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4

For a particular package: apt-cache show <packagename> | grep -E '^(.*Size|Version|Package)' Add or remove fields in the grep string as necessary. Since multiple versions may be present, I added the Version and Package fields as well. Note that the Installed Size field is an estimated value, in KB, whereas the Size field is for the package file and ...


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I am a big fan of baobab to figure out where the big files are hidden. To install: sudo apt-get install baobab


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8 GB space is fine enough for installation


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Sysstat is your friend, assuming you are fine with using the command line. Have a look for examples here for memory usage, and here for cpu usage.


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top has a batch mode (-b) that generates output without the screen control codes. By adding some other switches and options, you may be able to focus in on the stats you need and redirect it to a file or other program for processing.


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Have you tried Glances ? Refer this link, it has some thing in common. System Monitoring Tools For Ubuntu Best of luck !!


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Here is an answer which doesn't show directly asked packages info, it is covered in other answers in this thread, but though you will probably find helpful to have a list of what takes a lot of space on your file system. sudo du / -h|sort -n -r|less will show you the biggest files of your / at the top of the screen. It is generally related to looking for ...


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You can do this graphically in Synaptic. if it is not installed, Install it with the command: sudo apt install synaptic then: First ensure that you enabled the Installed Size and Download size columns (or only one if you want that one). To do this, go to Settings>Preferences and choose Columns and Fonts, then tick the columns you want to see. !Then ...


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I successfully cleared 3.5 GB by removing old headers and images, using the following command: dpkg -l 'linux-*' | sed '/^ii/!d;/'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d;s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/;/[0-9]/!d' | xargs sudo apt-get -y purge WARNING: Back up your system, I don't fully understand what this command does, but it messes with kernel ...


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http://www.sagemath.org/doc/installation/source.html#make-targets make distclean ... ever heard of RTFM? ;-)


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For unknown reasons the I/O scheduler has been changed from the default configuration (cfq - completely fair queuing) to deadline. Since I have the tlp tools installed to reduce the power consumption, my solution was to set the scheduler for all drives back to the default value in /etc/default/tlp: ... # Select io scheduler for the disk devices: ...



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