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I have exactly the same problem. I have two monitors, one on DVI, one on VGA. Everything worked fine with Kubuntu 15.10. Now, with 16.04, you can see that during the boot up, the VGA monitor stays black, but Ubuntu thinks it activated it. Also for me, the only workaround is to deactivate the second screen in the system settings and to re-activate it. Then, ...


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I'm having the same issue. VMWare workstation. Doesn't detect second display at all.


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Yes, it is possible to install Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on this system. Canonical has has discontinued support for the proprietary fglrx driver but the existing radeon/amdgpu drivers are sufficient replacement. Note: I had "vanilla" Ubuntu 15.10 installed on this system from USB drive and then upgraded to 16.04 LTS.


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I had a problem with setting the resolution higher on my Dell Inspiron 1000 when I was running Lubuntu. My assumption is that by VGA you mean resolution higher than 640x480. The fix I found was to set xforcevesa. Now I have 1024x768, 800x600, and 640x480 on Lubuntu 16.04. If you need help setting xforcevesa see the following. How to set xforcevesa? This ...


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The following are possible: Intel driver - UMS: VGA - Analog VGA output LVDS - Laptop panel DP1 - DisplayPort output TV - Integrated TV output TMDS-1 - First DVI SDVO output TMDS-2 - Second DVI SDVO output Intel driver - KMS: LVDS1 - Laptop panel VGA1 - Analog VGA output DVI1 - Digital video output Radeon Driver: VGA-0 - Analog VGA output LVDS - ...


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What it means In the line: HDMI1 connected primary 1920x1080+0+0 (normal left inverted right x axis y axis) 890mm x 500mm indeed, the last section: 890mm x 500mm gives you the size of your screen x/y in mm Why the difference? In this question, we ran into the same issue. The explanation is that by default, the screen is "assumed" to be at 96dpi, which ...


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In case anyone else runs into this, this is what I did (though I imagine there must be a better way): I got a spare monitor and connected it to the computer (after turning it off), along with the original monitor. (Fortunately my video card had multiple plugs.) On rebooting, I used nvidia-settings to move the new monitor's position to below the other one. ...


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i've just fixed the issue by changing in the property disply modi to 1920x1080 60Hz. it was 59Hz. this solved my problem, without doing with the registry.


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Yes, and no. To make the basic system see one large screen, you will have to enable Xinerama (the NVidia documentation is incorrect in this sense, and states you must disable it). However, even with Xinerama enabled and basic functionality working correctly, you will still have issues with some things not wanting to work properly, such as attempting to ...


1

I had the same problem and was finding nomodeset annoying not just because of the screen resolution, but because it really made compiz suck cpu. So I went back to not using nomodeset because I'd found that if I waited 5 minutes after booting, the screen would come on. Anyway, just now when I booted, it went black after the grub screen as usual, but the ...


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Even easier : xrandr -o normal


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Seems like ticking the Use hardware acceleration when available option in the advanced settings in chromium fixed this problem. I still don't know why it started only after upgrading to 16.04 though.


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I have a similar question with 16.04 with nvidia based graphic card to a Panasonic 26" TV,detected as an 32" if connected HDMI. I could solve the Output Problem, i can see the hole screen with the "underscan" Option, but this doesn't solve the reason for this Fault. The output of "xrandr" is stillgiving the worngphysicalMonitor size and i can't find the ...


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I have 4 laptops upgraded with 16.04, and they all behave a little different with what GRUB accepts. The preferred way should be to set in /etc/default/grub GRUB_GFXMODE=1920x1080x32 with the part after the equal sign the allowed resolutions for your device. Use either c at the GRUB prompt and enter vbeinfo, or run sudo hwinfo --framebuffer from the ...


3

No. It is physically impossible for an operating system to damage the LCD. Most likely the problem was that the LCD's ribbon cable had a loose connection to the motherboard. Either that or the display died on it's own...


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As with most other issues I have seen here - it was a bunch of random actions that fixed it. Connected to VGA and HDMI - only VGA worked. Created an installation USB for ubuntu 14.04 using "startup disk creator" and left it in the USB. Shutdown using the GUI. Booted into BIOS and changed the boot order to have USB boot first (or so I thought). ...


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Not 16.04 specific The issue you are facing is not exclusive to 16.04, it happens on many Ubuntu versions. How to solve Reading your output of xrandr, and assuming I made no typo, the following command should arrange your screens the way you set it up: xrandr --output DP2-2 --auto --pos 0x0 --output DP2-1 --auto --pos 2560x0 --output eDP1 --auto --pos ...


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This worked on Debian: 1.Click on Activities 2.Search "Tweak Tool" 3.In Tweak Tool search bar, search for "Window scaling", Drag the window till the "-" sign appears and decrease it. search for windows scaling Drag the window and decrease scaling value


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My version is 14.04, and I use the standard desktop given by Canonical - Unity. Using the workspace switcher, we can shift application(s) display to the 2nd monitor, by just dragging it. Here's how to do it after connecting external display to laptop: Enable workspaces Disable mirror display Open/Highlight (bring to front) the application window ...


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PART ONE There is a desktop zoom function which is configurable through the compizconfig-settings-manager. To install, run the following commands in a terminal: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager Now, run the following command to start it up or search ccsm in your desktop dash instead: ccsm & Under ...


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Use the Android app Xserver XSDL, which you can install on your Android device from Play Store. There are plenty of videos and other stuff on exactly how to set it up and run it, which is pretty easy. It works very well and I was using cheap tablets as a touchscreen display for the Pi before the 7" dedicated Pi came along. Using an X-server app on Android ...


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You can try to change grub configuration file. Open it sudo nano /etc/default/grub and go to the following line: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash" Now, next step depend on your computer. Try to change the above line, with one of the following: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=”quiet splash acpi_backlight=vendor” GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT=”quiet ...


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The simplest way is to use a program called xbacklight , open your terminal and type this sudo apt-get install xbacklight Brightness range can go upto 100 from 0 . type this xbacklight -set 50 to set brightness to 50 from 100. you can also increase and decrease the brightness from present value to specified level if you want to increase to 10% from ...


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You have several choices but perhaps the easiest is to place your command exactly as you have given above in your $HOME/.xprofile file. From here it will be executed every time you login. By default this file does not exist in Ubuntu and so may need to be created manually and then be made executable. The following commands will do this: touch ...



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