync xrandr --addmode VGA1 "1280x1024_60.00" The only trouble I had was permissions with saving a .xprofile which somehow was not an issue when I did ...


0

Very common problem. Easy fix. This is for a physical PC, but works fine in VirtualBox too. You need to modify your xorg.conf file (which contains X Window configurations) to include the horizontal sync and vertical refresh rates that match with your monitor. First of all, google your monitor name and find a site that lists its horizontal sync and ...


3

You can also take a look at the FakeXRandR project. FakeXRandR is a tool to cheat an X11 server to believe that there are more monitors than there actually are. It hooks into libXRandR and libXinerama and replaces certain, configurable monitor configurations with multiple virtual monitors. A tool that comes with this package can be used to configure how ...


0

my computer restarted and everything is working fine now. I have no idea what keeps happening but it is working now. thank you for helping me out. if I find out what is happening then I will let you know in case other people have the same problems.


0

It seems, there is something wrong with your system as xrandr fails to detect the adequate screen resolution. You didn't specify the target resolution you wanted, I assume this is 1920x1080. You can try to force it by following these instructions : 1/ use gtf to create a new mode line gtf 1920 1080 59.9 if you want another resolution gtf res_X res_Y ...


-1

try forcing the output resolution with xrandr. If it doesnt work reboot passing "nomodeset" param to the kernel.


2

You need to install the VirtualBox Guest Additions into Ubuntu. This gives a few benefits, including resizing the Ubuntu screen to match the host window. Start the VM, then select from the VirtualBox menus: Devices -> CD/DVD Devices -> VBoxGuestAdditions<version>.iso. Then follow the instructions.


9

I took this from an answer at superuser please give them an upvote if it helps you, you can use fakexinerama for achieving what you want: Fake Xinerama is a replacement libXinerama library that instead of querying the XServer reads ~/.fakexinerama and provides fake information about Xinerama screens based on this file. It can be used to fake a ...


0

You need to make the xrandr commands run on startup. Unfortunately, a lot of people have trouble making the commands permanent, so that they run on startup, but I'll show you how to do it the easy way: Create a bash script, xrandr.sh for example, and place your xrandr commands into it. It should look something like this #!/bin/bash xrandr --newmode ...


0

Of course you can modify the resolution. You simply have to select the value that fits your screen from drop-down list I surrounded in red here:


2

I had the exact same problem with one of my monitors as well. The best suggestion I can give you would be to put those commands into a script file. I named mine fixres.bsh and put it in my home ~ directory. Using your code below, I added the interpreter line as the first line, then added your code. #!/bin/bash xrandr --newmode "1680x1050_60.00" 146.25 ...


2

Press ALT and hold it and try to move the window upwards so that you can reach the controls.


0

reinstalling unity will do it for you. you can do it by going to a terminal by pressing ctrl+alt+T then copy past this to it. sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install --reinstall ubuntu-desktop sudo apt-get install --reinstall unity this should solve your problem because KDE have broken your unity,


0

First, login using the text user interface. Then, you can either: Remove your xorg.conf file with sudo rm /etc/X11/xorg.conf Or: Remove the line from the file by editing it with nano -> sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf I would recommend the second option. Both will solve your problem and on reboot you'll have your GUI back.


1

You could configure sudo to not need a password for a particular command and go back to using a non-root cron. For this, assuming a user id of "user" wants to run the command FreeFileSync as root, create a file /etc/sudoers.d/user with user ALL = NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/FreeFileSync The command must be given with a full pathname. If you don't explicitly list ...


1

I think you can achieve what you want with xcalib If it's not installed: sudo apt-get install xcalib try something like xcalib -i -a xcalib -invert -alter xcalib -co 70 -a To reset screen xcalib -c For more info about xcalib check out http://manpages.ubuntu.com/manpages/precise/man1/xcalib.1.html or xcalib -h Following link may also ...


0

Display Link has released a new Ubuntu driver (for 14.04 LTS). This driver will support up to 2 displays connected to DisplayLink devices. More than 2 DisplayLink displays may work, but not supported or tested by DisplayLink. Resolutions up to 4K are supported on the appropriate DisplayLink hardware. Device families supported are: DL-5xxx ...


0

You could use xrandr, a tool which enables you to set your desired resolution through the command-line. There are several guides on setting up xrandr to work for your display. This article should enable you to set it up correctly - I used it and got xrandr working fine. Unfortunately, a lot of people have trouble making the commands permanent, so that they ...


0

I switched to another resolution and then revert to the original resolution. It did the trick. But I still don't understand why this bug happened in the first place.


0

I have the same issue of it being greyed out. I need to turn off the inbuilt display in order to use the external as the primary, and only monitor.


0

After researching it thoroughly, here are the steps to achieve this (terminal commands in grey): xrandr -q (to display info about displays, including the names. Mine are VGA-1 and DVI-I-1, used below) xrandr –output VGA-1 –left-of DVI-I-1 right click on the taskbar (panel) and choose panel settings enter the horizontal resolution of the left monitor in ...


5

Ubuntu does not recognize a new monitor when it is replaced on the fly. That is, when the computer is running, and you yank out the cable of the old monitor and put in the new one. This is not safe, and may damage your computer and / or monitor. The proper method is to turn the computer off. Turn the old monitor off. Unplug the old monitor from its power ...


0

I haven't had success doing this. The command: sudo update-grub halts after: Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.13.0-61-generic I haven't found anything on how to fix that. I'm using Xubuntu on a Windows 10 Hyper-V.


0

For whatever reason, my other monitor can't be used unless I suspend the system before I login. Every time I suspend, the monitor is able to work as an extended display (after I configure the settings). If I don't suspend, then the monitor will not function at all. It would be nice if I didn't have to suspend and configure the settings every time I want to ...



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