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xtrlock might be what you're looking for. It disables the keyboard until you type your password. It does also disable the mouse, but you might be able to change that in the config. Install it by running sudo apt-get install xtrlock.


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When you right click anywhere on the openbox desktop you should get a very small menu. It is not a normal menu. You can get a terminal and launch applications from the terminal or you can exit openbox which should bring you to a login page. To change the cycle choose Lubuntu from the dropdown menu from the fist icon above and login to Lubuntu. That is ...


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Shorter command to remove MATE: sudo aptitude purge `dpkg --get-selections|grep -E 'mate-|libmate|caja|atril|engrampa|marco'|cut -f 1` Source: codeinpython.blogspot.com


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This depends largely on how you are managing your data, and what you mean by GUI. If you use a database and you are working with that in a GUI and the GUI crashes (which honestly, I wouldn't worry too much about) then whatever has been updated/changed in your database will be found in the same state as you left it at the moment of said crash. However, as ...


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Only if there is volatile data relevant to an application that would ultimately fail as a result of your GUI failing, but mainly no. AKA if your GUI fails and a text editor is open and the text editor dies after the GUID dies Then you lose whatever was unsaved in the text editor. Basically no.


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Just backup. No, your data should not be affected by GUI crashes, but if you really want to be safe, backup, backup, backup.


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Turn the desktop black of all (possibly additionally) connected screens Not sure if the solution below is sufficient to you, but as an (additional?) measure, it should help to make it at least more difficult to access the system. As usual, it is mostly the combination of measures that makes incidental access more difficult. It could e.g be made more ...


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If someone has physical access to the computer, there is no way to protect it. Put it inside a box under lock and key For this kind of use it is best not to use Ubuntu Desktop. Use the Ubuntu server version, that has no desktop. Setup the WiFi hotspot as a service. A service (also called a daemon) starts when the computer starts and does not need anyone to ...


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If a system is really completely unattended, preventing a hacker from accessing your system is practically impossible (only think of simply restarting the system from an external medium). Having said that, what you describe can be done with a background script, but it already exists in the form of... Lockscreen :) Simply Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete, and click ...


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I would recommend either Linux Mint or Ubuntu. Before an year, I was a Windows user and tried several versions of Linux. I found Linux Mint as the easiest one, since it comes with most of the codecs and applications by default. Also it's user interface is easy to learn for Windows users. Once you fall in love with Linux (It may take some time, but definitely ...


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They are both good choices and both fully functional. Ubuntu MATE is arguably lighter for older hardware but beyond that your question is too subjective to answer. It's a matter of taste. My recommendation is to try them both out in live environments so you can see with a minimum of fuss which you prefer.


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Open a terminal and run mkdir somedir cd somedir sudo apt-get install -y debhelper wget http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/pool/main/u/ubuntu-extras-keyring/ubuntu-extras-keyring_2010.09.27.{tar.gz,dsc} tar -xf *.tar.gz cd ubuntu-extras-keyring-2010.09.17 debuild -i -us -uc -b sudo dpkg -i ../ubuntu-extras-keyring_2010.09.27_all.deb After that, ...


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From what I can tell, you have a wireless network with resources you need to access from your desktop. See this tutorial: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/NetworkConnectionBridge The easiest would be to make a bridge(laptop): apt-get install bridge-utils brctl addbr br1 brctl addif br1 eth0 brctl addif br1 wlan0 ifconfig br1 up dhclient -4 br1


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The majority of these instructions are for the laptop. First of all, disable UFW firewall for now: sudo ufw disable Next, plug the ethernet cable into both computers. Now, click on network-manager icon on the laptop and select edit connections. Click to select the wired connection and then click edit. Click on the ipv6 settings tab and change the ...


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Okay I'm adding another answer seeing as the comments won't allow spaces :>) The linux-kernel-lts-vivid should show up in your repositories.If you can then maybe install Synaptic and in it search for the package using the Search bar. To install Synaptic sudo apt-get install synaptic To install the latest nvidia propeitary drivers.You need to add the PPA ...


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Sorry for writing this as an answer can't comment because I'm below the reputation threshold.Try upgrading to the latest kernel then.To do that you need to install the linux-generic-lts-vivid package.To do so type this in the terminal sudo apt-get install linux-generic-lts-vivid


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I take it you are using GNOME then.It's pretty simple to optimize GNOME for Desktop usage.First go to their extensions site which is https://extensions.gnome.org In there download and install the following: Applications Menu Dash to dock User Themes AlternateTab Caffeine After installing all those extensions you should be able to use GNOME efficiently. ...


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Here's a little more in-depth overview: Unix-like systems are traditionally build with console only, and historically they were so from the beginning until developers came up with graphical interface. Particularly , there must be a graphical server (think of it as a program/software ). So in the old days you'd go to console, log in, and run startx command ...


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changed unity's sub-menu colour when I set up a new theme in KDE --> Solution: remove in the $HOME directory the .kde, .gconf and .config directories, logout and login again. All ubuntu configuration will be restored to the default when reating a new user.



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