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According to man dh_installcron: --name=name Look for files named debian/package.name.cron.* and install them as etc/cron.*/name, instead of using the usual files and installing them as the package name. So name your debian/package-name.foobar.cron.d, and add to debian/rules: override_dh_installcron: dh_installcron --name=foobar


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I've not tried myself the following commands, but they should work with none or minimal modification. How can I build a package from the development branch to install locally on my system ? Download branch $ bzr branch lp:~pmarchwiak/synapse-project/recoll-plugin Install dependencies $ sudo apt-get install devscripts equivs dh-autoreconf ...


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Depends on what you're trying to achieve. If you need a package to conveniently uninstall later, then checkinstall would be a good choice: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CheckInstall


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How about adding a condition to check if the file exists or not before attempting to remove it in your POSTRM script? That should let the dpkg do its stuff gracefully without failing due to a non-existent file.


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According to man dpkg-source: -Dfield=value Override or add an output control file field. And from man dpkg-buildpackage: --source-option=opt Pass option opt to dpkg-source. So perhaps you could override the Depends field thus: dpkg-buildpackage --source-option='-DDepends=...' ...


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A package can depend on any version of another package, but the package management system will only be able to install that dependency if it is in the enabled repositories. So you will have to add that PPA to the target system before installing your package.Your installation instructions will look like this: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:... sudo apt-get ...


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It varies by developer / source code, but the resulting .deb are often in one of 3 locations, the parent directory, the build directory, or sometimes in a directory within the source code. If not specified in the README, you can find them with locate or find. sudo updatedb locate *.deb $HOME



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