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28

Of course you can do that. From the gnome DejaDup Help wiki (oh and where it says file you can also read directory) Restore a Lost File with Déjà Dup Open the file browser (Nautilus) Browse to the folder containing the file you lost Click File ▸ Restore Missing Files… When the Restore dialog appears, it will scan for files that are in the backup but ...


21

You need to install the python-boto package.


16

Configure Deja Dup for your root backup: gksu deja-dup-preferences. Run backup then with: gksu "deja-dup --backup". At least this worked for me. (You have to configure Deja Dup for root, too, at first - next to your configuration for the "normal" user.) As mythsmith says: "You can do that just for system folders, and still keep your home folder ...


14

Files associated with full and incremental backups: A full backup contains all the data of that backup, and it does not depend on any other backups. It consists of at least three files: duplicity-full.DATE.manifest (just one) duplicity-full.DATE.volYYY.difftar (one or more) duplicity-full-signatures.DATE.sigtar (just one) If the backup is encrypted, ...


14

Install Scheduled Tasks: Add a job to it with the following parameters (replace every minute with every hour or the schedule you want to use): You can even hide the pop-up window by using deja-dup --backup --auto as the command or use X-Application: suppress outup in the default behavior drop box, it will hide the window while deja-dup runs.


12

Yes, Déjà Dup now (as of Ubuntu 11.10) supports backing up files directly into Ubuntu One. Select 'Ubuntu One' under 'Storage', like below:


12

The deja-dup settings can also be changed with dconf-editor in the dconf-tools apt package. The settings are in org.gnome.DejaDup.


11

Déjà Dup is the front-end for the duplicity program, Duplicity stores its data in ~/.cache/duplicity. That folder can safely be removed, if you connect with an earlier backup, those files will be recreated from the backup. Settings for Déjà Dup are stored in dconf. (source: Where is the configuration for dejadup stored?). To quote Michael Terry: Hello! ...


10

Although it seems like the Déjà Dup code could not be easily modified to accomodate an hourly option, backups can be manually initiated and this can easily be added as a cron job that runs on the hour. Here are the steps you need to take: Run the following two commands in a terminal to enable local access to the X server: xhost +local: xhost Now run ...


10

After setting up your backup, press "back up now". A dialog will then appear asking you if you want to password-protect your backup. If you do choose a password, your backup is automatically encrypted with that password.


10

Firstly, this is not the system cache. The system cache is a cache that resides in memory and occupies physical memory that is not otherwise used by applications. This is a .cache folder inside your home directory, so not system-wide at all. You can, if you need the space, safely delete it (only a misbehaving program would die if you delete stuff it's put ...


10

This file is used to see the entropy when using cryptographic tools, e.g. OpenSSL. You can safely delete it and there's no need to backup it. So, why do we have it then? On most systems we don't have a lot of activity we can use as a random source and to speed up the process for generating random enough cryptographic keys, this file contains previously ...


9

So there are three possible places where Deja Dup might be out of space, and I don't think its error message tells you which. There is a bug filed about that. You may have run out of space on the target partition (which it sounds like you didn't) You may have run out of space in your home directory (~/.cache/deja-dup can get large) You may have run out of ...


8

Deja Dup cannot do that at the moment, you are right. And it currently doesn't plan to (the feature request bug is marked Won't Fix). I've heard good things about Back In Time, but haven't tried it myself.


8

Update Deja-dup to 24.x or latest release. In later version of 23.x they have added integrity check feature. Have a look this link. https://bugs.launchpad.net/deja-dup/+bug/1055356 After every backup, we make a small check to confirm we can restore a test file. And every two months, we make a more intensive check.


8

Yes, you can, but it's a bit hidden. You can do it on the console: gsettings set org.gnome.DejaDup.S3 bucket 'MYBUCKETNAME' Or you can do it graphically: Install the package 'dconf-tools' Run dconf-editor Browse to /org/gnome/deja-dup/s3 Edit the bucket key


7

Not yet, however there's been progress in this area, follow this bug report: https://bugs.launchpad.net/duplicity/+bug/1039511


7

Great question! I actually do this quite frequently (every few months). To do so, I use rsync to copy all of my /home partition/directory from the OLD machine to the NEW one. First, ensure that you have openssh-server and ecryptfs-utils installed and running on the NEW machine. sudo apt-get install openssh-server ecryptfs-utils You could install your ...


7

That feature is on the wishlist, for now you can try setting the schedule to monthly in the preferences and setup your own schedule using crontab and deja-dup --backup.


7

From v14 release note: The most visible new feature is much better support for external drives. Now Deja Dup will notice if the drive is not connected when a scheduled backup occurs, and will wait for it to be connected. It will notify you that it is waiting.


6

My 'back up now' button was disabled. In my case the problem was that when I opened the Deja Dup config, the 'storage' option was set to 'Ubuntu One', and it opened another window for logging into that. I changed the storage setting to a local drive, but it took me a while to realise I had to cancel the Ubuntu One login before Deja Dup would allow me to run ...


6

No, you can't. But Deja Dup is just a graphical front end for the command line tool duplicity, which you can use on a server. Its command line interface is a bit complicated, but read its man page or some of the instructions in Deja Dup's manual restore help page: https://live.gnome.org/DejaDup/Help/Restore/WorstCase


6

It looks like Déjà Dup keeps at least two full backups before it will free up space by overwriting old ones. You mention you have been using it for a 'couple months'. I bet that means you are up against this limitation. Full backups can't be scheduled exactly, but it is going to be about once a month with scheduled backups happening weekly. You can ...


6

The above answer did not work for me as the drive that had originally been backed up has has been removed. I share the procedure I followed below: In a terminal, type: duplicity list-current-files --no-encryption file:///[path_to_backup_folder] > /home/[your_username]/list.txt Be aware of the format "file:///..." in which duplicity expects to ...


6

It seems that it doesn't really save them anywhere, but if you run it with the environment variable DEJA_DUP_DEBUG=1 you can get all the information that way. Source: https://answers.launchpad.net/deja-dup/+question/125731


5

duplicity, which Déjà Dup is built upon on, does not have any such intelligence. Hence any moved or renamed files will be treated as new files.


5

That button is grayed out when a backup (or restore) is already in progress. Maybe one was running in the background? Is the button enabled now?


5

This has changed in various Déjà Dup versions, but I believe it is currently at: ~/.gconf/apps/deja-dup/ What can't you change using the GUI front-end? UPDATE from: launchpad.net: How do I also backup my deja Dup settings? The settings used to be stored there, and the files are still present. In more recent version they are stored in: ~/.config/dconf ...


5

Yes and no. There is nothing in Déjà Dup which makes it specifically aware of Dropbox. On the other hand, Déjà Dup can be pointed to a local path, so there is always the option of running your backups towards a path within the Dropbox folder. As always will should test that you actually can restore, preferably from another computer connected to the same ...


5

I have just restored a system, myself. I am a newbie to Ubuntu, but I have learned a lot and I am a fan of multi-partitions. Backing up /etc; well I don't know, but having a record of 'fstab' is essential and during the re-installation, remembering to only format the / partition is also important. As a result of having a mount point at /home/my-namefor my ...



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