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The main issue here is bandwidth. According to this source which goes into detail about dasiy-chaining multiple displays using one DisplayPort 1.2 output shows that it will only support one 4K (3840x2160) display due to bandwidth issues. Taking this into account, DisplayPort 1.2 has an effective bandwidth of 17.28 Gbit/s whereas USB Type-C (USB 3.1 Gen2) has ...


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xrandr reports Failed to get size of gamma for output default. So maybe you need to set the gamma size of your display. The format for this command using xrandr is: xrandr --verbose --output monitor_name --gamma red:green:blue You can find out your monitor name using: xrandr | grep "connected" You want to set the gamma size to it's default values, so ...


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When you mirror displays in Ubuntu, the OS behaves like you have one monitor. If you had extended displays before, any files shown on the secondary monitor will be moved to the primary (and only) monitor. If one monitor can't support the other's resolution, Ubuntu will set it to the highest possible common resolution. This can result in stretching or black ...


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It turns out that this is not an ubuntu problem as such. I needed an active adapter to translate the DVI signal to the mini-dp signal. Buying this thing worked for me: http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B004I6L6DW?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00


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No, there is no such recommended value for sync rates. There is no way that Xorg know them dynamically only from monitor DDC data. Otherwise, you have to get a common frequency for monitors you have. The fallback frequencies are: (man xorg.conf) HorizSync horizsync-range gives the range(s) of horizontal sync frequencies supported by the ...


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Much complicated than I thought, as I tried playing with my Intel GPU for some time using xrandr. Sometimes, I get an unexpected errors. This is a summery for my experience. I recommend: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/X/Troubleshooting Here is a simplified full stack list, as I understand it. xrandr Xorg kernel driver graphic card ...


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This is a typical case caused by EDID/DDC communication from the connected and shared monitor DID NOT successfully and correctly passed between: 1. Connected systems to KVM switch, 2. or the shared monitor to the KVM switch. Normally, it is very easy to be solve - If the video sharing is for Sharing DVI monitor, then go for DVI-EDID emulator - let it ...


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There is no need to run commands nor install guest additions. I just hit shift+ctrl+c so it takes the guest host to scale mode, and then you can adjust the scale factor from settings display and adjust it for larger.


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Try arandr to change screen definitions. It's in the Ubuntu repository: sudo apt-get install arandr Arandr uses draggable rectangles that represent the physical displays - like display-management-software usually does. Unlike most other software, the displays may overlap, as seen in the screenshot in this thread. You may also try to fiddle around with ...


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might this help ? even re installing might be simpler incase you want to try some deeper digging. either is good i think https://www.debian-administration.org/article/201/Changing_X11_resolution_on_the_fly


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Boot the Ubuntu VirtualBox and press Shift to get Grub2 menu. Press c to bring Grub console Run vbeinfo to get supported modes Choose one and modify /etc/default/grub, example (Uncomment the line) GRUB_GFXMODE=1024x768x32 Update boot list sudo update-grub


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xrandr --addmode VGA 1920x1080_60.00 Only Last tell a reboot you can make it permanent .xprofile Just copy and paste the xrandr command line strings into your user ~/.xprofile file so it executed when you log in


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Click the Ubuntu logo in the upper left corner of the screen, type "resolution" and click the display. This will bring up a settings screen that allows you to set the resolution. For more details see video tutorial.


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So it turns out it's the quotation marks that mess this up. The contents of the file should be: [org.gnome.desktop.interface] text-scaling-factor=0.75 scaling-factor=2


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I was able to disable the display port by adding video=DP-2:d to the grub boot options. Notice that xrandr was showing DisplayPort-1 even though in reality DP-2 was enabled. Here's how I was able to find out which was the real output device thanks to the ArchLinux wiki: *To get the name and current status of connectors, you can use the following shell ...


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Just go to System Settings > Display and choose a lower resolution than 3840x2160, as I assume it is set currently. I would say that full HD (1920x1080) would be good, but you might want something a little higher resolution. While this solution works, depending on your application this may not work because native 4K content will only be played at the ...


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I solved this by typing in the full input. For some reason, this worked. I added the following line to my startup applications: xrandr --output DVI-I-2 --mode 1920x1080 --rate 144.00 Where you can see the output by just running xrandr and choosing your resolution plus desired hz. Remember 144.00, just 144 will not work.



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