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cheap cables do not fully implement all connections to 15 pins see this http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=12530493&postcount=16


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System Tools -> Preferences -> Power Click on "screen brightness" in the Tip message: Tip: screen brightness affects how much power is used Select "Never" for "Turn screen off when inactive for:"


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Try this solution. Use sudo apt-get install nvidia-331 nvidia-settings nvidia-prime and then reboot. You can use application named nvidia x server to configure the display.


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It means that the system cannot find an appropriate driver for the device (i.e. no driver is 'claiming' it) - it should be supported by the S3 legacy driver, so I'm not sure why that would be the case.


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I had similar problems with Ubuntu 12.04 & EliteBook 8530w. External display didn't work. I changed display driver to a newer version and it helped. System Settings -> Additional Drivers.


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Ok, I've found a solution to this issue: Once you that screen appears, hold the Host+F1 key (it should show the Ubuntu console), and then then the Host+F7 combination (goes back to the Ubuntu installation window). Before you do that just make sure you have the Function keys set to act as normal function keys on OSX.


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I have exactly the same problem - I believe this is Ubuntu problem. I installed Windows 7 without problems. I also installed different distro of Linux (mint) but then it is very slow. Playing a bit I managed to install Ubuntu 14.10 - I believe that there is driver problem in Ubuntu (or in general Linux) not working properly with AMD driver in Yosemite.


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This is what I've done, and it works a lot better for me. My screen has a lot of brightness increments, as it's LED backlit and someone thought to take advantage of that. sudo apt-get install xbacklight # ..and test it.. xbacklight -dec 20 xbacklight -inc 20 # If this works for you, you can proceed I'm using KDE, but this applies for Gnome as well. For ...


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Looks like this question was asked when Unity was brand new and not many people were using it. None of the answers listed make use of the Unity menu bar, which imo is the only worthwhile place to have a system monitor. Apparently the things in the menu bar are called "Application Indicators" and so far the closest thing I've found to iStat Menus is ...


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That might not be a complete solution but may be it could help you since it would give you much better than 800x600. I have an IMac Retina. I run Ubuntu 14.04 inside Vmware Fusion. After enabling full retina display support in Fusion, I can set Ubuntu to support 2560x1600. In full screen mode, it is not as nice as the native retina with OSX but, it's still ...


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I had an underscanning issue (big black borders), although all of the information about my monitor was displayed correctly. I changed the scan setting under Catalyst Display Manager > DTV and everything is fine. I am not using a digital tv, but the result is what counts.


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If you old PC is connected to network, do some form of remote login from your laptop to your other PC machine (ssh -X or vnc, etc). If it is not connected to network, but has network support, cross link the two with an Ethernet cable.


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Most laptop screens (the ones built into the laptop lid) have a proprietary connector to the motherboard and aren't directly compatible with VGA (or even DVI) -- in essence, the electronics that would normally be in the monitor, to translate VGA or DVI input to the actual screen addressing (and brightness/color information) for pixel control are incorporated ...


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Method 1: Disable Unknown Display Click the Unknown Display Box and below it's on, turn it Off and Apply, Every time you Install Ubuntu for the first Time the Cause is Unknown Display. Method 2: Changing Display Driver to X.Org If you encountering Problems but the First Method doesn't Work, Try this Method Open System Settings once opened you will see ...


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Your computer uses resolution with different aspect ratio than what is native for your monitor. Go to System Settings → Display and pick a different one.


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What you're trying to do is impossible. A "DisplayPort Splitter" doesn't add any functionality to the existing "DisplayPort": it just does what it's designed to do: transmit electrical signals from one wire to two wires. (note: electric, not electronic) So you cannot get multiple workspaces to display on one monitor and have half on one and the other ...


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If monitor 2 is a TV, that is absolutely no problem: just use the "Input" button to switch between input signals. (or use the remote) If Monitor 2 is a real computer monitor, the easiest (and safe) way is to add a piece of hardware called a KVM switch. Not only will that allow you to use the 1 monitor on 2 computers, but it will also allow you to use 1 ...


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There is a known bug for Intel Baytrail graphic, also for a nVidia GeForce GT 630M [10de:0de9] graphic card. If you're using the nVidia graphic card, the solution is easy, just install the proprietary driver from the "Additional Drivers" Another workaround is to edit your "/etc/default/grub" file, change GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="" into: ...


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I ran into something similar on a 4-Monitor configuration connected via DisplayPort to a NVidia GK107 [NVS 510] running under KUbuntu 14.04 Whenever one of the Displays is being disabled, the other Displays will randomly rearrange their positions. When switching the Display back on this does not bring the old configuration back. Just recently I noticed a ...


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locate --existing monitors.xml Low quality queue reviewers: Yup, that's the answer to "Where are the files where the monitors are configured?"


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after installing the nvidia drivers the phantom display is gone. I've reached my goal to be able to comfigure nvidia The details are in the original post. Hope this saves someone the time i spent investigating the matter. Cheers.


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When in the described situation, that the main monitor is there in Ubuntu, but there is no actual monitor, I found one solution. Simply run the "Displays" thing, well press the Ubuntu button, type Displays, and enter. As soon as that configuration window open, it realizes that there is no monitor, and all windows are moved to the laptop's monitor. Other ...


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You could create a script to run at startup that uses your quickest workaround, I.E. unity --reset sudo service lightdm restart This shouldn't have any negative consequences if the external isn't connected and should resolve the problem if it is.... Source: Question


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On Ubuntu 14.04: 1) Move away from X with ctrl+alt+f2 2) Login (as the user having this problem) 3) Type these: cp -a ~/.kde/share/apps/kscreen ~/.kde/share/apps/kscreen.bak rm -f ~/.kde/share/apps/kscreen/* sudo reboot First command is not mandatory.


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echo $DISPLAY won't work. If it did, you wouldn't need to set or export DISPLAY in the first place. You'll need to find out what the appropriate value is using some other way. If you want to find out what DISPLAY your user is currently running, try: w -h $USER | awk '$2 ~ /:[0-9.]*/{print $2}' Then you can do: export DISPLAY=$(w -h $USER | awk '$2 ~ ...


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The command should be: #!/bin/bash export DISPLAY=$(echo $DISPLAY) Here you need to use the command substitution functionality i.e. $(command) of bash. EDIT: Now after seeing your full script i am getting the whole picture. First create a file in your home directory for example /home/abc/display_check having the following line: echo $DISPLAY Now ...


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Due to the lack of memory and processing power of the chromebooks, it is probably closing kde to save you memory. You can start it again using the command sudo startkde. I'm not 100% sure how chromebooks handles crouton and I know that this might not be the ideal answer but I hope that this will at least help you get back to your desktop without having to ...



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